Tuesday, February 21, 2017 Page Options

BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

   Minimize




September 26th, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING September 30, 1967

 

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’67:

No. 5 (LW 4) “REFLECTIONS”

The SupremesMOTOWN1111

No. 4 (LW 3) “COME BACK WHEN YOU GROW UP”

Bobby Vee & The Strangers LIBERTY55964

No. 3 (LW 5) “NEVER MY LOVE”  

The Association WARNER BROTHERS7074

No. 2 (LW 2) “ODE TO BILLIE JOE” 

Bobbi Gentry CAPITOL5950


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“THE LETTER”

The Box Tops

       MALA RECORDS565


One of the ‘60s more endurable recordings was one of the shortest No. 1 records in the history of the Hot 100 Singles chart. “The Letter” from the Memphis area band, the Box Tops, clocked-in at 1:58 on the Mala Records label; a subsidiary of Bell Records, which eventually became Arista. Somewhat oddly, all of the Box Tops albums were released on the parent label Bell Records. By far, the Dan Penn-produced song “The Letter” was the biggest hit in the history of Mala Records. The lead singer of the Box Tops was Alex Chilton, who was only 16 years-old at the time of the recording of “The Letter.”

The band had been known as the Devilles for four years prior to their name change, but had to change it due to another band by already claiming the identifyer. The group got their new name when Wayne Carson Thompson said they needed to change the moniker, and reportedly said they should have a contest with people sending in 50 cents and a box top. If you’re of a certain age, you may remember redeeming cereal box tops for merchandise. The band played their instruments on some of their recordings, including “The Letter,” but other Memphis musicians help round-out their sound, including the recently departed soul man extraordinaire Bobby Womack, electric sitar and guitar phenom Reggie Young and bass player Tommy Cogbill. He was involved with the so-called “Memphis Boys” the studio cats at the American Recording Studios run by Chips Moman where “The Letter” was cut. Other members of the initial line-up of the Box Tops were guitarist Gary Talley, electric 12-string and rhythm guitarist John Evans, keyboardist/bassist Billy Cunningham (who became a classical music upright bass player after leaving the band) and drummer Danny Smythe. Evans and Smythe left the group in late 1967 after recording this first two LPs, and were replaced by Tom Boggs and Rick Allen. Big Jay’s FAVE Box Tops record was their last hit from 1969 called “Soul Deep.” I saw them perform live that year, opening for the Beach Boys. Evans now repairs stringed instruments. Billy Cunningham quit high school in his Junior year to go on the road with the Box Tops. Cunningham’s father played on some early Elvis Presley tracks when the King was on the Sun Records label in 1954-55. The gravely-voiced Alex Chilton went on to record with Big Star to critical acclaim and in fact drove a New York City cab in between gigs. Chilton died in 2010.  

 

EASY LISTNEING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“THE WORLD WE KNEW (Over And Over)”

Frank Sinatra

REPRISE RECORDS – 0610

The Chairman of the Board had quite a streak going in 1966 and ’67 with six-straight No. 1 songs on the Easy Listening Singles chart, starting with “It Was A Very Good Year,” followed by “Strangers In The Night,” “Summer Wind,” “That’s Life,” “Somethin’ Stupid” (with his daughter Nancy) and this week’s chart-topping single “The World We Knew (Over And Over)” all on Sinatra’s Reprise Records label. All six were also charted on the Hot 100 Singles list as well, with two of them No. 1 Pop hits. “The World We Knew (Over And Over)” was the final Sinatra recording to sit atop the Easy Listening Singles chart. 

The song was co-written by two German-born tunesmiths, Bert Kaempfert, Herbert Rehbein along with Brooklyn-born Carl Sigman; all legendary songwriters. Though only reaching No. 30 on the Hot 100, “The World We Knew (Over And Over)” had five consecutive weeks as the biggest hit on the Easy Listening Singles listing; with this being the final seven-day survey-period in that position. The album that original contained the song has been alternately known as The World We Knew, or sometimes just called Frank Sinatra. The track “Somethin’ Stupid” was also on this LP. The renowned Gordon Jenkins arranged and conducted the orchestra on the album. 

 

TOP SELLING

R&B SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“FUNKY BROADWAY”

Wilson Pickett

ATLANTIC RECORDS – 2430


The Wicked Wilson Pickett was ridin’ high atop the Best Selling R&B Singles chart this week with “Funky Broadway.” Pickett’s version was remake (not a cover) of a song that had just been a minor Pop hit (No. 65) in the spring of ’67 by Dyke and the Blazers. That groups’ leader (and this tunes songwriter) Arlester “Dyke” Christian was shot to death in 1971. That group was from Buffalo, New York. Atlantic Records included the song on the album The Sound of Wilson Pickett, which was recorded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama at the Fame Studios. The owner of the facility, Rick Hall, produced that LP along with Tom Dowd and Executive Producer Jerry Wexler. See here why he was called “Wicked.”

Some of the south’s finest studio cats were on hand for the LP The Sound Of Wilson Pickett, including: Tommy Cogbill on bass, writer/producer/guitarist Chips Moman, Roger Hawkins on drums, Spooner Oldham on keyboards, and what were known as the Memphis Horns who received a Grammy® Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. Pickett’s rendition of “Funky Broadway” reached not only the pinnacle position of the Top Selling R&B Single chart (for one week) he made it to No. 8 on the Hot 100 with the oh-so-funky record. A one-time member of the vocal group the Falcons, Pickett was placed in the class of ’91 at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Wilson Pickett died in 2006.

 

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

September 30, 1967


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:


No. 1

Pop

LP


SGT. PEPPER’S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND


The Beatles

CAPITOL RECORDS2653


This was the thirteenth week out of an ultimate 14 for the landmark record by the Beatles; Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band on Capitol Records in the U.S. The record was begun on November 24, 1966 at the EMI Studios on Abbey Road, after the Fab Four hadn’t willingly been alone much for over two months, as they everlastingly ended touring just three months earlier. Little did anybody recognize, that what was about to come to pass, would conceivably have the most intellectual effect on what was looked upon as Pop music. The initial song recorded deliberately for this project was “Strawberry Fields Forever,” but that song was considered so superior, it wasn’t incorporated on the impending LP, and was itself a magnum opus. Instead, it was teamed with “Penny Lane” as a single for global release in February of ’67, while the Beatles worked on even more cuts for what would be a ground-shaking bit of work, concluding the LP with “A Day In The Life” seen and heard here in the remastered version.

In reality, the British edition of the LP didn’t end with “A Day In The Life.” With the help of Geoff Emerick, they decided to insert two rather peculiar things after the last sounds of the giant climax of the song ran its course. First, John Lennon wanted something that nearly all humans couldn’t take notice of—a 15 kilocycle tone—something only dogs could recognize. Then, in a last stroke of madness, the boys recorded absurd noises and balderdash, which was then edited and turned backward; placed in what’s called the concentric run-out groove—the spot where automatic turntables pick up the tone-arm to permit another LP to fall to the spinning surface. On record players that were physically operated, this silliness could, hypothetically go on perpetually. Later digital copies of the album take account of these sounds, but fades out after repeating the craziness for more than a few seconds.

 

TOP SELLING R&B LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


ARETHA ARRIVES

Aretha Franklin

ATLANTIC RECORDS – 8150


The title says Aretha Arrives. But she’d already quickly become the un-disputed Queen of Soul with her earlier LP I Never Loved A Man for Atlantic Records. This second record for the label featured just one hit; “Baby I Love You”—the follow-up single to “Respect” and another million-seller. Aretha Arrives was recorded a bit later than the label anticipated, as she had shattered her elbow in a motor-vehicle accident; restricting the use of her piano playing on the album. Here’s the Ronnie Shannon tune (he also wrote “I Never Loved A Man (The Way That I Love You”) “Baby I Love You,” which was the No. 1 song on the Top Selling R&B Singles chart during the last two weeks of August of ’67, also gaining the No. 4 slot on the Pop Hot 100 in early September.  

You’ll note a thread of continuity on many of the ’67 songs mentioned above this week. Several of the same musicians that played on the records by Wilson Pickett, and on some albums by the Box Tops were utilized for Aretha Arrives; notably Spooner Oldham, Tommy Cogbill and Chips Moman, along with guitar-man Joe South and sax great King Curtis. Aretha’s sisters Erma and Carolyn Franklin did the backing vocals. The track was recorded in the Atlantic Studios in Manhattan, as was the rest of Aretha Arrives. The B side of the single was the traditional arrangement called “Goin’ Down Slow.” The LP was filled with mostly remakes of hits by other artists including: “You Are My Sunshine,” “96 Tears” and “That’s Life.” It was engineered by Tom Dowd and produced by Jerry Wexler.


THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

September 29, 1973

 

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES


THIS WEEK IN ‘73:

No. 5 (LW 3) “DELTA DAWN”

Helen Reddy CAPITOL3645

No. 4 (LW 4) “LOVES ME LIKE A ROCK”

Paul Simon (with the Dixie Hummingbirds) COLUMBIA45907

No. 3 (LW 7) “HALF BREED

Cher MCA40102

No. 2 (LW 1)“LET’S GET IT ON”

Marvin Gaye TAMLA54234


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“WE’RE AN AMERICAN BAND”

Grand Funk

CAPITOL RECORDS3660

Oh to be a Rock & Roll star. You can write a song about not only a rather legendary groupie, but you could also mention four other girls who had a rather ‘fun’ night with the boys in a hotel AND make a ton of money by performing it. One of the great producers/performers of our time, Todd Rundgren produced the second biggest hit for Grand Funk with “We’re An American Band” on Capitol Records. The record was the biggest hit in America on the Hot 100 Singles listing for just this week in ’73, but was a million-selling 45 RPM. Rundgren was also dispatched to produce their best-selling single, the re-make of “The Loco-Motion” from their next LP Shinin’ On in ’74. “We’re An American Band” was written by band member/drummer Don Brewer and was taken from the album also called We’re An American Band. How about a little more cowbell? You’re wish is my command with a little Grand Funk.

Their name was a take-off on a real railroad called Grand Trunk Western Railroad. Make the trunk into funk, drop the Western—and you had a great identifier. The group dropped the word Railroad from their moniker after once again missing the Top 20 on the Hot 100 under the guidance of their original manager Terry Knight. They dumped him, and dropping the train reference, instantly netted the group a No. 1 song. It’s not like the group was a loser outfit; quite the contrary. Their albums sold millions prior to the LP We’re An American Band, with the group selling-out Shea Stadium in less than a day way before computers allowed instant access to seats and sell-outs in minutes. Concerts by the band were events. But a really big hit SINGLE was elusive—until “We’re An American Band.” It didn’t hurt that after the firing of Knight, they hired Linda McCartney’s brother’s law firm (John Eastman) to manage their business affairs. Plus, the addition of Rundgren to re-shape their sound with a bit more polish didn’t harm their aggressive and noisy resonance. Mark Farner was the group’s main lead singer and guitarist. On this record, the trio was made into a quartet with drummer Don Brewer (who also sang lead on “We’re An American Band”) bassist Mel Schacher along with a new keyboard player named Craig Frost from their native Flint, Michigan. If you have a copy of the 45 RPM, you already know the original issue was on gold-colored see-through vinyl. By ’75, with a new producer, the act went back to the Grand Funk Railroad name but broke up by ’76 with Farner drifting into Contemporary Christian music. A few reunions ensued, only to see the band drift apart after a few non-hit albums. Farner is a solo act again, and Brewer and Schacher tour with new members as Grand Funk Railroad.     

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

 

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“I’M COMING HOME”


Johnny Mathis

COLUMBIA RECORDS – 45908


Could it be that Johnny Mathis never had a No. 1 Easy Listening Singles chart hit before this one? Chances are that’s correct. It would seem like he’d be the KING of the Easy Listening category, but Mathis finally got to the top of this chart for just this sole survey-period with “I’m Coming Home” on his long-time label Columbia Records, with the tune co-written by Thom Bell (he also arranged it) and Linda Creed. Here’s a live TV performance with a large orchestra, similar to that on the recording.

This ‘Philly-sound’ production was engineered by Bob Tarsia, who oversaw most of the Cameo/Parkway recordings in Philadelphia during the ‘50s and ‘60s and was behind the console for hundreds of other tracks for Gamble and Huff Productions. Mathis’ version was his first chart hit on the Hot 100 in four years. And even though it only attained a lowly No. 75, it was the start of a comeback by the star. His last Top 10 hit was in 1963 with “What Will Mary Say.” “I’m Coming Home” was also made into an R&B hit the following year by the Spinners over on Atlantic Records. That time around, the Spinners’ version reached No. 18 in the Hot 100 and No. 3 on the Hot Soul Singles chart.

 

BEST SELLING SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73


No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“HIGHER GROUND”

Stevie Wonder

TAMLA RECORDS54235


“Higher Ground” was in the pinnacle position of the Best Selling Soul Singles list for only this week in ’73, replacing Marvin Gaye’s six-week run in the top spot for “Let’s Get It On.” Another ‘Motown’ act would replace Stevie Wonder next week, with one-time Temptations member Eddie Kendricks taking over with a two-week reign with “Keep On Truckin’,” which gave Tamla Records a streak of nine consecutive survey-phases in the No. 1 location. Stevie Wonder played every instrument on “Higher Ground” from his ’73 LP Innervisions on Tamla Records. “Higher Ground” got to a respectable No. 4 on the Hot 100 Singles chart at the end of October. But this week it was the peak on the Best Selling Soul Single chart.

The LP Innervisions was released for public purchase just three days before Stevie had finished a show and was involved in an automobile crash with a log truck in North Carolina that left him in a coma for four days. He was sitting in the front passenger seat. It was touch and go for a while regarding whether or not Stevie would pull-through or suffer brain damage due to the head trauma of a gigantic cut tree smashing into his head. But pull-through he did; and this album ended up being one of the centerpieces of his career, with accolades from dozens of respected publications listing Innervisions as one of the greatest LPs of all time.  

 

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

September 29, 1973

TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73:


No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week No. 1)


BROTHERS

AND SISTERS


Allman Brothers Band

CAPRICORN RECORDS0111


This week’s biggest LP in America was from the Allman Brothers Band on Capricorn Records called Brothers And Sisters. After “Ramblin’ Band” was recorded, bass player Berry Oakley was killed in a motorcycle accident. Oakley had been depressed over the death of Duane Allman in a similar bike accident in 1971. Oakley had spiraled into drug and alcohol addiction prior to his death which may have played a factor in the crash. But the band played on (as they say) with new members including Chuck Leavell on keyboards (a later member of the Rolling Stones touring and recording entourage) and bass guitar player Lamar Williams. After moving to a farm in a communal-setting in Juliette, Georgia, the ensemble assembled in the Capricorn Studios in Macon, GA for three months of the recording of what became Brothers And Sisters. This album was the nation’s chart-topper on the Top LPs & Tape listing. It was enjoying its fourth of an eventual five survey-periods at the apex this week in ‘73. The lead track had its genesis back in ’71 with the writing of “Ramblin’ Man” not quite completed at that time by Dickey Betts. It was initially labeled as “Ramblin’ Country Man.” But here’s the finished product.  

But let’s get back into the studio, where Dickey Betts and session guitarist Les Dudek traded guitar licks on what became “Ramblin’ Man.” That finished track ended up being the Allman Brothers Band’s biggest hit single, attaining the No. 2 slot in October of ’73. It did reach No. 1 on Cashbox Magazine’s singles chart. After the sessions for the album, Dudek told people he was a new member of the band after his dueling guitar parts with Betts who wrote the song. The group was fuming mad once they caught wind of that statement, as they said nobody could or would replace Duane Allman. Needless to say, Dudek never played with them again. He was also not under any deal with the group other than as a session player; thus, he was denied credit for writing the popular album track “Jessica.” That tune was released as a single in early ’74, only reaching No. 65 on the Hot 100, but has since become a classic rock staple.  

 

 

HOT SOUL LPS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)


LET’S GET IT ON

Marvin Gaye

TAMLA RECORDS329V1


This was the first week of a superb run at the zenith of the Hot Soul LPs chart for Marvin Gaye’s sexually-charged album Let’s Get It On from Tamla Records. It would go on to have a total of 11 weeks in the top spot. His single, “Let’s Get It On” had just completed a six-week odyssey as the leading 45 RPM record on the Hot Soul Singles chart, and two non-consecutive weeks as the leader of the Pop Hot 100 Singles register. In addition to the song “Let’s Get It On” (written by Gaye and Ed Townsend) the LP also contained a Big Jay fave, “Come Get To This” which attained the No. 21 on the Pop Hot 100 and No. 3 on the Hot Soul Singles chart. Here’s a live version of “Come Get To This.”

Marvin Gaye had written “Come Get To This” back in 1970 during the time of the sessions for the album What’s Going On. On the single of “Come Get To This” (which was re-mixed in Los Angeles after being originally recorded in the Motor-City) the Detroit Symphony Orchestra string section was utilized on the track along with the Funk Brothers, the Motown recording session band. A third single was released from the Let’s Get It On album; “You Sure Love To Ball” which got to No. 13 on the Hot Soul Singles list, and only No. 50 on the Pop Hot 100. It’s likely the song’s title and content was just a bit TOO overtly sexual for many radio stations to put in their rotations. That’s too bad, because radio personalities would have had a field day with announcing the song; your Big Jay included.

 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

October 3, 1981


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘81:


 

No. 5 (LW 6) “THERE’S NO GETTIN’ OVER ME”

Ronnie Milsap RCA12264

No. 4 (LW 6) “WHO’S CRYING NOW”

Journey COLUMBIA02241

No. 3 (LW 3 ) “STOP DRAGGIN’ MY HEART AROUND”

Stevie Nicks (with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers) MODERN7336

No. 2 (LW 7) “ARTHUR’S THEME (BEST THAT YOU CAN DO)

Christopher Cross WARNER BROS.49787


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

  

“ENDLESS LOVE”

Diana Ross & Lionel Richie

MOTOWN RECORDS1519


Lift up your hand if you remember three people who starred in the film that featured the song “Endless Love.” If you answered Brooke Shields along with Martin Hewitt and a little known first-time on a screen actor named Tom Cruise, you’d be accurate. Endless Love was only the 22nd highest grossing motion picture that year, but the song, written by Lionel Richie, was the prime hit of the calendar year in ’81, if you take into account that “Physical” by Olivia Newton-John was also No. 1 in the beginning month of 1982 as a carry-over from ’81—10 weeks total. “Endless Love” still is the biggest record to date for both Ross and Richie; plus was called the “best duet of all time” in 2011 by Billboard Magazine. Add to those accolades, the record got Oscar® and Golden Globe® nominations for Best Original Song, losing both to “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do).”


(*See next entry.) It has also been tabbed as the most successful song featured on a soundtrack that actually was heard in a motion picture.

Tensions over Richie’s solo endeavors made it necessary for him to depart the Commodores (after a triumphant career with the group) when the 45 RPM became such a huge recording. Richie had written the music for what became “Endless Love” while a member of the Commodores. He was asked by the film’s director Franco Zeffirelli to add lyrics to the melody after he and Jon Peters heard it. Though Diana Ross had freshly left Motown Records for RCA Records, she was granted authorization to record the duet with Richie and it was released on Motown. The original score was on Mercury Records. Ross never saw the lyrics until she and Lionel recorded it. They had to do those vocals at a studio in Reno, Nevada near where the diva was performing at a casino at Lake Tahoe, Nevada. This was the eighth survey-period of an ultimate nine weeks at the zenith of the Hot 100 Singles chart for the super-hit. Ms. Ross never had another #1 song, and she only hit the Top-10 four times after “Endless Love”. They were: “Why Do Fools Fall In Love,” “Mirror, Mirror,” “Muscles” and “Missing You”—a song about Marvin Gaye. The hits ended for the Diana in ’86 with her last three charting records co-produced by Barry Gibb and Michael Jackson failing to give Ross anything near a Top-40 hit.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY TRACKS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’81:


No.1

 

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“ARTHUR’S THEME (Best That You Can Do)

Christopher Cross

WARNER BROS. RECORDS 49787


Another movie tune was hot this week in ’81—this time in the peak position on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart— from Grammy® and soon-to-be Oscar® winner Christopher Cross. His recording, co-written by Peter Allen, Burt Bacharach (his then soon-to-be wife) Carole Bayer Sager along with Cross, was in the second of four back-to-back weeks on this chart. “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” would knock off “Endless Love” on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart in a couple of weeks for a three-week seat at the thrown of that listing. Here’s a live version of this big hit.



The lyric, “When you get caught between the moon and New York City” was from a past collaboration between Peter Allen and Carole Bayer Sayer that was never let loose on the public. But it came to good use in this song. The song was contained in an LP called Arthur – The Album, also on Warner Brothers Records, featuring songs by the late Nicolette Larson, the group Ambrosia and Stephen Bishop. The Steve Gordon-directed film starred Dudley Moore, Liza Minnelli and (Sir Arthur) John Geilgud, who died at the ripe old age of 96. Also the movie’s screenwriter, Gordon passed away ironically in New York City of a heart-attack just one year after Arthur was released. Moore died of a brain-disorder in Plainfield, NJ in 2002.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’81:

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“ENDLESS LOVE”

Diana Ross & Lionel Richie

MOTOWN RECORDS1519


It was the last of a seven-week run at the height of the Hot Soul Singles chart for “Endless Love” by Diana and Lionel. (**See the story of this song on the Hot 100 Singles chart listing above.)

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 3, 1981


TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘81:


No. 1

Pop

LP & Tape

(Last Week No. 1)


TATTOO YOU

The Rolling Stones

ROLLING STONES RECORDS16052


The Bad-Boys of Rock & Roll were on top of the U.S. Top LPs & Tape chart for the last time with Tattoo You, distributed in America by Atlantic Records on the groups’ own Rolling Stones Records. This was the third of nine eventual weeks at the crest of this directory. Indeed, the album was merely a bunch of mostly out-takes and left-over songs from the ‘70s, recorded in Paris and the Bahamas. Part of the reason for no new material on this collection was that Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were not on splendid terms and hadn’t sat down to write new tunes. They did agree to tour America and Europe, and needed an album of seemingly new songs to promote to the concert audiences. Improbably, the critics and the public liked the record, largely on the strength of “Start Me Up” which had been recorded during the Some Girls album sessions in ’78. So that track was over three years old by the time it saw the light of day. And, in addition, the song was rehearsed but not fully produced as far back at 1975 during the session for the album Black And Blue. “Start Me Up” was released in August as the first single from the set, and ended up reaching No. 2 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, kept out of the top slot by “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” by Christopher Cross and “Private Eyes” by Daryl Hall & John Oates. Here’s one of the most powerful records the Stones ever did.

The second single from Tattoo You was even older. “Waiting On A Friend” dates back to 1972, and because of that, the guitar player who replaced Brian Jones—Mick Taylor—was originally on the track. However, in overdubbing for this ‘new’ song, only Keith Richards’ guitar work is featured, even though Taylor’s replacement, and guitar player Ron Wood was in the group by the time Tattoo You was released. Wood IS featured in the video for the single, but not the actual audio track itself. The song got to No. 13 on the Hot 100. The building shown in the video for “Waiting On A Friend” is right here in New York City on St. Mark’s Place; the same building featured on the cover of Led Zeppelin’s 1975 album Physical Graffiti. A third single from Tattoo You was called “Hang Fire” and was released in the spring of ’82, just attaining the No. 20 position on the Hot 100. Mick Jagger wanted the LP to be called simply Tattoo. But he claims his Glimmer Twin Keith put the word “YOU” on it, infuriating Jagger.

 

HOT SOUL LPS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘81

No. 1

SOUL

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


STREET SONGS

Rick James

GORDY RECORDSG8-1002


It was the 18th of an ultimate 20 weeks as the principal album on the Hot Soul LPs chart for Rick James with his record Street Songs. The first single to materialize from the LP was “Give It To Me Baby” on Gordy Records. That song just scarcely tip-toed into the Top 40 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, but had just completed a five-week stay at the top of the Hot Soul Singles chart the previous week. The album reached No. 3 on the Top LPs & Tape chart too. The subsequent single from Street Songs was the everlasting monument to Rick James, at least on the POP side of the charts. “Super Freak” (No. 16 Pop) is his most remembered song; not just for the slightly depraved lyrics, but the addition of the Temptations on the backing vocals. It’s super freaky, ain’t it?

Plus, James’ recording was ably sampled in 1990’s smash by MC Hammer, “U Can’t Touch This.” Despite the mainstream and lasting success of “Super Freak,” Rick’s initial single for Motown (Gordy Records) was, in point of fact, his highest-charting Hot 100 single; “You And I” springing to No. 13 out of the box as the introduction 45 RPM release back in ’78. “You And I” was No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles chart for two weeks that summer. The album Street Songs sold over three million copies, helping a slipping Motown recoup some of its sheen in the early ‘80s.


**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
);