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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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September 19th, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING September 26, 1964

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’64:

No. 5 (LW 7) “REMEMBER (Walking In The Sand)”

The Shangra-LasRED BIRD10-008

No. 4 (LW 5) “G.T.O.”

Ronny and the Daytonas MALA481

No. 3 (LW 1) “THE HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN”  

The Animals MGM13264

No. 2 (LW 2) “BREAD AND BUTTER” 

 HICKORY1269

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 4)

 

“OH, PRETTY WOMAN”

Roy Orbison

and the Candymen

MONUMENT RECORDS851

He’s in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. That should be a clue to the stellar talent of Roy Orbison. He didn’t win a Grammy® (six in total) until 1980—after a career that began in the mid-‘50s. This was the first of an ultimate three back-to-back survey-periods in ’64 at No. 1 on the Hot 100 Singles chart for one of most enduring songs of the 20th Century and even into the 21st; “Oh, Pretty Woman” (on some pressings it was simply “Pretty Woman”) on the Monument Records label. “Candy Man” was one of his earlier hits; thus, the backing group the Candymen got an unusual credit directly under Orbison’s name on the 45 RPM that led the Hot 100 Singles chart. The Candymen were actually a bunch of some of the best studio musicians in Nashville, including: Floyd Cramer, pianist, and three guitarists (four if you include Roy) Billy Sanford, Jerry Kennedy and Wayne Moss. Plus, if you listen carefully, there were two saxophone’s deep in the mix played by Boots Randolph and Charlie McCoy. The upright bass was performed by a guy named Bob Moore and there were TWO drummers playing that steady, hypnotic beat: Paul Garrison and Buddy Harman. Here’s the song in all of its glory from the movie named after it.

It should be noted that Orbison and the producer of the song, Fred Foster, won a Nashville Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum Award for Iconic Riff Award in 2014 for the guitar sounds in the July ’64 recording. The song opens with one electric guitar, then another, followed by a third from the studio cats; with Roy’s Epiphone-Bard acoustic 12-string in the mix as well once the song gets into high gear. The song was recorded in producer Foster’s studio in Nashville. The idea for the title came from the song’s co-writer (with Orbison) Bill Dee’s when the duo was simply putting songs to paper. Dee’s reportedly commented on Orbison’s then wife Claudette wanting to go shopping while they were writing. Roy said something like, “Do you need some money?” Dee’s is said to have exclaimed, “A pretty woman never needs money,” and the rest is history. There was a sad ending for Claudette, as she was killed in 1966 while the two were riding motorcycles and Mrs. Orbison was hit by a tractor-trailer, instantly killing her. They had divorced while “Oh, Pretty Woman” had completed its chart-run due to her alleged infidelities, only to reconcile in ’65. Then, in 1968, while Roy was on tour in England, his house in Tennessee burnt to the ground with his two sons dying in the blaze. Orbison’s career in America went south from there (he was still popular in Europe) until he performed a duet with Emmylou Harris and his ‘80s teaming with producer Jeff Lynn for the first album with the Traveling Wilbury’s. Roy’s comeback was sealed, only to have his life end abruptly at the age of 52 due to a massive heart-attack on December 6, 1988.

 

 POP-STANDARD SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No.1

Pop Standard

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“WE’LL SING IN THE SUNSHINE”

Gale Garnett

RCA VICTOR RECORDS – 8388

Not too many recording artists who have had big hits in the U.S. have come from New Zealand. This one did, via North-of-the-Border. This week in ’64, Gale Garnett was enjoying the first of seven big consecutive register-periods as the biggest hit on the Pop-Standard Singles chart with the No. 1 song, “We’ll Sing In The Sunshine” on RCA Victor. Here’s Gale Garnett’s only major hit in glorious black and white.

Gale Garnett had moved from New Zealand to Canada when she was nine years-old, and as a teen had done some guest appearance on American TV shows like 77 Sunset Strip. She continued acting on shows such as Bonanza, Hawaiian Eye and others after she had her only major hit, “We’ll Sing In The Sunshine” that was self-penned. Basically a folk song, the tune also was a minor hit on the Country/Western Singles chart, and reached No. 4 on the American Hot 100. Garnett won an honor on behalf of her hit for Best Folk Recording at the 7th Annual Grammy® Awards in early ’65. She moved on from her folky-phase and began performing psychedelic music to little notice. But, if you’re fan of the 2002 film My Big Fat Greek Wedding, you’ll spot Gale Garnett in a small part as Aunt Lexy. More recently, she played a character named Daniela on the TV show Flashpoint in an episode in 2011.   

 

**NOTE:

There was no HOT R&B SIDES Chart this week in ‘64, as Billboard Magazine stopped reporting this listing from November of ’63 through January of ’65. In its place, I have chosen the Cashbox Magazine R&B Singles chart to portray the biggest R&B single this week in ’64.

 

CASHBOX

R&B SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No.1

Cashbox

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

“FUNNY”

(Or alternately known as)

“FUNNY HOW TIMES SLIPS AWAY”

Joe Hinton   

BACK BEAT RECORDS – 541

 

Joe Hinton, the one-time Gospel music singer had the biggest hit of his secular career this week with “Funny,” a song written by Willie Nelson. This Back Beat Records song was in the third of four ultimate weeks as the No. 1 45 RPM on the Cashbox R&B Singles chart. The song also reached No. 13 on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart from Billboard in ’64. Hinton had some success as a member of the Spirit of Memphis Quartet, formed way back in 1927; with Hinton joining in 1956. The so-called “Church-Wrecking” group had signed a deal with Peacock Records’ owner Don Robey in the late ‘50s. I’ve discussed this Robey character before, as he exploited many artists with little pay in exchange for having lucrative hit songs, but he was one of the first Black owners of an American record company. Robey convinced Joe Hinton to try his hand in secular songs for his Back Beat subsidiary label. At first he had little success with some lowly-charting singles, but finally hit pay-dirt with the Willie Nelson song, “Funny How Time Slips Away” (shortened to “Funny”) containing an ethereal high tenor note that still sends chills down many-a-spine. Hinton wasn’t able to capitalize on that success after Nelson’s composition was a hit. Joe Hinton died just four years later of skin cancer in ’68. There are no known videos I can post for his biggest 45 RPM release. “Funny” or “Funny How Time Slips Away” has been recorded by countless artists over the years, enabling Willie to buy a few little green weeds.  

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

September 26, 1964

TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:

No. 1

Pop

LP

A HARD DAY’S NIGHT

Original Motion Picture Soundtrack 

The Beatles

UNITED ARTISTS RECORDS

3366 (MONO) – 6366 (STEREO)

The first pressings of A Hard Day’s Night -- The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, mis-spelled the title of the song “I’ll Cry Instead”—and instead labeled it “I Cry Instead.” So, United Artists Records had to quickly change not only the back cover of the LP, but the Side One glued-on label lying on the vinyl itself on both the Mono and Stereo versions of the album. It likely didn’t matter much, as they sold multi-millions of copies after the snafu. If the Beatles hadn’t proven themselves as stars already, this movie and the music contained in it and the soundtrack would make them icons. Beatles collectors know that any little difference like spellings or any other anomaly in the grooves enhances the value of a record. I’d like to feature the mis-spelled song by those lovable Mop-Tops that was cut from the youth-quaking film because the director, Richard Lester simply didn’t like the song for use in the flick. Lennon and McCartney had penned the tune for the movie, and even though it wasn’t used, it made it onto the soundtrack anyway.

For many, the film A Hard Day’s Night helped ignite this new so-called “Kingdom of Youth.” If you were a pre-teen or a teenager in 1964, you likely went to a hot movie theater (perhaps more than once) to see “The Boys.” This was the 10th of what would become a 14-week reign on the Top LPs chart in the U.S. Considering that the British version of the album (with many more songs) was only their third LP, the Fab Four established themselves as the “Sons of the Goon Show” as John Lennon once said regarding their acting in this film. The Goon Show was something Lester directed with Peter Sellers and his then partners Spike Mulligan and Harry Secombe that the Beatles all saw on television in the ‘50s. American’s called the film a cross between the Marx Brothers and the Little Rascals (or Our Gang) comedies. 

 

**NOTE:

There were NO Hot R&B LPs charts published by Billboard between 11/30/63 & 1/23/65. In addition, Cashbox magazine did not have an R&B LPs listing at this time.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

September 26, 1970

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘70:

No. 5 (LW 5) “JULIE, DO YOU LOVE ME”

Bobby Sherman METROMEDIA194

No. 4 (LW 4) “PATCHES”

Clarence Carter ATLANTIC2748

No. 3 (LW 3) “LOOKIN’ OUT MY BACK DOOR” / “LONG AS I CAN SEE THE LIGHT”

Creedence Clearwater Revival FANTASY641

No. 2 (LW 2)“WAR”

Edwin Starr GORDY7101

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“AIN’T NO MOUNTAIN HIGH ENOUGH”

Diana Ross

MOTOWN RECORDS1169

 

This is the second of an eventual three consecutive weeks in the No. 1 position on the Hot 100 Singles chart for Diana Ross, with a totally revamped version of the Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell hit from ’67, “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” This composition, written by Nicholas Ashford and Valerie Simpson, featured them as backing singers on the track (along with the never credited but much used female vocalists the Andantes) a guy named Jimmy Beavers as well as the producers of this version, Ashford and Simpson. The original was produced by Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol. This new adaptation was substantially longer on the LP called Diana Ross (of course) but was edited for release as a 45 RPM after radio stations began cutting it down to around three minutes themselves. Here’s a live version of the song by Ms. Ross.

  

Motown’s founder Berry Gordy, Jr. was originally reluctant to release the track as he simply didn’t care for the spoken-word pieces of the song and thought it should open more strongly. He was occasionally wrong about his selections. This one was a BIG blunder initially. But when he saw that others disagreed (especially the public) he relented.

   

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘70

 

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“SNOWBIRD”

Anne Murray

CAPITOL RECORDS – 2738

 

This week in 1970, Anne Murray was enjoying her first major hit with “Snowbird” sitting at No. 1 on the Easy Listening Singles chart for the fifth of six back-to-back survey periods on that listing on Capitol Records. The song was released on a Canadian-only LP called This Way Is My Way in 1969. Capitol decided to release the song as a single almost a year later (as well as the LP) climaxing as the biggest Easy Listening song; reaching No. 8 on the Hot 100 and even reached No. 10 on the Country register as well. That trifecta of chart-listings would serve Murray well through her recording career. Here she is with a hair-do before mullets were even called mullets.

Anne Murray’s first couple of albums contained a lot of material from either current or former folk songwriters, with this tune written by a Canadian named Gene MacLellan; also known for the Gospel/Pop hit by Ocean called “Put Your Hand In The Hand” which was an even bigger chart hit in America than it was in their native country. Anne Murray had already recorded “Put Your Hand In The Hand” (before the Toronto-based group had their U.S. No. 2 Hot 100 and No. 4 Easy Listening remake) for her third titled Honey, Wheat and Laughter. It would take Murray another three years to have another Top 10 Pop hit in the U.S. with the Kenny Loggins’ song (No. 7 Pop) “Danny’s Song.” MacLellan won a Juno Award in ’71 as Canada’s best songwriter. He died in 1995.  

 

BEST SELLING SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘70

No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“DON’T PLAY THAT SONG (YOU LIED”

Aretha Franklin

ATLANTIC RECORDS2751

This remake of a Ben E. King 1962 hit called “Don’t Play That Song (You Lied)” by Aretha Franklin was at the height of the Hot Soul Singles chart for the third consecutive and concluding week in 1970. The Queen of Soul’s album called Spirit In The Dark, featured this song and the title-track, released as a single before this week’s big hit) on Atlantic Records. “Don’t Play That Song (You Lied)” attained a peak position of No. 11 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was a certified million-selling 45 RPM.  

That track was co-written by Atlantic Records co-founder Ahmet Ertegun and Betty Nelson, Ben E. King’s wife, and on the Franklin version featured the Atlantic Records house band; a group that became known as the Dixie Flyers as instrumentalists. They would play on many artists’ albums, and were the musicians on Rita Coolidge’s and Kris Kristofferson’s records. The Aretha LP Spirit In The Dark also utilized some of the most revered session cats including: Duane Allman, Cornell Dupree and others.  

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

September 26, 1970

TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘70:

No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week No. 1)

“COSMO’S FACTORY

Creedence Clearwater Revival

FANTASY RECORDS8402

The biggest album this week in 1970 on the Top LPs chart was in its sixth of an ultimate nine weeks at the peak for Creedence Clearwater Revival with their most successful studio album ever, Cosmo’s Factory. This Fantasy Records LP release went to No. 1 based on the strength of the third single from the set; the dual-sided hit ‘Lookin’ Out My Back Door” backed with “Long As I Can See The Light.” Due to new methodology by Billboard Magazine that lasted only just under two years, both songs reached No. 2 on the Hot 100 Singles chart.

CCR had already been launched two singles (four songs) before the album was released on July 25, 1970; both dual-sided combined chart hits “Travelin’ Band” b/w “Who’ll Stop The Rain” a two-million seller (No. 2 Pop) and “Up Around The Bend” b/w “Run Through The Jungle,” (No. 4 Pop) a million-seller. So, all four tunes were familiar to CCR fans even before Cosmo’s Factory was unleashed to their rabid fans. With that third single, both AM Top 40 radio listeners along with Progressive Rock aficionados latched-on to make Cosmo’s Factory their most successful release. It’s been noted that Creedence Clearwater Revival never had a No. 1 hit on the Hot 100 Singles chart. That almost seems impossible, given that five of their singles sold over two-million each and another five sold over one-million. But at the time, the charts were filled with such a wide variety of new music from some of a generation’s biggest stars, reaching No. 1 was not the most important a goal. Hey, the album sold over four million copies. And did you know that Cosmo’s Factory was the name of the band’s practicing studio originally in Doug “Cosmo” Clifford’s back yard shed? They moved to a bigger location in their native Northern California when they began having hits, but still called it Cosmo’s Factory. CCR (as they were commonly known) was comprised of John Fogerty on lead guitar, his brother Tom on rhythm guitar, Doug Clifford on drums and Stu Cook on bass guitar. Tom died in 1990 after having back surgery, necessitating a blood transfusion that was unfortunately tainted with the AIDS virus. Creedence Clearwater Revival was inducted into the class of ’93 of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Will they ever reunite? Not if you ask Doug Clifford and Stu Cook. Fogerty says it’s possible. Do YOU think they will? Write me at BigJay@BigJaySorensen.com.

 

BEST SELLING R&B LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘70

No. 1  

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

DIANA ROSS

Diana Ross

MOTOWN RECORDS711

 

Diana’s first single from her Diana Ross LP was, in a way, a disappointment by Motown’s standards, especially after all of the build-up of her leaving the Supremes and beginning a solo career. “Reach Out And Touch (Somebody’s Hand)” ONLY sold about a half-million copies; a meager amount compared to what her Supremes hits vended. But the song was seen as an anthem by many fans. This first solo single from the Diva was written by the producers of the LP, Nicholas Ashford and Valerie Simpson, who wrote every song on the album except one. Here’s “Reach Out And Touch (Somebody’s Hand)” from the album Diana Ross.

The Motown Sound was changing rapidly with the release of this lush piece of art. Berry Gordy was putting Ms. Ross center stage as he was also preparing his then lover for even bigger mass-appeal stardom in films. The lavish production on the album’s showcase song, “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” hit the summit of the Pop Hot 100 listing, and (next week) the Best Selling Soul Singles chart. (**See above.) This was the first of two weeks at the Best Selling Soul LPs chart for the album Diana Ross, replacing the second release by the Jackson 5, ABC, after being No. 1 the Soul LP chart for 12 non-consecutive weeks. Later, in the ‘90s, for European release on CD the album was renamed Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES 

For the Chart-Week

Ending

September 21, 1985

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘85:

 

No. 5 (LW 6) “DON’T LOSE MY NUMBER”

Phil Collins ATLANTIC89536

No. 4 (LW 2) “WE DON’T NEED ANOTHER HERO (Thunderdome)

Tina Turner CAPITOL5491

No. 3 (LW 1) “ST. ELMO’S FIRE (MAN IN MOTION”

John Parr ATLANTIC89541

No. 2 (LW 4) “CHERISH”

Kool & The Gang DE-LITE880869

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“MONEY FOR NOTHING”

Dire Straits

WARNER BROS. RECORDS28950

 

This is the first of three straight weeks at the pinnacle of the Hot 100 Singles chart for Dire Straits, with “Money For Nothing” on Warner Bros. Records. The British band had their biggest hit with this 45 RPM release. The tune is notable, in part, due to Sting singing the words, “I want my MTV,” which of course gained the accompanying video tons of play on the then music video service. If the guitar on the track played by group leader Mark Knopfler sounded similar to the sound of the instrument on many ZZ Top records, that’s because he asked the bearded player Billy Gibbons how he got that sound. He told Mark it was a Gibson Les Paul guitar plugged into a certain amp. Gibbons said that Knopfler wasn’t told much else and got the sound he wanted anyway due to an accident by a guitar tech, setting up the mics in the studio in Montserrat in the Caribbean. Mark says he wrote the song in an appliance store watching TV sets.

     

At the 28th Grammy® Awards, “Money For Nothing” won a statue for Best Rock Performance for a Duo or Group with Vocal, besting Bryan Adams, Eurythmics, Heart and Starship. The album Brothers In Arms also won the award for Best Engineered Recording Non-Classical for engineer/co-producer Neil Dorfsman. Sting got a writing credit on the song, because his short vocals on the track were actually the same melody as the Police hit “Don’t Stand So Close To Me.” Ok, sing that line to yourself. Now sing, “I want my MTV.” See? I’m always right.

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’85:

No.1

 

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)  

“CHERISH”

Kool & The Gang

DE-LITE RECORDS 880869

 

Four weeks (with one more on the way) for “Cherish” by Kool & The Gang as the No. 1 hit on the Adult Contemporary Singles listing this week in ’85. It would also peak at No. 2 on the Hot 100 Singles list, and No. 1 on Hot Black Singles chart just last week for a sole survey-period. What a remarkable turnaround for the Jersey City, NJ outfit that started as Jazz ensemble, then became a pure funk big-band. This mellow R&B ballad sound put the group into the mainstream in ways they may not have intended. In addition to “Celebration” (from the 1980 LP Celebrate!) the ultimate wedding-reception dance hit that even gets blue-hairs to dance, “Cherish” also became a marriage staple for newlyweds. Here’s the single mix complete with crashing waves used as sound effects.

After funky/bump songs like “Jungle Boogie” and “Hollywood Swinging” in the mid-‘70s, followed by a drought of hits, the addition of singer James ‘J. T.’ Taylor to the group in 1979 helped cement the newly refined Kool & The Gang- sound with “Ladies Night.” “Cherish” sprang from the LP Emergency which also contained “Misled” (No. 10 Pop & No. 1 Black) “Fresh” (No. 9 Pop, No. 1 Black & No. 1 Dance) and the title track “Emergency” which just reached No. 18 Pop. Taylor left the band in the late ‘80s trying his hand as a solo act. “Kool” is Robert “Kool” Bell, who started the band with his brother Ronald Bell.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’85:

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“OH SHEILA”

Ready For The World

MCA RECORDS52636

 

It would take a few more weeks to become the top song on the Hot 100 Singles chart in the U.S. (for just a week) and at the apex of the Hot Dance Club Play chart, but “Oh Sheila” by the group Ready For The World was already in the first of two consecutive weeks as the biggest hit on the Hot Black Singles chart. Some people thought “Oh Sheila” on MCA Records was a new tune by Prince, because of a similar sound and for the reason that percussionist Sheila E. was associated with the Purple one. Not the case on either rumor claimed the group.

Previous singles from the band reached the Top 10 on the Hot Black Singles chart, but the six-member Ready For The World had an international hit with “Oh Sheila.” They had a No. 21 Pop follow-up called “On Display” and charted one last time of the Hot 100 with the No. 9 Pop “Love You Down,” which attained the No. 1 position on the Hot Black Singles chart as well. Ready For The World disbanded in 1991 with lead singer/songwriter Melvin Riley striking out on his own. They reunited in 2004 with some success.

 

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

September 21, 1985

TOP POP ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘85:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

BROTHERS IN ARMS

Dire Straits  

WARNER BROS. RECORDS25264

Brothers In Arms from Dire Straits on Warner Bros. Records led the pack for the fourth of an eventual nine weeks on the Top Pop Albums chart. In addition to containing this week’s biggest single in America (**see “Money For Nothing” above) the album also included the second U.S. single “Walk Of Life” (No. 7 Pop) and “So Far Away” (No. 19) the last single to ever chart on the Hot 100 Singles chart for Dire Straits. Here’s “Walk Of Life.”

In addition to the Grammy® Awards the album won, the prestigious Brit Awards put on by the British Phonographic honored the record as Best British Album. The CD version was the first ever to sell over one-million copies and outsold the vinyl version of the album Brothers In Arms. In the U.K., the album is now the seventh biggest-seller ever. It was the top album in Australia for over 30 weeks. And in America, the set has sold over nine-million copies. For the recording of Brothers In Arms, Dire Straits were guitar wizard Scottish-born Mark Knopfler (his younger brother David had left the band by this point) along with John Illsley on bass, Alan Clark on keyboards, Guy Fletcher on synthesizer, Omar Hakim on drums and some drumming by a guy named Terry Williams who was ultimately not used for any other drumming duties except for the opening drum segment on “Money For Nothing.” Several session musicians contributed to the record, including horn players, the Brecker Brothers. Dire Straits did have another album in them with some new members. One track did especially well at No. 1 on the U.S. Mainstream Rocks Tracks chart in Billboard called “Heavy Fuel” in ’91. Mark Knopfler went on to a successful solo career, as did his brother David.

 

 HOT BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘85

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

WHITNEY HOUSTON

Whitney Houston

ARISTA RECORDS8212

  

This was the fourth of an ultimate six survey-periods to feature Whitney Houston as the standard-barer on Arista Records. This was Houston’s debut LP, and enjoying early success on the Hot Black Albums chart. It would become a No. 1 Pop album for seven back-to-back weeks from the week-ending March 8th through the week-ending on April 19th in ’86. The album was let out of the Arista vault on March 14, 1985; but it took almost a year to reach the mainstream chart-topping slot. This week in ’85, the success of the album on the R&B side was fueled by “Saving All My Love For You,” the second single from the album.

Houston would go on to have 11 No. 1 Pop singles on the Hot 100 starting with “Saving All My Love For You” and ending with “Exhale (Shoop Shoop)” in 1995. The album Whitney Houston would go on to sell over 13 million copies in the U.S. alone. Whitney died on February 11, 2012. 


**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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