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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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October 17th, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 31, 1964

 

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’64:

No. 5 (LW 2) “DANCING IN THE STREET”

Martha and the VandellasGORDY7033

No. 4 (LW 3) “WE’LL SING IN THE SUNSHINE”

Gale Garnett RCA Victor – 8388

No. 3 (LW 3) “LAST KISS”  

J. Frank Wilson and the Cavaliers JOSIE923

No. 2 (LW 1) “DO WAH DIDDY DIDDY 

Manfred Mann ASCOT2157


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 6)

 

“BABY LOVE”

The Supremes

MOTOWN RECORDS1066


Berry Gordy, Jr. finally figured out the magic mixture of blending R&B music with pop sensibilities for a mass audience with the pairing of the Supremes with the production/writing geniuses Holland-Dozier-Holland. Surely, the “Motown Sound” had been successful before 1964, but it matured and reached critical mass that year with a new ‘Sound of Young America’ emanating from a small basement studio in Detroit. This week’s No. 1 record on the Hot 100 Singles chart was the group’s second number one (of an eventual 12) with “Baby Love” on Motown Records.

“Baby Love” was the immediate follow-up to “Where Did Our Love Go” which sounded as if they were almost the same song with some minor alterations. The foot-stomps on those two recordings were performed by a teenager named Mike Valvano, who happened to be nearby the studio when H-D-H laid down the instrumental track with the Funk Brothers, Motown’s studio musicians. After being called the “No-Hits Supremes” by some impolite members of the Motown roster, the made their pop breakthrough with a song called “When The Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes” in late ’63. That song reached No. 23 on the Hot 100. Then, Holland-Dozier-Holland crafted “Where Did Our Love Go” and wanted the Marvelettes to record it. They simply said no. And frankly, even though they are now nominated for entry into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, imagine how big that song could have been for the Marvelettes! Maybe they would have been the female singing group that would go on to Pop music immortality. Instead, they ended up playing second or sometimes third fiddle to the Supremes and other Motown acts. The road to this ‘new’ sound coming out of Hitsville, U.S.A. wasn’t all rosy; because the ‘No-Hit Supremes’ didn’t like the song either. Only after the producers promised them “Where Did Our Love Go” would be a success (which it did) would they even agree to sing on the track after being told by one of the Marvelettes that it was a dud. However, for the Supremes, it was pretty much do-or-die. “Baby Love” was released quickly on September 17, 1964 after the huge success of “Where Did Our Love Go.” It only took four weeks for “Baby Love” to hit the heights of the national survey. That song would be a chart-topping smash for an ultimate four consecutive weeks in ’64; and in doing so, became the first Motown act to have more than one Hot 100 Singles chart leader.

 

POP STANDARDS SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No.1

Pop Standards

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“WE’LL SING IN THE SUNSHINE”

Gale Garnett

RCA VICTOR RECORDS – 8388


How many female singing artists can you name who came from New Zealand? I just heard a lot of crickets chirping. Well, this one did, via Canada. This week in ’64, Gale Garnett was benefiting from the six of seven consecutive survey-periods as the prime hit on the Pop-Standard Singles chart with the No. 1 song, “We’ll Sing In The Sunshine” on RCA Victor. Here’s Gale Garnett’s only major hit song in the U.S.A.

Gale Garnett transplanted from New Zealand to North-of-the-Border when she was nine years-old, and as a teen did some guest appearances on American TV shows like 77 Sunset Strip. She continued acting on Bonanza, Hawaiian Eye and others after she had her only major hit, “We’ll Sing In The Sunshine.” In essence a folk song that Garnett wrote, the 45 RPM also was a minor hit on the Country/Western Singles chart, and reached No. 4 on the Hot 100 Singles listing. Garnett won a Grammy® on for “We’ll Sing In The Sunshine” for Best Folk Recording at the 7th Annual Grammy® Awards near the beginning ’65. She moved on from her folky-phase and began singing psychedelic music to microscopic notice. But, if you’re an admirer of the 2002 film My Big Fat Greek Wedding, you’ll remember Gale Garnett in a small part as Aunt Lexy. In more recent times, Gale played a character named Daniela on the TV show Flashpoint in an episode in 2011.


 

**NOTE:

There was no HOT R&B SIDES Chart this week in ‘64, as Billboard Magazine stopped reporting this listing from November of ’63 through January of ’65. In its place, I have chosen the Cashbox Magazine R&B Singles chart to portray the biggest R&B single this week in ’64.

 

CASHBOX

R&B SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘64


No.1

Cashbox

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“LET IT BE ME”

Betty Everett &

Jerry Butler

VEE-JAY RECORDS – 613


Greenwood, Mississippi born, and Chicago-raised Betty Everett along with Chicagoan Jerry Butler had the principal single this week on the Cashbox R&B singles chart with “Let It Be Me” on Vee-Jay Records. The song was a remake of a French original recorded by Gilbert Bécaud, (he wrote the lyrics) with music composed by Pierre Delanoë. The first English lyrics (written by Mann a/k/a Manny Curtis) were recorded by Jill Corey for a 1957 U.S. TV show called Climax! Corey’s 45 RPM version only reached No. 57 on the then Top 100 Singles chart in Billboard Magazine. The Everly Brothers wisely picked up on the song to remake in 1960 on Cadence Records; their last single to be released before they signed with Warner Brothers. Their version reached No. 7 on the Hot 100. Flash-forward to 1964, when Vee-Jay artist Betty Everett desperately needed another hit song after “The Shoop Shoop Song (It’s In His Kiss)” reached No. 6 earlier in ’64. The chosen follow-up flopped. The next release teamed her with veteran Chicago singer Jerry Butler for “Let It Be Me.” That struck pay-dirt, with their duet reaching No. 5 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 this week for the second of an ultimate three atop the Cashbox R&B Singles list. ‘Baby Love” by the Supremes would replace it on the Cashbox list.

Betty Everett made that PBS appearance in 2000 with Jerry Butler, with it ultimately being her last public performance. Her final hit song of any consequence came in 1969 with a song called “They’ll Come A Time” which climbed to the No. 2 slot on the Best Selling Soul Singles chart, and No. 26 on the Hot 100. Cher’s cover version of “The Shoop Shoop Song (It’s In His Kiss)” put Everett back on the map and she made some concert appearances. Betty Everett died at her home at age 61 in Illinois during August, 2001. The “Ice Man” Jerry Butler, a founding member of the Impressions and another Mississippi born singer (inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame class of ’91 for his work with the group and a long-running solo career) served for many years as an Alderman in Cooke County, Illinois. He made many appearances as a co-host on PBS Doo-Wop & R&B music specials and still sporadically performs. I’ve met the Butler a couple of times, and he’s the consummate entertainer and gentleman.  

 

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 31, 1964


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week ?)


PEOPLE

Barbra Streisand

COLULMBIA RECORDS2215


Barbra Streisand’s fourth solo studio LP overtook the Beatles A Hard Day’s Night as the No. 1 album on the Top LPs chart this week in ’64. The Beatles had been in the pinnacle position for 14 back-to-back weeks. Streisand’s album People, on Columbia Records (her first No. 1) was in the first of an eventual five survey-periods as the leading Long Player in the U.S. This set featured the title track, with a newly recorded version that she originally performed on the Broadway soundtrack of Funny Girl as Fanny Brice. The song almost didn’t make it into the show, due to many songs being cut during previews, only to be re-added when audiences proved they loved Streisand’s rendition of the song on stage. In addition, the single had already been released by the time the show was set to open on Broadway in March of ‘64. Barbra won a Tony® nomination for Funny Girl but lost to Carol Channing for her starring role in Hello Dolly. “People” was written by Bob Merrill and Jules Styne.

The other standout track from the show was “Don’t Rain On My Parade,” which was on the soundtrack to the production, but not on the album People. The LP called People was released in September of ’64, but the single (recorded at Columbia Studio A in New York City) was laid to tape way back in January of that year. It reached No. 5 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 on the Pop Standards Singles chart at the end of June, into July of ‘64. The first take of the track was thought to be a clunker, because arranger Peter Matz (correctly) heard a bad note played by a French horn player. But Streisand’s vocal was so strong; it was decided by Matz and producer Robert Mersey to release it despite the flaw in the instrumental. The piano accompanist of the song and entire album was a guy named Peter Daniels. In a strange twist, Daniels was married to singer/actress Lainie Kazan (Streisand’s understudy in Funny Girl) with Peter becoming the assistant conductor for the play based on Barbra’s insistence. Lainie Kazan got to play Fanny Brice only once when Streisand got the flu. Kazan went on to acclaim with an acting career; including noted bit roles as Aunt Frieda on TV’s The Nanny, a tech-savvy Madam in Desperate Housewives and as Maria Portokalos in the film My Big Fat Greek Wedding.

 

**NOTE:

There were NO Hot R&B LPs charts published by Billboard between 11/30/63 & 1/23/65. In addition, Cashbox magazine did not have an R&B LPs listing at this time.

 

 

     

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 30, 1971


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘71:


No. 5 (LW 9) “THEME FROM SHAFT”

Isaac Hayes – Rhythm by the Bar-KaysENTERPRISE50370

No. 4 (LW 2) “SUPERSTAR”

Carpenters A&M1289

No. 3 (LW 3) “YO-YO”  

The Osmonds MGM14295

No. 2 (LW 4) “GYPSYS, TRAMPS & THIEVES” 

Cher KAPP45413


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


 

“MAGGIE MAY” / “REASON TO BELIEVE”

Rod Stewart

MERCURY RECORDS73224

For approximately 2 ½ years, Billboard Magazine’s Hot 100 Singles chart combined the A and B sides of certain singles and listed them together on their register. Both “Maggie May” and “Reason To Believe” shared the No. 1 spot this week; the last of five continuous seven-day survey-phases in ’71. Did you know the original music track on “Maggie May” did not feature any cymbals? That’s because the drummer, Mickey Waller, couldn’t find any in the studio; as he was used to having a drum kit provided for him. So, the hi-hat and crash cymbals were overdubbed some days later. That’s not as easy as you might assume. “Maggie May” is claimed to be semi-autobiographical by Stewart, as he claims to have had an affair with an older woman in 1961 at a Jazz music festival in a village named Beaulieu, in Hampshire, England. “Maggie May” was co-written by Martin Quittenton, who called Stewart from a phone-booth (pushed in by friends as he was reluctant to call) informing Rod-the-Mod of his melody. That’s future Rolling Stones member Ron Wood playing electric guitar and overdubbed bass on the track along with co-writer Quittenton on acoustic guitar. Ray Jackson (Lindisfarne) did the memorable mandolin playing and Small Faces (later Faces) member Ian McLagan played the Hammond B3 organ. “Maggie May” replaced what was the original B side “Reason To Believe” as the A side about six weeks into the run of the 45 RPM in America. Both tracks came for the Stewart-produced LP called Every Picture Tells A Story on Mercury Records. Note the words “Maggie May” do not appear in the song (only the name Maggie does) but was used because of the title from an old English folk song about a hooker. That different song appeared briefly on the Beatles LP called Let It Be, sung by John Lennon. And it would be Lennon who replaced Stewart in the No. 1 spot this week on the Top LPs chart. (**See below under The BIG Albums heading for ‘71.)

What eventually became the B side of the 45 RPM was “Reason To Believe” written by Oregon-native and transplanted New Yorker folk-singer/songwriter Tim Hardin. “Reason To Believe” was written back in 1965 and was included on the album Tim Hardin 1 released in ’66 on Verve Forecast Records. Another song from that album, “Don’t Make Promises” was the B side to the first hit by the Union Gap (featuring Gary Puckett) “Woman Woman.” “Reason To Believe” is one of the most recorded and performed songs by a myriad of artists with its beginnings in the Folk/Rock era of the mid-’60s. Hardin died at age 39 in December of 1980 of long-time drug issues. Here’s Rod Stewart’s original mono 45 RPM mix of “Reason To Believe” with Peter Sears on the piano.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘71

 

No.1

 

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“PEACE TRAIN”

Cat Stevens

A&M RECORDS 1291

The third U.S. single, “Peace Train” from Cat Stevens was No. 1 this week in ’71 on the Easy Listening Singles chart on A&M Records for the first of an ultimate three continuous seven-day survey-periods. The song had already peaked at No. 7 on the Hot 100 Singles in the beginning of October. The track came from the LP Teaser and the Firecat, which also featured the previous hit “Moonshadow” (No. 30 Pop) reaching the chart in late June along with “Morning Has Broken” (No. 6 Pop and also a No. 1 Easy Listening hit single) in the spring of ’72 featuring the unaccredited piano work of keyboard impresario Rick Wakeman. “Peace Train” was not released outside of the U.S. as a single, because his parent record European company, Island Records, wanted people to buy the album instead of a 45 RPM disc. A&M Records (which leased the album for U.S. release) thought differently. Teaser and the Firecat eventually sold over three million copies in the U.S. alone.

That’s Alun Davies on the guitar, a long-time friend and Welch musician, who worked for nearly a decade with Cat Stevens before he ‘retired’ from the music business. Now known as Yusaf Islam, and back to performing, then Cat Stevens thought “Peace Train” was the kind of music you’d hear on a Greek Island. His birth name was of Greek origin; Steven Demetre Georgiou, born in 1948. Just before his immense success in the early ‘70s, Stevens had come down with a case of tuberculosis, and was near death for a time, but recuperated for almost a year after many months in an English hospital. He’s had his share of controversy since his becoming a follower of Islam in ’77. He will release a new album called Tell ‘Em I’m Gone on October 27th, followed by a brief six-show U.S. tour in December; his first since 1976. He will NOT be performing in New York City, as he is concerned with scalpers, as NYC allows paper tickets to a show. The nearest venue to New York to see this limited tour will be in Upper Darby, PA, just outside of Philadelphia. The album’s cover will make reference that Yusuf is also known as Cat Stevens.

 

BEST SELLING SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘71

No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“TRAPPED BY A THING CALLED LOVE”

Denise LaSalle

WESTBOUND RECORDS182

Another singer who grew up in Mississippi and then migrated north to Chicago, this week’s Best Selling Soul Singles chart in ’71 was led by Denise LaSalle with “Trapped By A Thing Called Love” on Westbound Records. The 45 RPM was No. 1 for just this week, and also reached No. 13 on the Pop Top 100. LaSalle (born Ora Denise Craig) wrote the song that became her only million-selling single.

Since the death of Koko Taylor in 2009, LaSalle has been labeled ‘The Queen of Blues’ by the Jus’ Blues Foundation in Mississippi. The modern-day Bessie Smith, Denise LaSalle was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame for the class of 2011, saying she fell in love with Country/Western music as a child, but developed a love for the Blues later. The Blues Foundation Hall of Fame describes her as ‘The Queen of Soul-Blues.’ Whatever the designation, she is considered one of the first African-American women to produce her own records. Ya don’t mess with Denise LaSalle baby.   

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 30, 1971


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘71:

No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week No. 2)


IMAGINE

John Lennon

APPLE RECORDS

John Lennon’s Imagine album (recorded at his English home at Tittenhurst Park) was at the throne of the Top LPs chart for this sole week in ’71 on Apple Records. The three main musicians on the title track were: Lennon, longtime friend from his days in Hamburg, Germany Klaus Voorman on bass guitar and English rock drummer Alan White. The so-called Flux-Fiddlers (try to say THAT out loud five times fast) arranged by Torrie Zito did the strings, overdubbed in New York City. So you know I ended my last show (The Time Machine) on the old 66 WNNNBC-AM in New York City with that title track from the Imagine album on October 7, 1988. There were two reasons I chose this to be my last song. First was to honor John Lennon, as he had a profound influence on me; not just as a fan all through my teen years, but as a person who thought deeply about the world. Was he a leader? Not if you asked him. He was someone simply searching for meaning just like the rest of us. And the second reason was to honor a couple of guys who ended the Musicradio era on AM radio when WABC changed to a talk radio station in 1982. Ron Lundy and Dan Ingram, on that last music program said their goodbyes; with Ingram playing “Imagine” followed by the famous ‘Chime-Time’ jingle, followed by a few seconds of dead air. If nothing but a copy-cat, I did the exact thing, done precisely as Big Dan did it in ’82. The only thing different was the WNNNBC ‘chime-time’ jingle instead of the icon WABC version. If you search hard enough, you can find versions of both endings on the internet.

Back to the Imagine LP. It was released in the U.S. on September 9, 1971. This album was a lot more “produced” (by Lennon, Yoko Ono and Phil Spector) than Lennon’s first album called Plastic Ono Band, which may be the reason many find Imagine to be his finest moment as a solo artist. The album featured George Harrison on three songs, Nicky Hopkins on piano, Jim Keltner and Jim Gordon on drums (in addition to Allan White) King Curtis on sax and Tom Evans and Joey Molland from the Apple group Badfinger (called Tommy Badfinger and Joey Badfinger) on guitars. While the LP was largely recorded at his home in England, many overdubs and even total re-recordings of instruments were achieved in New York City…soon to be John & Yoko’s home base until he died in 1980. Imagine is a must-have if you’re a Lennon fan.  


BEST SELLING SOUL LPS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘71

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


SHAFT

Music From The Soundtrack

Isaac Hayes

ENTERPRISE RECORDS5002

 

Isaac Hayes’ milestone double album and the largest album ever for the Memphis-based Stax Records, was this week’s top Soul (R&B) LP in America in ‘71. Shaft was in the sixth of a decisive 14 weeks at the crest of the Best Selling Soul Albums chart through the conclusion of the year. Hayes’ album would replace John Lennon’s Imagine as the prime Pop LP in the first week of November; in that position for just a week. But Hayes owned the Soul LP listing. Hayes got captivated with the project when he assumed he was going to get the lead actor’s role; only to discover that actor Richard Roundtree got the part. Hayes ended up being an puny bit player in the final feature, but would go on to score the entire soundtrack featuring members of the Bar-Kays and his own gathering of musicians called the Isaac Hayes Movement. Each track for the album was re-recorded in Memphis at Stax, after Hayes wasn’t pleased with the audio studio made available by MGM in Hollywood. The song “Shaft” would turn out to be the number one Pop 45 next later in November of ’71 for a two-week run, but puzzlingly was never the chart-topping record on the Best Selling Soul singles listing.

The Shaft soundtrack was revolutionary in many ways. Hayes would later become the first African-American to be the victor of an Oscar® for ‘Best Original Song’ (a non-acting category) and was nominated the other pieces of music in the movie for ‘Best Original Dramatic Score.’ Hayes had even more awards handed to him at the Grammy® Awards given out in 1972; winning ‘Best Instrumental Written Specifically for A Motion Picture or Television Special’ and ‘Best Instrumental Arrangement’ awards. The trophy for ‘Best Engineered Recording-Non Classical’ accolade went to Ron Capone, Henry Bush and Dave Purple for the two-LP set. Most AM Top-40 radio stations at the time favored the edited version, which was not only shorter than the LP track, but polished out the word “mother” from the vocal track. Isaac Hayes had many ups and downs after this accomplishment—but the ups included a stint on New York radio and bringing to life the voice of ‘Chef’ on the infamous animated TV program South Park. Hayes died after suffering a stroke in his abode near Memphis after running on a treadmill on August 10, 2008.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

October 30, 1982


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

No. 5 (LW 5) “UP WHERE WE BELONG”

(Love Theme from “An Officer and a Gentleman”)

Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes ISLAND99996

No. 4 (LW 4) “I KEEP FORGETTIN’ (Everytime You’re Near)”

Michael McDonald WARNER BROTHERS29933

No. 3 (LW 3) “EYE IN THE SKY”

The Alan Parsons Project ARISTA0696

No. 2 (LW 1) “JACK & DIANE”

John Cougar RIVA210


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


 

“WHO CAN IT BE NOW”

Men At Work

COLUMBIA RECORDS02888

 

For the band Men At Work, it started out with “Who Can It Be Now” in America with the song sitting in the No. 1 slot on the Hot 100 Singles chart for just a lone week, during this survey-phase in ’82. The last couple of months of ’82 into the first several weeks of ’83 were owned by the Australian band, as their LP ruled the U.S. Top 200 Album chart with Business As Usual on Columbia Records from the second week in November of ’82, all the way into nearly the end of February of ’83; for a total of 15 consecutive weeks. The Thriller floodgate would soon open, but Men At Work were the rage just prior to Michael Jackson’s ground-shaking LP smashed all records. “Who Can It Be Now” along with “Down Under” were performed at 30 Rock on Saturday Night Live on October 23, 1982. The unusual record had long been a hit in Australia, where it was released on June 6, 1981. It took well over a year for Columbia to set the single free to do its work in America on August 13, 1982.

There is a sad ending to the story of Men At Work just two years ago. On “Who Can It Be Now,” Colin Hay’s lead vocal was augmented by the sax playing of Greg Ham (who would also play the insistent flute passage on the follow-up single, “Down Under.” Multi-instrumentalist  Ham was found dead in 2012 not long after the final appeal of a charge of plagiarism was denied by an Australian court for the flute riff on “Down Under.” He was reportedly despondent over likely being more known for allegedly copying that series of notes on an old Australian song from 1932, rather than the quality of Men At Work recordings, live performing and songwriting. Colon Hay still insists it wasn’t copied, and the heirs of the estate for the guy who wrote what was claimed to be the original ended up only getting 5% of the royalties. But it was enough to put Greg Ham over the top. The Business As Usual LP has sold over six million copies in the U.S. alone and reportedly almost three times as many internationally. The LP was released in Australia six months before being released in America. Men At Work won the Best New Artist Grammy® for the year covering 1983.  

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’82:


No.1

 

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“HEARTLIGHT”

Neil Diamond

COLUMBIA RECORDS03219


Given this song’s pedigree, it was a sure hit. Songwriters Neil Diamond, Burt Bacharach and his then wife Carole Bayer Sager put their noggin’s together for the song inspired by the film E.T. All three got producer’s credit as well. The track was arranged and conducted by Bacharach. A little known fact was that in order to even use any ideas from the film for a song, the songwriters had to collectively kick-in $25 grand to Universal Studios. How’s that for a licensing fee? That’s enough to phone home every minute of every day for 25 years if you own a smartphone!

The title track from the Columbia album also called Heartlight was enjoying its second of an ultimate four weeks as the standard-barer on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart; reaching a respectable No. 5 on the Hot 100 Singles listing. This would be the last Top 5 hit for Diamond. The idea for the song happened directly after Neil, Burt and Carole saw the film and went back to the couple’s apartment to come up with the simple musical statement. They must have clicked, as the three songwriting superstars wrote five more songs integrated into the LP Heartlight, including “Front Page Story” a minor hit in ’83 for Diamond.


BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’82:

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“LOVE COME DOWN”

Evelyn “Champagne” King

RCA RECORDS 13273


Evelyn “Bubbles” King was her initial moniker, altered to the more mature “Champagne” when she began having hits on RCA Records at the age of 17—still a bit young to be imbibing. Flash-forward to 1982; and Evelyn was still at it with a new producer and a new sound with “Love Come Down” although she dropped all of the gimmicky nicknames and was just plain Evelyn King by then.

“Love Come Down,” in its last of five consecutive weeks as the No. 1 song on the Black Singles chart during this survey-period in ’82, sprang from the LP Get Loose, (**See The Big Albums listing below) headed by a producer and songwriter for Evelyn King, Kashif—a/k/a Kashif Saleem, born Michael Jones. The former member of the Columbia Records-era B. T. Express co-produced that LP. Kashif was also the writer of “Love Come Down.” He also wrote the follow-up single called “Betcha She Don’t Love You” which reached No. 49 on the Hot 100, but attained the strong position of No. 2 on the Black Singles chart. Kashif went on to produce and write many hit songs including “You Give Good Love” by newcomer Whitney Houston.  

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 30, 1982


TOP POP ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


AMERICAN FOOL

John Cougar

RIVA RECORDS7501


This was the last album for the artist known as John Cougar. He’d be called John Cougar Mellencamp beginning in 1983, keeping the “Cougar” nickname (which he hated) until 1991, when he was simply John Mellencamp. American Fool was no stooge. The LP contained both of his biggest hits, “Hurt So Good” (No. 2 Pop for four weeks) and “Jack & Diane (No. 1 Pop) his biggest hit. Those two tracks had been hits earlier in ’82, so it was kind of a surprise that American Fool was still strong at nearing the end of the year. There was still another single lurking from the album called “Hand To Hold On To.”

“Hand To Hold On To” was just about to reach the Hot 100 for the week ending on November 6, 1982 and would reach No. 19 on that survey. This was the eighth of nine back-to-back weeks at the pinnacle of the Top LPs & Tape chart for American Fool. The album almost didn’t get finished, as Riva Records thought they were getting a sterile Pop album to promote. Instead, what they heard was something they didn’t know what to do with. The co-producer with Mellencamp was Don Gehman, who says he and John had put together over 20 songs, but the A&R (Artists & Repertoire) guy just didn’t like what he heard; almost dumping Gehman. Mellencamp somehow got them to let them finish the tracks and he was on his way to having an LP that would go on to sell over five million copies. I wonder if that A&R guy still had a job after he was proven wrong.  

 

BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘82

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)


Get Loose

Evelyn King

RCA Records4337

 

Get Loose was set free on the Black LPs chart, as it sat at the peak of that list for the second and final week at No. 1 for Evelyn King on RCA Records. King was discovered at the now being demolished home of Sigma Sound Studios (Philadelphia International Records) on South Broad Street in Philadelphia, where she was cleaning the facilities part-time with her mom. A producer there named Theodore Life overheard her singing in the ladies room, and when she came out (thankfully) he offered to get her a production deal plus a contract with the competing RCA Records. That first hit was “Shame” (No. 9 Pop and No. 7 on the then called Hot Black Singles chart) released in ’77 and one of the first four records inducted into the short-lived Dance Music Hall of Fame. Move ahead to 1982, and the hit that was still No. 1 on the Black Singles chart for its last of five weeks called “Love Come Down.” (**See above in the Big Singles list.) But lurking in the wings was another R&B monster hit called “Betcha She Don’t Love You.”

Except for drums and percussion, all of the other instrumental sounds on “Betcha She Don’t Love You” were expertly crafted by the song’s writer/arranger Kashif. He performed all synthesizers on the track, made to sound like real instruments with another-worldly dimension, much like Stevie Wonder did on his albums.  

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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