Tuesday, February 21, 2017 Page Options

BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

   Minimize




October 31st, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 5, 1966

 

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’66:

No. 5 (LW 5) “DANDY”

Herman’s HermitsMGM13603

No. 4 (LW 3) “REACH OUT I’LL BE THERE”

Four Tops MOTOWN1098

No. 3 (LW 4) “POOR SIDE OF TOWN”  

Johnny Rivers IMPERIAL66205

No. 2 (LW 1) “96 TEARS” 

? And The Mysterians CAMEO428

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“LAST TRAIN TO CLARKSVILLE”

The Monkees

COLGEMS RECORDS66-1001

A ton has been written about the Monkees, and the debate rolls on whether or not they should be in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Certainly, we’ve all gotten over the fact that for the first two albums they didn’t play any music in the studios. Many artists, including the Byrds, Paul Revere & the Raiders, the Grass Roots, the Beach Boys and perhaps hundreds of others either didn’t perform their music on records, or were augmented by studio cats. If you cast those aspersions aside, and you dissect the music, you may come to the same conclusion I did many years ago, that the Monkees were a darn good outfit—even though they were thrown together by Don Kirshner. They had some of the best songwriters on the scene at the time. In their brief time together, you can’t argue that they sold an enormous amount of records (more than the Beatles in 1967) and many of their songs still are loved today…including this week’s No. 1 song on the Hot 100 Singles chart; “Last Train To Clarksville.”

The song would only be at the pinnacle of the Hot 100 for just a week; with their biggest hit “I’m A Believer” to come a few months later and included on their second LP More Of The Monkees. Inspired musically by the Beatles song “Paperback Writer,” “Last Train To Clarksville” was indeed an anti-war song, written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart; who also produced the track. The groups’ debut LP was called The Monkees, would become the top LP in the nation in a couple of weeks. The only single from that album was “Last Train To Clarksville” which was released officially on August 16, 1966; four weeks ahead of the TV show also called The Monkees— debuting on NBC Television on September 12, 1966. The show was originally not meant to mirror the Beatles’ success with the film A Hard Day’s Night; but the comparison was inevitable. Truth be known, the idea to do a TV show about a rock & roll group was envisioned as early as 1960 by the producers. In 1965 (a year before the premier) those guys—Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider—had famously put an ad in Variety looking for potential cast members. The four they picked were: George Michael “Mickey” Dolenz, Peter Thorkelson a/k/a Tork, Robert Michael Nesmith and Englishman David Thomas “Davy” Jones. Of course, the Monkees did eventually wrestle away creative control of their music, but the TV show was only on for two seasons, lessening their chance at longevity. Another song from their debut album might as well have been a single; as the “(Theme From) The Monkees” (also written by Boyce & Hart) was played quite often on AM Top 40 radio at the time. Davy Jones passed away on February 29, 2012.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

Pop Standards

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“THE WHEEL OF HURT”

Margaret Whiting

LONDON RECORDS – 101


Talk about a blast-from-the-past! Margaret Whiting was one of the post World-War II era’s biggest female Pop singers from around 1945 through the mid-‘50s. It had been 10 years since she had anything that resembled a hit song, and that was called “The Money Tree” along with the Billy May Orchestra in 1956; reaching No. 20. Move ahead to this week in 1966, and Whiting had the biggest Easy Listening Singles chart record with “The Wheel Of Hurt” on London Records.

Margaret Whiting’s last hit song was an attempt at a full-blown comeback as a recording artist, only to be stymied by changing styles and tastes. But the song managed to stay in the No. 1 slot on the Easy Listening Singles chart for four consecutive weeks, with this being the first of those survey-periods. “The Wheel Of Hurt” was actually competing for sales and airplay with a version by Al Martino; with both 45 RPMs coming out at around the same time. The song’s lyrics were co-written by Charles “Hoss” Singleton, who also wrote the lyrics for Frank Sinatra’s famous hit “Strangers In The Night,” along with another hit for Martino, “Spanish Eyes,” with another Brill Building regular, Eddie Snyder. Ironically, Margaret Whiting’s father was also a prominent songwriter, who penned some of the most memorable songs of the first half of the 20th Century, including: “Hooray For Hollywood,” On The Good Ship Lollipop” and “Ain’t We Got Fun.” Margaret Whiting died in 2011 in Englewood, NJ.  

 

TOP SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES

SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“REACH OUT I’LL BE THERE”

Four Tops

MOTOWN RECORDS – 1098


Yet another Holland-Dozier-Holland masterpiece for Motown Records and Four Tops with “Reach Out I’ll Be There” sitting at the throne of the Top Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles listing this week in ’66. The melody was what first grabbed us with the flute and Middle-Eastern-type sounds, complete with the sound of whacks on two-by-fours surrounded by an echo chamber (actually the bathroom) at the Hitsville, U.S.A. studios in Detroit. Then, the Funk Brothers (the studio cats) and Levi Stubbs, Renaldo “Obie” Benson, Lawrence Payton and Abdul “Duke” Fakir smacked us over the head with one of their most stellar vocal tracks ever, augmented by the female group, the Andantes on the high note harmonies.

This sound was a departure from previous hits by Four Tops with its major/minor key changes, along with the mysterious sounds coming out of the basement studio in the Motor City. What stayed the same was the singing/shouting that became Levi Stubb’s signature sound. The song had already been the biggest hit on the Hot 100 Singles chronicle for two weeks; two evaluation-periods before becoming the chart-topper on the R&B side. This was the second and last week in ’66 as the standard-barer on the Top Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles chart. Fakir is the only original member of the Four Tops still with us.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 5, 1966


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 2)


DOCTOR ZHIVAGO

The Original Soundtrack Album

Music Composed and Conducted by Maurice Jarre

MGM RECORDSS1E-6ST

 

Many of you know what became the most memorable musical moment in the film Doctor Zhivago (filmed in Spain and not in Russia as many thought) became known as “Lara’s Theme” or as it became in the hit version “Somewhere My Love.” Actually, only snippets of “Lara’s Theme” were used in the score of the film—but it was used a number of times throughout the movie. The film won five Oscar® Awards, including Original Score by Maurice Jarre. The original movie soundtrack was recorded by the MGM Studio Orchestra. It was No. 1 on the Top LPs chart for this sole week in ’66 despite the movie being one of the biggest in cinema history. The Monkees saw to it (next week) to make the soundtrack see the peak of the chart for just that one survey-period.

That video version above (including snippets from the original Doctor Zhivago film) was performed a 1992 tribute to the film’s director, David Lean, conducted by Maurice Jarre with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. What became the hit record from the film was the Ray Conniff and the Singers version titled “Somewhere My Love (Love Theme from Doctor Zhivago)” on Columbia Records. The vocal adaptation had been presented to another MGM Records artist, Connie Francis; who had asked for lyrics to the main melody to be written by a Grammy® and Oscar® winner named Paul Francis Webster. Connie turned it down initially because she thought what Webster penned wasn’t hip enough. Her version eventually did become a hit—in Europe, but died a fast death here in America upon release. Webster passed in 1984, with the original composer, Frenchman Maurice Jarre, moving on in 2009.

 

TOP SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES

 LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


THE SUPREMES

A′ GO-GO

The Supremes

MOTOWN RECORDS – 649


Side One-Cut One of The Supremes A´ Go-Go was not the monster hit that Berry Gordy, Jr. required of the Supremes—his principal project at his Motown Records. “Love Is Like An Itching In My Heart” was the opening cut on this week’s No. 1 album on the Top LPs chart, but the song itself just squeaked into the Top 10 at No. 9. And it just got to No. 7 on the R&B singles list. But that track cooked with some of the best rockin’ soul ever done by the Funk Brothers, backed by The Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Maybe it was too good. Or perhaps the track was too ‘hard’ for Pop music fans. Either way, it’s one of Big Jay’s fave Supremes singles; minor key and all. But the next song slated for single release WAS the biggie that Gordy deemed compulsory; again written and produced by Holland-Dozier-Holland. “You Can’t Hurry Love” was not only rhythmic, it had lyrics geared toward teenagers to take heed before jumping in the sack; succeeding in making it a sure smash for the boss.

This was the third of an ultimate four weeks in ’66 as the biggest album on the Top Selling Rhythm & Blues LP chart. It’s kind of odd that this album would be a best-selling LP, as the two main singles from the set were hits earlier in the year. In the case of “Love Is Like An Itching In My Heart,” it reached its peak in early June and was only on the Hot 100 for eight weeks. “You Can’t Hurry Love” had a longer chart life (13 weeks which was average for a big hit at the time) but was No. 1 on the Hot 100 in the middle of September of ’66. All of the other tracks from the album The Supremes A´ Go-Go were remakes of previous Motown hits by other artists; and even included songs like “These Boots Are Made For Walking,” “Hang On Sloopy,” “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and even “It’s Not Unusual” the Tom Jones hit. But by this point, the Supremes could not only sell millions of singles— but also albums, with virtually nothing but filler cuts.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 2, 1974


HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

No. 5 (LW 6) “CAN’T GET ENOUGH”

Bad Company SWAN SONG70015

No. 4 (LW 5) “THE BITCH IS BACK”

Elton John MCA40297

No. 3 (LW 4) “JAZZMAN

Carole King ODE66101

No. 2 (LW 3)“YOU AIN’T SEEN NOTHING YET”

Bachman/Turner Overdrive MERCURY73622


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“YOU HAVEN’T DONE NOTHIN

Stevie Wonder

“DOO DOO WOPssss” by the Jackson 5


TAMLA RECORDS54252


The No. 1 song on the Hot 100 Singles listing this week in ’74 was Stevie Wonder’s fourth Pop chart-topper with “You Haven’t Done Nothin’” on Tamla Records. If it was politics you wanted, you got it in mega-doses with this track; squarely aimed directly at Richard Milhous Nixon and the U.S. government in general. So much so, that Wonder almost moved to Africa as a political statement. He thought better and stayed in the U.S. warts and all. “You Haven’t Done Nothin’” was written earlier in ’74 and was on Wonder’s LP called Fullfillingness’ First Finale; timely released on July 22, 1974, less than three weeks before Nixon resigned on August 9, 1974 as a result of assured impeachment and expulsion from office. The single’s official release date was two days before Nixon gave up power and Gerald Ford moved into the White House.

It’s almost certain Stevie Wonder’s song didn’t cause Nixon from jumping on that helicopter that hot August day with  victory signs flashing from both of Tricky Dick’s hands, but the song was symbolic none the less. The next single from the album Fullfillingness’ First Finale was pure Stevie, as other than conga player Richard Dzidzornu, Wonder played every other instrument including drums, Moog bass, harmonica, Fender Rhodes and piano on “Boogie On Reggae Woman.” That song peaked at No. 3 on the Pop chart in early February of ’75. Both singles from the LP reached No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles chart. Fullfillingness’ First Finale won Grammy® Awards for Album of the Year, Best Male Pop Vocal and Best Male Rhythm & Blues Vocal Performance for “Boogie On Reggae Woman.” **See below for more info about Stevie Wonder!

 

 EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘74

 

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“BACK HOME AGAIN”

John Denver

RCA RECORDS10065


While attaining the peak position of No. 5 on the Hot 100, this week’s Easy Listening Singles chart’s prime 45 RPM was “Back Home Again” from John Denver on RCA Records; his third chart-topper on that listing. Notable for using arranger and conductor Lee Holdridge, who first came to national notice for his collaboration with Neil Diamond on the music for his Jonathan Livingston Seagull soundtrack project, John Denver obviously liked what he heard and invited him to add ambiance to the album also called Back Home Again.   

The song “Back Home Again” was the first of an eventual three No. 1 songs on the Country Singles chart for John Denver, born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. His album of the same name had studio versions of “Sweet Surrender” and “Thank God I’m A Country Boy” that later became hits from a live album called An Evening With John Denver, recorded at the Universal Amphitheater in Universal City; later named the Gibson Amphitheater which closed in 2013. Also contained on the album Back Home Again was the tune “Annie’s Song” written from Denver’s then wife while he was on a ski-lift.  They divorced in 1982, with Denver reportedly almost chocking her and coming into her home with a chain-saw to carve up her bed. Fortunately he didn’t kill her, nor did he get to use the bed as firewood. Denver had other legal issues with drinking and driving, and later perished flying an experimental two-seat plane over Monterey Bay near Pacific Grove, California on October 12, 1997. Denver’s ashes were scattered in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. In 2011, he was the first person inducted into the Colorado Music Hall of Fame. Just a few weeks ago, John Denver received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Hollywood.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘74

No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“LET’S STRAIGHTEN IT OUT”

Latimore

GLADES RECORDS1722


What did Steve Alaimo and Latimore have in common? Steve Alaimo had some minor hits in the early to mid-‘60s and was a host and music director on Dick Clark’s TV show Where The Action Is, which he co-produced with ‘America’s Oldest Teenager.’ Latimore (real name Benjamin Latimore) had this week’s No. 1 hit on the Hot Soul Singles chart with “Let’s Straighten It Out” for the first of two back-to-back survey-periods. So, what they had in common was Alaimo produced the song on Glade Records.

Steve Alaimo was a principle part of the “Miami Sound” that grew into a mini-empire in the mid-‘70s, launching songs like “Rock Your Baby” by George McCrea, “Why Can’t We Live Together” by Timmy Thomas and most famously, helped put K.C. & the Sunshine Band on the map. The Tennessee-native Latimore had another Soul Singles chart hit (No. 5) with “Keep The Home Fire Burning” and just one more Pop chart his with “Somethin’ ‘Bout ‘Cha” in 1977, again produced by Alaimo.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 2, 1974


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week ?)


SO FAR

 

Crosby, Stills, Nash

& Young

ATLANTIC RECORDS18100


Together, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young had not had a hit single on the Hot 100 since the song “Our House” reached No. 30 on that list on Atlantic Records. Previously, David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash had charted with “Marrakesh Express,” and “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes.” With the addition of Neil Young around the time of the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair four-day concert in Upstate New York, they later released four singles, including: “Woodstock,” “Teach Your Children,” “Ohio” and “Our House.” Their first two albums were both huge hits. Crosby, Stills & Nash was a No. 6 album on the Top LPs chart, with Déjà Vu reaching No. 1 and selling over seven-million copies in the U.S. alone. A live album called Four Way Street was released in ’71. It too reached No. 1 and sold over four million in the U.S. alone. The group was none-too-happy with that live set. But a compilation album of studio tracks wasn’t released until the group had splintered into four mostly separate parts. So Far, was just that—what they’d accomplished as a group up to that point. Call it a money-grab by Atlantic Records if you will, but it certainly highlighted much of their most important songs, minus “Marrakesh Express” for some unknown reason. Graham Nash has said he thought a compilation album so early in their career was absurd. I choose to focus on “Teach Your Children” from this and the Déjà Vu album, featuring Jerry Garcia on pedal steel guitar.

David Crosby was on Twitter the other day saying, “CSN will tour if we’re lucky this spring.” Make of that what you want. Meanwhile a few weeks back, when showing off a guitar given to him by Stephen Stills, Neil Young said that, “CSN&Y will never tour again.” So I guess that leaves Young as the odd-man-out for the 3,973rd time.


HOT SOUL LPS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘74

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


FULLFILLINNESS’ FIRST FINALE

Stevie Wonder

MOTOWN RECORDST6-332


This album was a breathtaking venture for Stevie Wonder. He was sitting on top of the Hot 100 singles chart this week with “You Haven’t Done Nothin’.” The next single from the album Fullfillingness’ First Finale was pure Stevie, as other than conga player Richard Dzidzornu, Wonder played every other instrument including drums, Moog bass, harmonica, Fender Rhodes and piano on “Boogie On Reggae Woman.” The song peaked at No. 3 on the Pop chart in early February of 1975, later winning a Grammy Award®. (**See below.)

This week in ’74 was the fifth of an eventual eight non-consecutive weeks on the Hot Soul LPs chart for Wonder’s album. Both singles from the LP reached No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles chart. Fullfillingness’ First Finale was the first album by Wonder to reach No. 1 on the Top LPs Pop chart earlier in the year. The album won Grammy® Awards for Album of the Year, Best Male Pop Vocal and Best Male Rhythm & Blues Vocal Performance for “Boogie On Reggae Woman.” While not using a lot of musicians (as Stevie performed most of the instruments himself) a few name backing vocalists performed on this album; notably, Denise Williams, Paul Anka, Minnie Riperton and the Jackson 5.


THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

November 7, 1987


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:


 

No. 5 (LW 1) “BAD”

Michael Jackson EPIC07418

No. 4 (LW 6) “LITTLE LIES”

Fleetwood Mac WARNER BROS.28291

No. 3 (LW 4) “MONY MONY”

Billy Idol CHRYSALIS2543

No. 2 (LW 2) “CAUSING A COMMOTION”

Madonna SIRE28224


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3) 

 

“I THINK WE’RE ALONE NOW”

Tiffany

MCA RECORDS53167

 

Ritchie Cordell wrote “I Think We’re Alone Now” as the record that truly put Tommy James & the Shondells on the map after they had a fluke No. 1 song with a 1964 recorded remake called “Hanky Panky,” rescued from the cut-out bins in 1966. After “Hanky Panky,” James not only had to  scramble to find new Shondells, but had to come up with material. Two subsequent 45 RPM releases didn’t crack the national Top 20. Then, along came “I Think We’re Alone Now.” That got to No. 4 on the Hot 100 in the early part of 1967. Flash forward to 20 years to 1987. California girl Tiffany Darwisch had recorded a version of the song after producer George Tobin overheard her singing while he was producing Smokey Robinson in another studio. At that time, Tiffany was still 13 years-old. Tobin picked the song because he had worked with the songwriter Ritchie Cordell during his days in the Brill Building in Manhattan. At first Tiffany didn’t like the song calling it, “Old.” Well, that, “Old” record not only put her on the map in the music world; it made her the first artist born in the 1970s to have a No. 1 Hot 100 hit. This was the first of a two-week run in the peak position of that Pop listing. She garnered experience touring at shopping malls across the country (including the former Bergen Mall in Paramus, N.J.) before this song was a hit.

Interestingly, the song that replaced “I Think We’re Along Now” at the apex of the Hot 100 was also a Tommy James & the Shondells song—this time from ’68 called “Mony Mony.” Former Generation X Punk-Rocker Billy Idol had the very next No. 1 with a ‘live’ version of “Mony Mony” for just one survey-period. Idol’s original studio version was recorded in ’81, but never charted. Cordell was also co-producer and co-writer of “Mony Mony” as well; along with James, Bobby Bloom (of “Montego Bay” fame) and co-producer, Bo Gentry. Back to Tiffany—she had a follow-up No. 1 song for two weeks called “Could’ve Been,” along with a remake of the Lennon/McCartney song “I Saw HIM Standing There.” A follow-up to that stiffed, but the teen still had some mojo left in her recording career with a No. 6 Hot 100 hit called “All This Time” in late ’88 into early ’89. One more single called “Radio Romance” (stalling at No. 35) ended her hit-making abilities. When she became of age, Tiffany posed uncovered for Playboy and did some sporadic acting.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’87:

No.1

 

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“BREAKOUT”

Swing Out Sister

MERCURY RECORDS 888016


What does the English 1930’s character actor, later Merv Griffin Show TV sidekick and Fish & Chips namesake Arthur Treacher have to do with the British music trio Swing Out Sister? Beside their mutual love of the English food staple, the group got their moniker from a Treacher film from 1945 called Swing Out, Sister, also starring Billie Burke (Glinda, the Good Witch of the North in The Wizard of Oz) and cowboy and action star Rod Cameron. The trio called Swing Out Sister only settled upon the name because all three members hated it, and, upon agreeing on that, chose it as their trademark. Swing Out Sister had the No. 1 song on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart this week in ’87 for the first of a two-survey-period run. “Breakout” was the breakout single from their debut album called It’s Better To Travel on Mercury Records here in the U.S.


Call this music ‘Sofisti-Pop.’ The lead singer of Swing Out Sister was vocalist Corrine Drewery, along with keyboardist Andy Connell and drummer Martin Jackson. “Breakout” not only was No. 1 on the Adult Contemporary list; it reached a respectable No. 6 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was also a Dance chart hit as well. Plus, the song was an international hit. Their album It’s Better To Travel was a super mix of ‘electro-pop’ and Jazz that made it to No. 1 in the U.K. In America, the follow-up single was called “Twilight World,” taken from the album, reached No. 31 on the Hot 100 and No. 9 on the Hot Dance Club Play listing. Their final charting song was a vocal version of the song “Am I The Same Girl,” originally released in early 1969 by Chicago Soul singer Barbara Acklin, which used the exact backing track as the instrumental million-selling hit “Soulful Strut” (No. 3 Pop) made famous a few months earlier in 1968 by Young-Holt Unlimited.   

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’87:

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)


“LOVIN’ YOU”

The O’Jays

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL RECORDS / MANHATTAN RECORDS50084

Pop chart fans likely don’t know about this record, as it never hit the Hot 100 Singles chart. But it was the No. 1 song on the Hot Black Singles chart for the veteran vocal group, the O’Jays on Philadelphia International Records imprint, which was leased from Manhattan Records. Both labels were then distributed by Capitol Records after a long association with CBS Records. “Lovin’ You” has been reported to be the last No. 1 song written by Kenny Gamble and Leon A. Huff, the stalwarts of the so-called ‘Philly-Sound’ from the late ‘60s into the ‘80s. They also co-produced “Lovin’ You” that sprang from the O’Jay’s album called Let Me Touch You.

“Lovin’ You” was only on top of the Hot Black Singles register for one week; but it did replace “Bad” from Michael Jackson, so that in itself was a feat by the legendary vocal group. This single was the first true hit by the O’Jays in about nine years. By 1987, the O’Jays consisted of Eddie Levert, Walter Williams and Sammy Strain. Former member William Powell died in 1977. Other founding members when the group was founded included Bobby Massey and Bill Isles. The O’Jays got into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in the class of ’05; but not without controversy. Sammy Strain was included in the group’s honor along with Bobby Massey who had left the group in the early 70s. Sammy Strain had replaced the then ill Powell in ’76, but founding member Bill Isles was not included in the ceremony. So you know, Strain was a member of Little Anthony & the Imperials for many years; joining in the very early ‘60s. He’s one of a handful of singers inducted twice with two different groups into that Hall—with the Imperials as well for the class of ’09. He left the O’Jays and retired in 2004. The O’Jays also got invited into the R&B Hall of Fame in 2013. 

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 7, 1987


TOP POP ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 3)


TUNNEL OF LOVE

Bruce Springsteen

COLUMBIA RECORDS40999

 

Released on October 9, 1987, Tunnel Of Love, the much-anticipated follow-up album to Born In The U.S.A., was somewhat of a disappointment as far as the sales were concerned by Columbia Records. It ONLY sold over three- million copies as opposed to over 15 million in the U.S. alone. Bruce Springsteen stripped down the sound of this release, somewhat softening the sometimes bombastic sound of its predecessor. The E-Street Band was not credited on the album; only to have members of the band be known as backing musicians called mysteriously, ‘Shore Fire Media’ which later became the name of a publicity firm working for Springsteen and others. Much of the album was recorded in New Jersey in Springsteen’s home studio, and he has called the set his, “Men and women songs.” The lead single from this release was the intensely personal “Brilliant Disguise” peaking at No. 5 on the Hot 100 Singles list (for the week ending November 21, 1987), and No. 1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.

The next single was the title track, attaining the No. 9 slot on the Hot 100 and was also No. 1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks list. The third single was “One Step Up” (No. 13 on the Hot 100, No. 3 on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles register and No. 2 on the Album Rock Tracks chart. The Grammy® Awards gave Springsteen a Grammy® for Best Rock Vocal Performance for the album Tunnel Of Love.


HOT BLACK ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘86


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


BAD

Michael Jackson

EPIC RECORDS


This week’s Hot Black Albums chart leader was Bad from Michael Jackson. While virtually no album could likely top the success of Thriller, Jackson managed to have another multi-million selling album this week in ’87 on Epic Records, under the production tutelage of Quincy Jones once again. Jackson was given co-producer credit on the entire set. He had written nine out of the 11 tracks. Bad had previously been No. 1 for six consecutive weeks on the Pop Albums chart. The current single was the title track, sliding down the chart by this point in November of ’87. The third single had just been released this week on Epic Records. That song “The Way You Make Me Feel” would end up being the third consecutive No. 1 Hot 100 single from Bad for the week ending on January 23, 1988.  

Bad was currently in week number six of an eventual 18 non-consecutive survey-periods on top of this list. In fact, the album was No. 1 three different times on the Hot Black Albums chart. Subsequent singles included: “Man In The Mirror,” (No. 1 Pop) “Dirty Diana” (No. 1 Pop) “Another Part Of Me” (No. 11 Pop) and “Smooth Criminal” (No. 7 Pop.) The album Bad sold more than nine-million copies in the U.S. alone and over another 10 million globally.

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
);