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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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October 17th, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 19, 1968

 

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’68:

No. 5 (LW 5) “GIRL WATCHER”

The O’KaysionsABC11094

No. 4 (LW 2) “HARPER VALLEY P.T.A”

Jeanie C. Riley PLANTATION – 3

No. 3 (LW 4) “LITTLE GREEN APPLES”  

O.C. Smith COLUMBIA44616

No. 2 (LW 3 ) “FIRE” 

The Crazy World Of Arthur Brown ATLANTIC2556


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“HEY JUDE”

The Beatles

APPLE RECORDS2276


Could the Fab Four be ANY hotter? Not really. “Hey Jude” was in the fourth of what was to eventually be nine consecutive weeks at the helm of the Hot 100 Singles chart. Plus, it would end up being their biggest chart single, ultimately selling over four million in America alone! Recorded during the time their double-album The Beatles (a/k/a the White Album) was put together, Beatles producer George Martin told the boys during the recording process that he thought the track was, “Too long.” John Lennon reportedly shot back with, “Not if it’s from us!” He was right.

The promotional film was broadcast first in America on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour on October 6, 1968 on CBS TV. By now, most Beatlemaniacs know the song was about Julian Lennon, and Paul McCartney’s poem to him as a result of the divorce of his father John and his first wife Cynthia. In the mid ‘90s, Julian won an auction of the handwritten recording notes about the track, claiming he didn’t even have many pictures of his dad with him; let alone much memorabilia. Oddly, “Hey Jude” did not win any Grammy® Awards for the song. However, “Hey Jude” was put into the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences Grammy® Hall of Fame in 2001. The B side of the single was “Revolution” (which John Lennon always wanted to be the A side, but was rebuffed by the other three Fabs) different than the slower version on the album The Beatles (The White Album) and quite loud by any rock records’ standards. Both sides of the single were released in monophonic, with the stereo versions of both “Hey Jude” and “Revolution” not showing up in America until the album Hey Jude (originally called The Beatles Again) hit the market in 1970. The pictures on that LP were from the last photo session the group ever had together on August 22, 1969. It should be noted that “Hey Jude” was not recorded at the EMI Studio at Abbey Road. It was done at the Trident Studios in London during two sessions on July 31, and August 1, 1968. “Hey Jude” b/w “Revolution” was among the so-called “First Four” Apple Records singles released on the same day.

EASY LISTNEING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“MY SPECIAL ANGEL”

The Vogues

REPRISE RECORDS – 0766


The over-the-top production re-make of the 1957 hit by Bobby Helms, “My Special Angel” by the Vogues, was their last Top 10 Pop hit (No. 7 on the Hot 100) but was this week’s No. 1 record on the Easy Listening Singles Chart. This was the first of two consecutive weeks as the leading 45 RPM on that list. Signed to Reprise Records in early ’68, the Vogues had their only million-selling single “Turn Around Look At Me” during the summer. That song also reached No. 7 on the Hot 100 listing. The original version of “My Special Angel” (written by a Houston, Texas guy named Jimmy Duncan) was a Country/Western chart leader for four weeks in ’57 by Helms, perhaps best known for “Jingle Bell Rock.” The Anita Kerr Singers backed Helms on his hit version. The Vogues rendition was radically different than the Country (Hot C/W Sides chart) crossover from the ‘50s; putting a schmaltzy production behind it, with impeccable harmonies and lush orchestration conducted and arranged by Ernie Freeman and produced by Dick Glasser.

Singing on this track and “Turn Around Look At Me” (which was originally recorded by Glen Campbell way back in ’61) were: Chuck Blasko, Bill Burkette, Hugh Geyer and Don Miller. There has been controversy about the members of the Vogues, with the original group hailing from just outside of Pittsburgh, PA (Turtle Creek to be exact) having to fight off other groups using their moniker. That story is too long and convoluted to get into here. But, back in the beginning, legendary Pittsburgh DJ, Porky Chedwick (the “Daddio of the Raddio” who died at age 96 in March, 2014) was one of their first supporters, putting them on his record-hop show across Western Pennsylvania with acts like the Dells and the Platters. Their first national hit was “You’re The One” which was a cover of the Petula Clark song, followed by “Five O’Clock” world and “Magic Town.” A few other minor hits followed until their label, Co & Ce (owned by Herb Cohen and Nick Censi—the same label that Lou Christie recorded for with his first hit, “The Gypsy Cried”) leased their masters to Warner-7 Arts and their Reprise label. The original Vogues were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2001, which is headquartered in Sharon, PA.

BEST SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES

SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“SAY IT LOUD –

I’M BLACK AND I’M PROUD (Part 1)

James Brown

KING RECORDS – 6187

While it reached No. 10 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, the historic “Say It Loud – I’m Black And I’m Proud (Part 1)” gained the prime slot on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles chart this week in ’68. This was the third of an ultimate six survey-periods for the King Records 45 RPM. The 45 of course had the “Part 2” on its B side. This socially charged record charted for just four weeks on both WABC and WMCA AM radio, pointing to the polarization of what was then considered a radical song from mass audiences. I do not have information on R&B station WWRL- AM’s Soul 16 Survey chart from this week. All of the above radio outlets were the leading New York City AM Pop and R&B music stations at the time.

Despite how it was viewed then by some music-lovers, it is clear by his songwriting that James Brown had enough of how African-Americans were being treated in the U.S. His personal struggles with record companies and nightclub owners are now well-known. But his rallying cry for Blacks was well-received in that community. The recording was done in L.A., with kids from Compton and Watts chanting the call (“Say it loud) & response (“I’m black and I’m proud”) phrase. This was the first record to feature Fred Wesley on trombone. It also included Brown’s legendary saxophonist Maceo Parker and several other hand-picked musicians. This wasn’t the last time James “His Bad Self” Brown would use his clout as a musical leader to call for self-sufficiency and self-esteem. The self-produced track was deemed so powerful, it was included on Brown’s ’68 holiday album A Soulful Christmas, and on an LP called Say It Loud – I’m Black And I’m Proud; released in early ’69.   

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 19, 1968


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


CHEAP THRILLS

Big Brother & the Holding Company

COLULMBIA RECORDS9700


Janis Joplin was invited to be the lead singer of the group Big Brother & the Holding Company in 1966 and she proved her worth with this week’s prime album on the Top LPs chart this week in ’68 with Cheap Thrills. This was the second of what would become eight non-consecutive survey-periods as the list’s foremost record. The Columbia Records album notes claim the LP was recorded at the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco, owned by the legendary promoter Bill Graham. That’s bogus on many counts, as just one of the records’ tracks was entirely live—“Ball And Chain”— a remake of the Big Mama Thornton tune; and even that was NOT recorded at the Fillmore. In actuality, it was laid to tape at Winterland Ballroom (an ice-skating rink) that year. The LP does feature Graham introducing the group, but that was spiced-in later for inclusion on the album. Regardless of the truths or falsehoods, the album had an energy that felt live. The comic book-style cover was designed by Robert a/k/a R. Crumb, an underground cartoonist, after the band (thankfully) was not allowed to have a naked picture of them on the LP’s cover. A notable cut on the Long-Player is the George Gershwin and DeBose Howard aria from Porgy and Bess called “Summertime”—one of the most remade songs in history. The hit single from the set was called “Piece Of My Heart” a remake of a song done first by Aretha Franklin’s sister Erma Franklin on Shout Records in 1967, written by the great songwriter Jerry Ragavoy and the celebrated producer Bert Berns.

Erma Franklin’s version of “Piece Of My Heart” did reach the R&B singles chart’s Top 10 in ’67 (No. 62 Pop) with her rendition being nominated for a Grammy® Award; only to be bested for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance by her little sister Aretha with her adaptation of the Don Covay composition, “Chain Of Fools.” For comparison purposes, here’s Erma Franklin’s original hit version of “Piece Of My Heart,” which perhaps you’ve never heard.




Big Brother & the Holding Company was formed at the birth of psychedelia in San Francisco by Peter Albin along with another guitarist Sam Andrew. They invited James Gurley to their group and then (after a short-time drummer) recruited David Getz as their new skin-banger. They knew they needed a tough vocalist and were introduced to Janis Joplin; fresh from Texas. She almost joined another group before being invited to be the lead singer of Big Brother & the Holding Company. The very same week that their electrified blues version of “Piece Of My Heart” hit the charts, another song the group had recorded earlier called “Down On Me” (not on this album) reached the Hot 100 as well on their former label Mainstream Records, most noted as a Jazz imprint. That track only reached No. 43 on the Hot 100, but itself is a Rock classic. It was Joplin’s manager Albert Grossman who told Janis to leave the band; but she didn’t need much coaxing as Joplin wanted to add horns to their sound, which the rest of the band vociferously (and possibly psychedelically) refused to do. Janis left Big Brother and the Holding Company not long after Cheap Thrills; originally titled Sex, Dope and Cheap Thrills; with that name being nixed by Columbia. Her next group was called Kozmic Blues Band. Joplin appeared at the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair in August of ’69 (she had been listed as a headliner) but was not at her best during her performance as it was delayed for many hours. To pass the time she reportedly shot heroin and drank alcohol, leading to her uneven set and non-inclusion in the film and original version of the soundtrack at her insistence. It wasn’t until her death in 1970 that her recording with the Full Tilt Boogie Band from her album Pearl called “Me And Bobby McGee” became her biggest hit posthumously. The Kris Kristofferson tune sold over a million as a single. Janis died of a drug overdose on October 4, 1970 at the Landmark Hotel in L.A. at age 27.  




 BEST SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES

 LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘68


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


ARETHA NOW

Aretha Franklin

ATLANTIC8186


The Good-lookin,’ Good-cookin’, Right-rockin’ Queen of Soul—Lady Re was taking pleasure in her sovereignty at the Throne of the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues LPs chart yet again this week in ’68 with her fourth Atlantic Records album, Aretha Now. The set was in the twelfth of an eventual 17 non-continuous survey-periods on the R&B LP chart. The biggies from this Long-Player were “Think,” (No. 7 Pop—after reaching No. 1 on the R&B singles chart for three weeks—and a million-selling single) with the B side of “Think” a restoration of Sam Cooke’s “You Send Me”—a small hit by itself. Also, “I Say A Little Prayer” (No. 10 Pop) and the Steve Cropper (from Booker T. & the M.G.’s) and Don Covay song (No. 14 and a million-seller) “See Saw.” That song entered the charts at around Thanksgiving-time in ’68. This song rocks—I just love this track—so here it is from Aretha Now.

Peculiarly, Aretha Franklin’s NON-LP single “The House That Jack Built” (No. 6 Pop and a million-seller) began its chart-run in August of ’68. As mentioned above, the other side of the 45 RPM “The House That Jack Built” was another hit; “I Say A Little Prayer,” eventually reaching No. 10 on the Pop side in the U.S.A. Aretha’s account of “I Say A Little Prayer” became her biggest ever hit in Great Britain. In fact, the British magazine New Musical Express gave the Queen of Soul’s adaptation of the Bacharach & David song the No. 1 spot by their critics as the TOP single out of 150 reviewed up to that date in 1987! That’s BIG. The album Aretha Now achieved No. 5 on the Top LPs Pop chart in America in ’68. The set was executively produced by Jerry Wexler, who supported Lady Soul’s extreme success by letting her compose and find relevant songs suited to her talents. Those triumphs were maintained by the incredible skills of engineer Tom Dowd and arrangements by Arif Mardin that stand the test of time on Aretha Now.

   

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 22, 1977



HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES


THIS WEEK IN ‘77:

No. 5 (LW 6) “BOOGIE NIGHTS”

HeatwaveEPIC50370

No. 4 (LW 3) “KEEP IT COMIN’ LOVE”

KC & the Sunshine Band TK1023

No. 3 (LW 4) “THAT’S ROCK ‘N’ ROLL”  

Shaun Cassidy WARNER BROS. / CURB8423

No. 2 (LW 3 ) “NOBODY DOES IT BETTER” 

Carly Simon ELEKTRA45413


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“YOU LIGHT UP MY LIFE”

(Original Theme from the Motion Picture You Light Up My Life)

Debbie Boone

WARNER BROS. / CURB RECORDS8455


Would you fess-up that you bought the Warner Bros. Records release of “You Light Up My Life” by Debby Boone, Pat’s daughter? Would you? Well, a lot of you had to have grabbed it off the shelves of the record departments at Two-Guys from Harrison, King Karol, E.J. Korvette, Sam Goody, K-Mart and even your local A&P. The song was number one for a shocking 10 weeks (this was the second week as the Hot 100 Singles chart-topper) and reportedly sold over four million 45 RPM discs in the U.S. alone! The SONG won plentiful awards and nominations. All of this came at a time when Disco music was stirring up a frenzy, California-style ROCK music was clicking on all cylinders and Punk bands were in their emergent stages of garage noise. A syrupy string-laden piece of mush sitting in the number one position for what seemed like perpetuity was as unlikely as a Bing Crosby song sitting there at that time. But alas, soft-rock didn’t die in the early ’70s as we thought. Joseph “Joe” Brooks (who would go on to have a unstable time late in his life, being accused of several sex crimes and in due course committing suicide in 2011 before going to trial) wrote the song for the film also called You Light Up My Life that he also directed, produced and wrote. And more calamities happened for his family, as Brooks’ son was convicted of murdering his girlfriend and was sentenced in 2013 to serve a 25 years-to-life prison term. But Debbie Boone had her ONLY number one and only top-40 Pop chart hit with “You Light Up My Life.” Why? Could America swallow a follow-up just as sappy? Likely not.

The song won Brooks a Grammy® for ‘Song of the Year’, along with a Golden Globe® for ‘Best Original Song’, an Academy Award® for ‘Best Original Song’ and other awards. Debbie walked away with JUST ‘Best New Artist’ from the Grammy® folks. Interestingly, the Best Song honors were NOT for Debbie Boone’s interpretation. That went to the original singer for the FILM version, Kvitka (or Kasey) Cisyk. She was a classically-trained singer whose real claim-to-fame was singing the McDonald’s jingle “You Deserve A Break Today”, and later, Ford’s “Have You Driven A Ford Lately’ commercial ditty and a slew of others. Brooks picked her because of those commercial chops. Cisyk died in 1998 of breast cancer. She was only 44.

Have you read enough yet? No you haven’t. Sit down. Debbie Boone married Gabriel Ferrer, the son of director/actor Jose Ferrer and singer Rosemary Clooney; which makes her a cousin via marriage to the actor and recently married George Clooney and his Jackie Onassis wanna-be bride. That would make almost anyone sick.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘77

 

No.1

 

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“NOBODY DOES IT BETTER”

Carly Simon

ELEKTRA RECORDS 45413


The biggest hit on the Easy Listening Singles survey this week in ’77 was “Nobody Does It Better” from Carly Simon on Elektra Records. It was the last of seven nonstop weeks at the apex of that listing. They pulled out the big guns for the theme from the United Artists James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me starring Roger Moore as Agent 007 and Ringo Starr’s future wife, Barbara Bach. Simon was chosen to sing the title track, the song was written by heavyweights Carole Bayer Sager along with Marvin Hamlisch, with production credits from Richard Perry; then quite hot as a producer of several big artists. Here’s a live version from Carly Simon.

Now here are the movie’s title credits with the song featured.

Interestingly, for the first time in the 007 history of films (this was the tenth one) the musical theme song for The Spy Who Loved Me had a different title than the movie’s name. Based on total weeks on the Hot 100, this was Carly Simon’s longest running hit; only reaching No. 2 on the Pop list. This was also her second No. 1 song on the Easy Listening Singles chart; her first was “You’re So Vain.” The song was nominated for an Oscar®, but lost to this week’s No. 1 Pop record, “You Light Up My Life” which also prevented Simon from having her 45 RPM become a chart-topper on the Hot 100. 

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“IT’S ECSTASY WHEN YOU LAY DOWN NEXT TO ME”

Barry White

20th CENTURY RECORDS2350


This was the fourth of an ultimate five survey-periods at the summit of the Hot Soul Singles chart this week in ’77 by “The Maestro” Barry White with “It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Down Beside Me. The 20th Century Records 45 RPM was sprung from the LP Barry White Sings For Someone You Love; his seventh album. (**Please read further details about this album in The Big Albums heading below.) Here’s the elongated “Disco” version of the song from a 45 RPM 12-inch 20th Century Records single.

“It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Down Beside Me” was co-written by a guy who must have been hanging around with Barry White for some time—at least back into the early ‘70s—as Ekundayo Paris had a single out on UNI Records, the same label he used on many of his early ‘70s hits with his female group, Love Unlimited. Paris was joined in the writing of Barry’s hit by Nelson Pigford. Here’s yet another nugget of Big Jay’s Record Pig music trivia, as Pigford was joined by a singer named DaEtta Little for a song on the Sylvester Stallone ROCKY soundtrack called “You Take My Heart Away.” Perhaps you’ve heard that. Oh…and Ekundayo Paris, mentioned above as the co-writer of White’s hit, also co-wrote the song “Sooner Or Later” (No. 9 Pop) by the Grass Roots in 1971. I know that was a lot of info to get to the point that there was a semi-decent pedigree linking those two writers to Barry White’s record that was No. 1 this week on the Soul Singles list, and also reached No. 4 on the Hot 100 as well. “It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Down Beside Me” was Barry White’s final million-selling single. He had a couple of certified half-million sellers after that. White died on July 4, 2003.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 22, 1977


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘77:


No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week No. 1)


RUMOURS

Fleetwood Mac

WARNER BROS. RECORDS3010

 

If it seemed like Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours LP was sitting at the crest of the Top LPs & Tape Chart for about half of the year 1977—you’d be correct. The Warner Brothers Records LP was released on February 4th of that year. This was the second album with the ‘classic’ Fleetwood Mac line-up of musicians, singers and songwriters, and it was benefiting from being in the 24th of an eventual 29 non-consecutive weeks as the principal album in America. The LP Rumours was rather auto-biographical; a comparative diary of the breakdown of the relationships with, in effect, all the members of the band. There was so much edgy strain; it’s amazing that they were even able to conclude work on what would become their foremost album. The then current single from Rumours on the Hot 100 Singles chart was “You Make Loving Fun” which ‘only’ reached No. 9 on that list. The song features Christine McVie on lead vocal, plus she wrote the tune; the fourth and very last single from the LP.

The album Rumours was the first LP according to Billboard’s chart to feature four Top 10 Hot 100 singles by a group, including: “Go Your Own Way,” (No. 10) “Dreams,” (No. 1) “Don’t Stop,” (No. 3) and “You Make Loving Fun” (No. 9) all in 1977.  Rumours won a Grammy® for Album of the Year, and has sold over 19 million copies in the U.S. alone; over 45 million internationally. 

 

HOT SOUL LPS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No. 1

R&B

LP

(LW No. 2)


BARRY WHITE SINGS SONGS FOR SOMEONE YOU LOVE

Barry White

20th CENTURY RECORDS543


Released in August of ’77, Barry White saved his faltering career with a new, less lush, but still sensual sound with the album Barry White Sings Songs For Someone You Love on 20th Century Records. This was the first of four non-consecutive weeks atop the Hot Soul LPs chart. As seen above, the lead track from the album was “It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Down Beside Me.” That track was not only No. 1 this week on the Hot Soul Singles listing, it would attain the No. 5 location on the National Disco Action chart in addition to its No. 4 slot on the Hot 100. A follow-up single sunk on the Pop chart, but “Playing Your Game, Baby” reached No. 8 on the Soul Singles register.

Another cut was released as a single called “Oh, What A Night For Dancing” which got to a respectable No. 13 on the Hot Soul Singles chart and No. 24 on the Hot 100. Barry produced and arranged every track on the album which, in addition to being No. 1 this week on the Soul LP chart, also managed to rise-up to the No. 8 spot on the Top LPs & Tape chart as well.

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

October 20, 1984


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

 

No. 5 (LW 2) “LET’S GO CRAZY”

Prince & The Revolution WARNER BROS.29296

No. 4 (LW 5) “LUCKY STAR”

Madonna SIRE29177

No. 3 (LW 4) “HARD HABIT TO BREAK”

Chicago WARNER BROS. / FULL MOON29214

No. 2 (LW 6) “CARRIBEAN QUEEN (No More Love On The Run)”

Billy Ocean JIVE9199


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“I JUST CALLED TO SAY I LOVE YOU”

Stevie Wonder

MOTOWN RECORDS1745

It took until this week in 1984 for Stevie Wonder to have a million-selling single according to the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) as they certify the sales. The reason for that is because prior to that point, Motown founder Berry Gordy, Jr. didn’t release sales figures. This gives “I Just Called To Say I Love You” a distinction among all of the dozens of Stevie Wonder hits, officially anyway. And even though Stevie was involved in two other certified million-sellers, it wasn’t as a solo artist.

So you know the only other two to be certified million-sellers were: “Ebony And Ivory” as Paul McCartney (With Stevie Wonder) and “That’s What Friends Are For” the AIDS benefit single from Dionne Warwick & Friends: Gladys Knight, Elton John and Stevie Wonder. Consider if you will all of the other monster hits Wonder has had over the years, and you would think that several of them WOULD have been listed as million-sellers IF Motown/Tamla/Gordy/Soul/VIP Records would have released those figures. The reason “I Just Called To Say I Love You” was released on the MOTOWN label instead of Stevie’s usual TAMLA Records, was the song was a soundtrack release from the film called The Woman In Red, starring Gene Wilder and Kelly LeBrock. Stevie eventually officially was moved from Tamla to Motown in 1987. The song won an Oscar® for Best Original Score and a Golden Globe® Award for Best Original Song. In addition to those recognitions, Stevie won a Grammy® Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, another for Song of the Year plus Best Pop Instrumental Performance for ’84. The album from the film The Woman In Red: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, reached No. 4 on the Top 200 Albums chart, and was the No. 1 album on the Hot Black Albums chart for the four concluding weeks of the ’84.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ’84:

No.1

 

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

AND

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’84:

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“I JUST CALLED TO SAY I LOVE YOU”

Stevie Wonder

MOTOWN RECORDS 1745


This was the second of three back-to-back weeks as the standard-barer for the Hot Adult Contemporary chart AND for the Hot Black Singles chart for Stevie Wonder with “I Just Called To Say I Love You” on Motown Records.

(**See above Hot 100 listing for more details.)

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 20, 1984


TOP POP ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1 )


PURPLE RAIN

Music From The Motion Picture Purple Rain starring PRINCE

Prince and the Revolution

WARNER BROS. RECORDS25110

 

Now celebrating its 30-year anniversary, the soundtrack to the movie Purple Rain (with the script starting out as being called Dreams) began its reign at the peak of the album chart, opening with the week ending August 4, 1984. Prince ruled the Top 200 Albums chart for the rest of the year plus the first two weeks in ’85; for a total of 24 weeks when was said and done. This week in ’84 was the twelfth of those eventual two dozen survey-periods. The five singles from this larger-than-life LP were: “When Doves Cry,” (No. 1 Pop and an over two-million-selling single) followed by “Let’s Go Crazy” (No. 1 Pop and selling over one million copies) his second No. 1 song from the double-album on the Hot 100 after being released as a single on August 11th. “Let’s Go Crazy” was still No. 5 this week on the Hot 100 and sliding down the chart after a thriving run. Then, the title track “Purple Rain” was quickly released a month and a half later on September 26th (eventually No. 2 Pop and also another million-selling single) hitting that high point in mid-November and featured here.

That title track was followed with “I Would Die For U” (No. 8 Pop) and “Take Me With U” featuring Prince and Apollonia (Kotero) in a duet (No. 25 Pop) the final single from the two LP set. The album and film are basically the life story of Prince Rogers Nelson. Purple Rain eventually won an Oscar® for Best Original Song Score (the last Academy Award® of that kind), and the album sold 20 million copies worldwide.

 

HOT BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘84

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)


PURPLE RAIN

Music from the Motion Picture Purple Rain starring PRINCE

Prince & the Revolution

Warner Bros. Records25110

This week in ’84 on the Hot Black Albums chart, Prince held the throne for the 14th of an eventual 19 back-to-back weeks. (**See the details above.)

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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