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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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October 3rd, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 9, 1965



HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’65:

No. 5 (LW 6) “THE “IN” CROWD”

Ramsey Lewis TrioARGO5506

No. 4 (LW 2) “EVE OF DESTRUCTION”

Barry McGuire DUNHILL4009

No. 3 (LW 7) “TREAT HER RIGHT”  

Roy Head and the Traits BACK BEAT546

No. 2 (LW 1) “HANG ON SLOOPY” 

The McCoys BANG10013


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“YESTERDAY”

The Beatles

CAPITOL RECORDS5498


 

The Fab 4—well actually the Fab 1, plus strings—landed on top of the Hot 100 Singles chart in America once again this week with Paul McCartney’s magnum opus, “Yesterday” on Capitol Records. This was the first of four non-stop weeks at the helm of the Pop 45 RPM listing for this song, featured on the album HELP! in the U.K; but not attached to a U.S. LP until Yesterday And Today was released as a hodge-podge set on July 6, 1966. The song was not released as a single in Britain until 1976, as the group truly didn’t want it put out on a 45. Despite being ‘all-McCartney,’ the song was listed as being written by Lennon/McCartney. Years later, Sir Paul tried to switch the names, but Yoko Ono wanted no part of that; keeping it authored as it was agreed upon by the two back in the early ‘60s. “Yesterday” used a string quartet, with their musical score put together by producer George Martin.

Much was made at the time by music writers of the fact that McCartney did the song without the other Beatles; in essence, the first solo song from one of the boys. Actually, George Harrison, and perhaps John Lennon and Ringo Starr were in the studio while Paul sang and played his acoustic guitar according to Beatles expert Mark Lewisohn. And remarkably, the recording of “Yesterday” came directly after ‘Macca’ had recorded vocals for the group’s raucous song “I’m Down,” which was the B side of the single “Help!” If you know your Beatles, you realize that Pauly was screaming his lungs out on that track; then transitioned rapidly to the mellow ballad “Yesterday.” All those years in clubs and stadiums afforded Paul the elasticity of his vocal cords. The recording date (June 17, 1965) started with Paul singing lead on the quite folky “I’ve Just Seen A Face.” The diversity is astounding. McCartney holds fast to the story about hearing the song in a dream, and when he awakened quickly wrote down the melody. He didn’t record it right away, as he was uncertain he hadn’t copied from another songwriter. When no one recognized it, and he was certain he did not plagiarize the tune, he commenced putting it on tape. To give credit where credit is due, the string quartet was comprised of Francisco Gabarro on cello, Kenneth Essex on viola, and Tony Gilbert, first violin with Sidney Sax playing second violin. The American B side to “Yesterday” was sung by Ringo called “Act Naturally,” a song originally performed and written by Country/Western singer, Buck Owens. The tune was recorded with McCartney only singing harmonies two days after “Yesterday.”

 

 

EASY LISTNEING SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘67


No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“I’M YOURS”

Elvis Presley

RCA VICTOR RECORDS – 47-8657



Following a double-sided hit “(Such An) Easy Question,” (No. 11 Pop) and “It Feels So Right” and an EP (Extended Play single) with five other songs from the Elvis Presley flick Tickle Me, RCA Victor released “I’m Yours” from the motion picture. But as had recently been happening, that track was recorded in 1961 in Nashville, and was originally released on an LP called Pot Luck With Elvis a year later in ’62. It was included in the ’65 film Tickle Me and released as a single from the movie from Allied Pictures. Big Jay Record Pig Music Trivia® time… What is perhaps the only link between Elvis Presley and the Three Stooges? The answer is below.

Reportedly, the King of Rock & Roll had some I.R.S. issues in early ’65 and his manager, Col. Tom Parker, signed-up his star to do a quick money-maker film for struggling Allied Pictures. The songs were already in the can, so no new recordings needed to be made. Elvis was named the Top Male Star in that year’s Laurel Awards from Motion Picture Exhibitor Magazine due to this romantic comedy. The song “I’m Yours” was written by Hal Blair and Don Robertson, himself a performer on the song “The Happy Whistler” (No. 6 Pop) in ’56. Both co-wrote the song “Ringo” by Bonanza star Lorne Green, a No. 1 Pop hit in ’64. Blair contributed songs to virtually every Elvis movie from ’61 through ’67. So what IS the connection between Elvis and the Three Stooges? The same two guys Edward Bernds and Ellwood Ullman who wrote several of the Stooges short-subjects (a handful with Curly, and later his brother Shemp Howard) also wrote the screenplay for the Elvis film Tickle Me. Both knuckleheads—I mean writers—contributed to some Bowery Boys films in the early ‘50s. Bernds also directed the Blondie series of films with Arthur Lake and Penny Singleton.


TOP SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES

SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘65

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“I WANT TO

(DO EVERYTHING FOR YOU)”

Joe Tex

DIAL RECORDS – 4016

   

Joe Tex had his second No. 1 R&B single with “I Want To (Do Everything For You)” on Dial Records. This was the first of three consecutive weeks straddling the Top Rhythm & Blues Singles listing. After his breakthrough hit in early ‘65, “Hold On To What You’ve Got,” (No. 5 Pop and recorded at the FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama) this week’s crowning R&B single was his second appearance on the Hot 100’s Top 40 as well.

Joe Tex’s biggest hits (million-sellers) would come later in the ‘60s and into the ‘70s, including: “Skinny Legs And All” (No. 10 Pop) in ’67, “I Gotcha” (No. 2 Pop) in ’72 and “Ain’t Gonna Bump No More (With No Big Fat Woman)” in ’77 during the Disco boom. Tex’s real name was Joseph Arlington, Jr. He won talent shows at Harlem’s Apollo Theater and was originally signed to King Records in ’55; a year after he won the contests, as his mother wouldn’t allow him to get into a deal before he was 19 years-old. It took several record companies and nine grueling years before Joe Tex had a mainstream hit; finally on Dial Records. He would remain with that label for about 10 years. Big Jay’s fave Joe Tex 45 RPM was called “Show Me” a rockin’ soul record. The Texas native (thus is stage last name) died at age 49 of a heart attack in August of ’82.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 9, 1965


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

No. 1

Pop

LP


HELP!

ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK


The Beatles

CAPITOL RECORDS2386

In New Improved Full Dimensional Stereo


Ringo Starr once claimed, “If you look at pictures of us (during the filming of Help!) you see a lot of blood-shot eyes; they were red from the dope we were smoking. And these were the clean-cut boys.” The American release of Help! Original Motion Picture Soundtrack on August 12, 1965—a week after the Help! LP came out in the U.K.—was the chart-leader on the Top LPs listing in the U.S. this week in ’65, for the fifth of nine uninterrupted analysis-periods. The Capitol Records set is different from the U.K. version, which wasn’t truly a soundtrack, although it did include all of the songs in the movie and more. The U.S. adaptation only included the songs: “Help,” “The Night Before,” “You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away,” George Harrison’s “I Need You,” “Another Girl,” “Ticket To Ride” (a previously released single) and “You’re Gonna Lose That Girl.” Here’s “Ticket To Ride” including stunt-doubles on the slopes of the Austrian Alps.

George Harrison wasn’t too pleased with the filming of those outdoor sequences in Austria, once saying, “They took us to Austria, took us up a mountain, gave us our boots (that no one ever laced up) gave us our skis, said ‘turn over – take one. Action! – and gave us a push.” The remainder of the U.S. soundtrack was crammed with score music, conducted and written by Ken Thorne (who just died on July 9, 2014) plus instrumentals of Lennon/McCartney compositions, with a distinct spy-flick sound. Help! sold just over three million copies in the U.S.; a measly amount by several of their other albums’ standards. The primary British edition was initially released on CD in the U.S. in 1987, and has had two other re-mastered versions hit the record outlets and downloads since then.

 

TOP SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES

 LPs CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘65

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


THE IN CROWD

Ramsey Lewis Trio

ARGO – 757

The album called The In Crowd by Ramsey Lewis Trio was released on two record labels, because Chess Records in Chicago started Argo with the objective of using it as a Jazz label; and due to an crushing amount of material coming out of the their studios in the Chi-Town. The Ramsey Lewis Trio was namesake on piano, Eldee Young on bass and cello, plus Isaac “Red” Holt on drums. Those later two formed Red-Holt Unlimited after just one additional LP with Lewis. The In Crowd was recorded live at a nightclub named The Bohemian Caverns in Washington, D.C. in May of ‘65. The set was in the fifth of an ultimate 12 non-consecutive weeks as the biggest album on the Top Selling Soul LPs chart. Here’s the complete version of the title track from the Long Play. The single was substantially cut for Top 40 radio airplay. 

The song “The In-Crowd” was written by Billy Page, the sibling of the very talented arranger, Gene Page who later went on to bigger things working with many artists including the Maestro, Barry White on his hits. The song “The In Crowd” was already known by Top 40 and R&B listeners from a vocal version by the late Dobie Gray. His performance previously entered the chart in ’65, attaining the No. 13 slot on the Hot 100 and listed as “The “In” Crowd” on the tiny Charger Records label.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 7, 1978



HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES


THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

No. 5 (LW 5) “SUMMER NIGHTS”

John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John and Cast RSO906

No. 4 (LW 6) “DON’T LOOK BACK”

Boston EPIC50590

No. 3 (LW 7) “HOT CHILD IN THE CITY

Nick Gilder CHRYSALIS2226

No. 2 (LW 2)“BOOGIE OOGIE OOGIE”

A Taste Of Honey CAPITOL4565


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“KISS YOU ALL OVER”

Exile

WARNER BROTHERS / CURB RECORDS8589


This week in ’78, it’s the second of four ultimate survey-periods in the pinnacle position of the Hot 100 Singles chart for “Kiss You All Over” by the group Exile. Taken from the LP called Mixed Emotions, “Kiss You All Over” was written by Australian-native Mike Chapman (who had earlier produced and written for the band Sweet) and Englishman Nicky Chinn who co-wrote “Stumblin’ In” by Suzi Quatro and Chris Norman with Chapman. Chinn and Chapman had a lengthy resume filled with later hits, including: “Mickey” by Toni Basil, “Better Be Good To Me” from Tina Turner and “Heart And Soul” by Huey Lewis & the News. Exile was a group put together in Richmond, Kentucky and originally called the Exiles.

Exile was founded by J. P. (James Preston) Pennington on lead guitar and vocals. It was singer Jimmy Stokley who sang their monster hit. He died in 1985 at the age of 48. A follow-up single to “Kiss You All Over” called “You Thrill Me” only reached No. 40 on the Hot 100. After the next one “The Part Of Me That Needs You Most” flopped in America (but did well in Europe, it was decided that Country music would make them a living. And quite a decent living it was, with many No. 1 Country hits under their belts. Exile has had over 30 different musicians in the group since its humble beginnings in Kentucky.

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

 

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)


“LOVE IS IN THE AIR”

John Paul Young

SCOTTI BROTHERS RECORDS – 402


This was the first of two back-to-back weeks as the standard bearer of the Easy Listening Singles chart for John Paul Young with “Love Is In The Air.” The song reached No. 7 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. It also was a major hit down under and in the U.K and other European countries. Can you imagine the producer of AC/DC co-writing “Love Is In The Air?” George Young (no relation to John Paul Young) wrote it along with Harry Vanda. George is the older brother of Malcolm and Angus Young of AC/DC. **Note: Malcolm Young just announced he is leaving AC/DC due to early stages of dementia. Also to George Young’s credit, he was the co-writer of the ‘60s classic “Friday On My Mind” by the Easybeats from Australia. Vanda and George Young were both members of the Easybeats.

Now who is John Paul Young? Born in Scotland, he migrated to Australia when he was 11 years-old. His real name is John Inglis Young who started a band there while he was a sheet-metal worker near Sydney. He had some decent success in Australia and then in Europe with a song called “Standing In The Rain” and had a minor hit in the U.S. called “Yesterday’s Hero.” But it was “Love Is In The Air” that gave John Paul Young his only Top 40 Pop hit and only Easy Listening No. 1 in America. John Paul Young was named the TV Week King of Pop in Australia in 1978. “Love Is in the Air” won an award for Most Popular Australian Single and Vanda & Young won both Best Australian Record Producers and Best Australian Songwriters at the King of Pop Awards down under.  

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘78


No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“ONE NATION UNDER A GROOVE Part. 1”

Funkadelic

WARNER BROTHERS RECORDS54235


Funkadelic, under the auspices of George Clinton, had the No. 1 Hot Soul Singles chart-leader this week in ’78 with “One Nation Under A Groove.” If there was a FUNK chart, it would have led that list as well. The record did manage to hit the Club Play Singles list and the Pop Hot 100, peaking there are No. 28. Chart-wise, “One Nation Under A Groove” was the biggest hit of the year on the Soul register. This was the second of six eventual weeks at the crest of the Hot Soul Singles chart. Here’s George Clinton and Funkadelic with the song in a live setting.

The LP with the same name would become the Hot Soul LPs chart leader in a few weeks. Clinton grew up in Plainfield, NJ. His first big hit song was with his former Doo-Wop group the Parliaments called “(I Wanna) Testify” a decent sized Soul hit in New York on the Revilot Records label, reaching No. 3 on the then Top Selling R&B Singles chart, and No. 20 on the Hot 100. Locally (in NYC) that song got to No. 8 on the WABC Musicradio 77 chart and No. 6 on the WMCA Good Guys survey. Funkadelic and Parliament were interchangeable ensembles both led by Clinton, heralding a new sound by combining the searing guitar work in the style of Jimi Hendrix, with the soulful beats and brass of Sly & the Family Stone and merging rock with R&B/Soul music. He eventual blew-up the Parliament/Funkadelic monikers (and P-Funk as well) over legalities of having the same members in different outfits. He and 15 members of the groups were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in the class of ’97. That’s a stage full.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 7, 1978


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week No. 1)


DON’T LOOK BACK

Boston

EPIC RECORDS35050

 

Boston’s second album was not intended to be titled Don’t Look Back; but Arrival. The band’s architect, Tom Sholtz, discovered that ABBA had just beaten them to the name Arrival in ‘76 (which featured “Dancing Queen.”) In order to circumvent puzzlement, the lead singles’ title also became the name of the Boston LP, 8-track and cassette. The debut Boston album has been lauded as one of the essential rock-guitar records in history. The sales of that initial album, (released in August of ’76) went on to sell over 17 million copies in the U.S. alone; making it the 12th best-selling album of all time. This second release MERELY sold over seven million, which was seen as a letdown by Epic Records. The company was also dissatisfied that it took two years to put the last touches on this sophomore release; yet Sholtz claims he was rushed to complete the intricate album, filled with layer after layer of instrumentation and vocal harmonies by Brad Delp. Despite what Sholtz didn’t accomplish, the lead single “Don’t Look Back” became a top-five hit single and the album reached number one for two non-consecutive weeks. Two other singles from the album were released, including; “A Man I’ll Never Be” and “Feelin’ Satisfied”—with neither reaching the Pop singles chart’s top-30. Here’s the lead single, “Don’t Look Back.”

After this album, Epic Records sued Tom Sholtz as a third album wasn’t released in a timely manner. Sholtz won the case; yet it still took six years after Don’t Look Back for another Boston album to come into view. Meanwhile, various Boston musicians, including Delp recorded separate new material, with Sholtz holed-up in his basement studio crafting the next album. That third set wasn’t formally released until 1986 (two years after the song “Amanda” was leaked somehow.) Third Stage got off the ground after Sholtz signed with MCA Records with an authorized release of “Amanda” that was recorded in the early ‘80s! It was the groups’ only number one single. Third Stage was the first Compact Disc (CD) album release to be certified as selling one-half million (Gold) by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA.) Boston has sold over 31 million albums in the U.S. Singer Brad Delp committed suicide in 2007. A concert to honor him was put together by Sholtz and other former musicians who performed with Boston in the city of Boston later that year.

 

HOT SOUL LPS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


BLAM!

The Brothers Johnson

A&M RECORDS4714


As I’ve said before, when Quincy Jones is your producer, you have a pretty good shot at having a successful album. Quincy didn’t disappoint the Brothers Johnson, as they had the biggest album on the Hot Soul LPs chart this week in ’78. Real life brothers George “Lightning Licks” Johnson and Louis E. “Thunder Thumbs” Johnson—the Brothers Johnson had the best-selling R&B or Soul LP for this, the sixth of an eventual seven weeks with Blam!; an A&M Records. The lead track on the Blam! album was “Ain’t We Funkin’ Now.”

The Blam! album featured such luminaries as Toto’s Steve Porcaro, writer/producer/performer David Foster, jazz guitarist Larry Carlton, trumpet player Michael Brecker and singer Patti Austin among over a dozen others. Jones’ production put the funky grooves into a super package. Jones even lent his hand in some writing credits on the LP, as well as the Johnson brothers’ cousin and guitarist Alex Weir, along with David Foster plus Nicholas Ashford and Valerie Simpson. The Brothers Johnson had previous hits, including: “I’ll Be Good To You” (No. 3 Pop) and a million-selling single in ’76, “Get The Funk Outa My Face” (No. 30 Pop) also in ’76, “Strawberry Letter 23” (No. 5 Pop) another million-seller, and “Stomp” (No. 7 Pop) in 1980. All three of the above were No. 1 R&B hits. “Stomp” reached the No. 1 spot on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play listing in ’80. The Brothers Johnson continued to have R&B hits well into the late ‘80s. 

 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

October 7, 1989


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘89:

 

No. 5 (LW 3) “IF I COULD TURN BACK TIME”

Cher GEFFEN22886

No. 4 (LW 2) “HEAVEN”

Warrant COLUMBIA68985

No. 3 (LW 1) “GIRL I’M GONNA MISS YOU”

Milli Vanilli ARISTA9870

No. 2 (LW 4) “CHERISH”

Madonna SIRE22883


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 5)

 

 

“MISS YOU MUCH”

Janet Jackson

A&M RECORDS1445


The first single from Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814 was the No. 1 Hot 100 Singles chart leader this week in ’89 on A&M Records. It was the first of four back-to-back survey-periods for Jackson’s smash that was tabbed as the biggest single of 1989. The song was the first of seven from the album that would reach the Hot 100’s Top 5—a record-breaking feat. “Miss You Much” is the epitome of the ‘New Jack Swing’ sound.

“Miss You Much” was written and produced by the Minneapolis team of Jimmy Jam (James Harris III) and Terry Lewis; the hottest production team on the R&B scene at the time. Harris later served as the chairman of the National Academy of Recording Arts; (NARAS) most commonly known for the Grammy® Awards. Presently he is Chairman Emeritus. The duo has more No. 1 songs on Billboard than any other production team, including 16 Hot 100 hits and 26 No. 1 R&B sides. “Miss You Much” was the team’s second No. 1 for Janet Jackson; the first being “When I Think Of You.” Janet was given a co-producer credit on the album netting her the first ever nomination for a Grammy® Award by a female. The only song on the album not produced by Jimmy Jam, Terry Lewis with Janet was “Black Cat” produced by Jellybean Benitez. With the strength of “Miss You Much,” the album Rhythm Nation 1814 would be the No. 1 set on the Top Pop Albums chart later in the fall of ’89 for four uninterrupted weeks, and would be the best-selling LP/CD for 1990 on the potency of the six other singles released from the set; this despite the fact that it was not a No. 1 album during 1990! The title of Jackson’s album Rhythm Nation 1814 stands for a pledge for people to join a nation of social conscious positive people (who happen to like to dance) and the 1814 stands for the year Francis Scott Key wrote America’s National Anthem.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’89:


No.1

 

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“CHERISH”

Madonna

SIRE RECORDS 22883


It was the first of two successive weeks as the No. 1 title on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart for Madonna with “Cherish” on Sire Records. The track came from the album Like A Prayer and was the third single from that set. “Cherish” was based on Romeo & Juliet from Shakespeare, and directed to her then husband Sean Penn, and her devotion to him. We know how that turned out. The video to the track had some controversy attached to it, as the finned Mermen were viewed as sex-objects by Madonna; but depicted to actually to de-sexualize them. The Mermen were also viewed by some music scholars as gay characters in the video, depicting ongoing oppression of homosexuals. Straightforwardly, “Cherish” is about relationships and love.   

The black and white video was filmed on the beach at Paradise Cove in Malibu, California. “Cherish” was co-written by Madonna and Patrick Leonard who also co-produced the album Like A Prayer and other earlier albums including: True Blue, Who’s That Girl and the then future LPs I’m Breathless and Ray Of Light. “Cherish” was Madonna’s 16th consecutive Top 5 Hot 100 single; a record-setting feat. Madonna has been quoted as saying the song was one of the worst she’s written, but that she’s not a judge of what will be popular.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’89:


No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“BACK TO LIFE (HOWEVER DO YOU WANT ME)”

Soul II Soul

featuring Caron Wheeler

VIRGIN RECORDS

Paul Hooper, Simon "The Funky Ginger" Law, Beresford Romeo and singer Caron Wheeler wrote “Back To Life (However Do You Want Me)” from the British Duo Soul II Soul. Wheeler was the lead vocalist on this track. This single was the No. 1 song this week in 1989 on the Hot Black Singles listing. The tune was included on the Soul II Soul debut album called Club Classics Vol. 1 on Virgin Records in the U.K; but was renamed Keep On Moving here in America. The version that became the single was totally re-recorded and re-mixed adding the lyric, “However do you want me.” That line was reflected in the new full title.

Already a four week No. 1 song in the Mother-Country, “Back To Life (However Do You Want Me)” reached No. 4 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, and was in the top slot of the Hot Black Singles chart for just this sole week. Get it? Sole week? Soul II Soul consisted of many members over the years, but was the brainchild of a guy named Jazzy B.; real name Trevor Beresford Romeo. This guy started on the streets of London playing music from his sound system as a mobile DJ, and these days (because he was so popular) Jazzy B. is an OBE…or in English terms, a member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire—the lowest seniority of the Commonwealth System.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 7, 1989


TOP POP ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘89:


No. 1

Pop

LP/CD

(Last Week No. 2)


FOREVER YOUR GIRL

Paula Abdul

VIRGIN RECORDS90943

The album titled Forever Your Girl was almost a complete dud. From its date of release, to the week this album reached No. 1, 64 weeks had elapsed—which means the record promoters worked their tushes off to make it a hit album. The former L.A. Lakers Cheerleader (at age 18) and choreographer Paula Abdul had two initial singles stiff. “Knocked Out” and “(It’s Just) The Way That You Love Me” when initially released in 1988 didn’t catch fire with radio or the public. However, by the spring of ’89, the song “Straight Up” got noticed and became the No. 1 single in the land in February of this year; selling over a million copies. “Straight Up” (written by Elliot Wolf) sat at the crown of the Hot 100 Singles list for three straight weeks. Now, Virgin Records had to follow that up with another strong single. “Forever Your Girl” was picked, which featured a different mix than the version on Paula’s album of same name. In fact, there were several different mixes of the track in many formats, including: 12-inch re-mix single, 12-inch dub version and others. “Forever Your Girl” though only certified as a half-million-seller, was her second of what would be three-straight No. 1 songs on the Hot 100 Singles chart. That third back-to-back No. 1 song from the album Forever Your Girl was “Cold Hearted” (also written by Elliot Wolff) which reached the top spot on the Hot 100 the first week of September of ’89.

“Cold Hearted” propelled the LP/CD to No. 1 on the album chart this week in ’89—but just this survey-period. Next, after being re-issued and reaching the No. 3 position with “(It’s Just) The Way That You Love Me,” Paula hit the crest of the Hot 100 yet again with “Opposites Attract” during the second week of February 1990; listed as Paula Abdul w/the Wild Pair, who were Tony Christian and Marv Gunn. Paula would have two more No. 1 songs on the Hot 100 through 1991. Her hits dried up by the mid-‘90s, but she had quite a run.

 

TOP R&B ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘89


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

 

NO ONE CAN DO IT BETTER

The D.O.C.

RUTHLESS RECORDS / ATLANTIC RECORDS91275


Tracy Lynn Curry is his real name, but the D.O.C. is the stage name of the rapper from Dallas, Texas who sat in the top spot of the Top R&B Albums chart this week in ’89 with No One Can Do It Better on Ruthless Records. He had previously written material for the Gangsta Rap group N.W.A, featuring Dr. Dre and rapper turned actor Ice Cube. The D.O.C.’s album No One Can Do It Better was his only solo release, and featured Dr. Dre and Easy-E as producers. The opening track from the album is featured here, called “It’s Funky Enough.”

Notice the song samples a forgotten 45 RPM called “Misdemeanor” by Foster Sylvers of the Sylvers, famous for “Boogie Fever,” a No. 1 Hot 100 hit in 1976.  Curry was in an auto accident that crushed his larynx not long after the release of the album and has had to have many surgeries since the wreck. His album had contributions from each then current members of N.W.A. The song “It’s Funky Enough” has been used in many video games, including Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. The opening line spawned a phrase that is still used at ball games across the country; “Y’all ready for this?”


**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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