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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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October 10th, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 18, 1969



HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’65:

No. 5 (LW 3) “LITTLE WOMAN”

Bobby ShermanMETROMEDIA121

No. 4 (LW 2) “JEAN” (From The Pride Of Miss Jean Brodie)

Oliver CREWE334

No. 3 (LW 1) “SUGAR, SUGAR”  

The Archies CALENDAR1008

No. 2 (LW 5) “HOT FUN IN THE SUMMERTIME” 

Sly & The Family Stone EPIC10497


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 4)

 

“I CAN’T GET NEXT TO YOU”

The Temptations

GORDY RECORDS7093

 

The biggest hit in the land this week in ’69 replaced “Sugar, Sugar” and its four-week perch atop the Hot 100 Singles chart. “I Can’t Get Next To You” from the Temptations on Gordy Records sold over two million 45 RPM records; their first million-selling single since “My Girl” in ’64—if you discount their teaming with the Supremes for “I’m Gonna Make You Love Me” in ’68. The gritty tone of “I Can’t Get Next To You” was set by the introduction of people yelling; then being told to hush up and listen. That was followed with a crashing instrumental opening by the Funk Brothers, the Motown studio band. The explosive voice of former Gospel singer Dennis Edwards sealed the deal as one of the vocal groups’ best melding of semi-Psychedelic Rock with down and dirty Soul; with the rest of the ensemble getting brief lead vocals. This was their second No. 1 pop hit. They’d end up with two more in their long careers. “I Can’t Get Next To You” was not as socially-conscious as recent Temptations tracks had been. Instead, it was simply about a guy trying to gain the attention of a woman.

“I Can’t Get Next To You” was from the collectively-mindful Temptations LP called Puzzle People, produced by the guy who deftly brought the ensemble from stylish R&B sounds to the tougher side of Soul music; Norman Whitfield.  As usual with Motown (Gordy) LPs, there was filler material supplied by writers outside the mother ship. Songs on the LP included remakes of “Hey Jude,” “It’s Your Thing,” and even “Little Green Apples.” Another song that had been released from this set as a single just before “I Can’t Get Next To You”  was “Don’t Let The Joneses Get You Down” (No. 20 Pop.) Norman Whitfield and his writing partner Barrett Strong wrote most of the songs from the LP other than the remakes. Puzzle People reached a respectable No. 5 on the Top LPs & Tape chart, and was No. 1 for 15 back-to-back weeks from November of ’69 until the first week of February, 1970.

 

EASY LISTNEING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘69

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“IS THAT ALL THERE IS”

(From the Forthcoming Production of “International Wrestling Match”)

Peggy Lee

CAPITOL RECORDS – 2602


One of the most prolific songwriting teams of the ‘50s and ‘60s penned this one called “Is That All There Is” on Capitol Records from longtime songstress, Peggy Lee. Certainly one of the oddest songs to become a hit 45 RPM in the Rock & Roll era, Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller were inspired by a late 1800’s German story about disillusionment, written by Thomas Mann. It was Leiber’s wife Gaby who introduced Jerry to Mann’s writings; and it’s reported that she helped her husband with some of the lyrics of “Is That All There Is,” with some of those expressions taken directly from the 19th Century story.

Peggy Lee was born Norma Delores Egstrom in 1920 and was raised by her Scandinavian family in North Dakota. She performed on the radio for several years in that state, and was renamed Peggy Lee by a radio personality in the late ‘30s. She was picked up by Benny Goodman to join his Big-Band for a couple of years as his female singer. By the early ‘40s, Peggy Lee was a national star on Capitol Records. She was a regular on radio shows through the ‘40s and recorded for Decca Records for much of the ‘50s; only to return to Capitol. She not only sang but wrote some of her recordings. Peggy Lee also starred in a few films and won an Oscar® nomination, plus 11 Grammy® nominations; finally winning one for “Is That All There Is” in the Best Contemporary Vocal Performance category for ’69. Her recording was arranged and conducted by Randy Newman. This No. 11 hit on the Hot 100 Singles chart was on top of the Easy Listening Singles chart this week and next, and was the last charting single in her career. Peggy Lee died at the age of ’82 in 2002.

 

TOP SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES

SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘69


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“I WANT TO

(I CAN’T GET NEXT TO YOU”

The Temptations

GORDY RECORDS – 7093


This was the third of five ultimate weeks as the list-leader on the then called Best Selling Soul Singles chart. (**See above for more about this 45 RPM.)


 

THE

BIG ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 18, 1969



TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘69:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


GREEN RIVER

Creedence Clearwater Revival

FANTASY RECORDS8393


Creedence Clearwater Revival never had a No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 single, but they did have No. 1 albums. Green River was the groups’ third LP, and was at the zenith of the Top LPs & Tape chart for the third of four concluding weeks on Fantasy Records. The singles “Bad Moon Rising” (No. 2 Pop) backed with “Lodi” (No. 52 Pop) and “Green River” (No. 2 Pop) b/w “Commotion” (No. 30 Pop) had already been released and were hits earlier in ’69. These were the only two singles featured from the LP Green River. Here’s the title track, Big Jay’s favorite CCR recording.

How does the title Putah Creek sound? Well, that could have been the album’s name, had the group not chosen Green River instead. Putah Creek, and an actually camp called Cody’s Camp on a small river in Winters, California, was where the family of John (singer and lead guitar) and his brother and fellow group member Tom (rhythm guitar) visited as kids. In the song are remembrances that John Fogerty had of those childhood days. Other members of the group were Doug “Cosmo” Clifford on drums and Stu Clifford on bass guitar. The LP features songs written by John C. Fogerty, with the exception of the 1937 Blues song called “Night Time Is The Right Time” seen performed years later on TV’s The Cosby Show with the entire family lip-synching to a Ray Charles remake featuring the vocals of Margie Hendricks. Tom Fogerty left the Creedence Clearwater Revival in ’71, as he felt his brother hogged the songwriting and singing spotlight. Today, Stu and Cosmo have their own band called Creedence Clearwater Revisited, have refused to perform with John Fogerty since the brand broke up in ’72. John went on to have a sporadic recording and performing career amidst legal trouble with the owner of Fantasy Records Saul Zaentz, who passed away in January, 2014. CCR did reunite just once at Tom’s wedding in 1980. Tom Fogerty died ten years later, after getting AIDS after a transfusion at a hospital.

 

TOP SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES

 LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘69

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


HOT BUTTERED SOUL

Isaac Hayes

ENTERPISE / STAX – 1001

With just four songs on it, Hot Buttered Soul from Isaac Hayes was a surprise hit from Stax Records (on his Enterprise label) that was requested from Al Bell, the then new leader of the parent label. Stax had just lost its distribution from the big Atlantic label. Consequently, every artist on the Memphis-based company was ordered to record new albums as fast as possible. Here’s the lead track and first single from Hot Buttered Soul (in its original over 12 minute form) “Walk On By” the Bacharach/David classic originally a hit for Dionne Warwick.

Hayes had an earlier dud with his first album, and was ready to throw in the towel as a performer. Isaac was set to strictly stick to songwriting and production. Coerced by Bell, he recorded four lengthy tracks that appeared on what was then called Hot Buttered Soul. To the surprise of Isaac and the company, it sold over three million copies and literally saved Stax from going under—at least for another six years. This was the ninth of 10 eventual weeks as the prime album on the Hot Soul LPs chart this week in ‘69. Hayes passed away at age 65 in Tennessee in 2008. A portion of Interstate 40 just east of Memphis is named after the Soul Man.


 

THE

BIG
 SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 16, 1976



HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES


THIS WEEK IN ‘76:


No. 5 (LW 2) “PLAY THAT FUNKY MUSIC”

Wild Cherry EPIC50225

No. 4 (LW 5) “IF YOU LEAVE ME NOW”

Chicago COLUMBIA10390

No. 3 (LW 3) “LOWDOWN

Boz Scaggs COLUMBIA10367

No. 2 (LW 1)“A FIFTH OF BEETHOVEN”

Walter Murphy & The Big Apple Band PRIVATE STOCK45,073


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 4)

 

“DISCO DUCK (Part 1)

Rick Dees

And His Cast Of Idiots

FRETONE RECORDS040

(Nationally distributed by

RSO RECORDS857


The prior four No. 1 songs on the Hot 100 Singles chart were dance or Disco oriented, so Rick Dees was simply riding a wave, and a bit ahead of the curve with a parody of the craze called “Disco Duck (Part 1)” on RSO Records. This record sold over two-million copies in the U.S. alone. Dees was and is a radio/TV personality. He recorded this song on a lark while he was a DJ in Memphis, Tennessee on one of the former partners of Stax Records, Estelle Axton’s Fretone Records label. Axton was the ‘AX’ in Stax. Her husband Jim Stewart was the ‘ST’ in Stax. Estelle had sold her interest in Stax in 1970, and after a non-compete clause lapsed, she released “Disco Duck (Part 1)” which, by far, was Axton’s biggest hit, after allowing RSO to distribute the novelty originally on Fretone. Estelle Axton died in 2004. Dees was a radio personality on WMPS-AM, and the song wasn’t played on his station (or any other station in Memphis, not wishing to give HIM any free publicity) at the time. Dees himself was terminated by his station for simply mentioning “Disco Duck” on the air. I suppose they were afraid of Play-Ola. I may be fired for even writing about this song, as Dees is working for syndication radio company in California. I triple-duck dare you.

Rick Dees’ real name is Rigdon Osmond Dees III. He was born in 1950 in Jacksonville, Florida. Rick had to come up with a follow-up after his No. 1 record (in that spot for just one week) and he chose another Disco-themed tune he also wrote fittingly called “Dis-Gorilla (Part 1).” You know that flopped (No. 56 Pop) plus, he had another novelty song in ’84 on Atlantic Records called “Eat My Shorts” (No. 75 Pop) without his ‘Gang of Idiots.’ Its unlikely Dees cared, as he had a hugely successful radio and TV career in L.A. after his stay in Memphis.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘76

 

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“FERNANDO”

ABBA

ATLANTIC RECORDS3346

This was the sixth American single for the Swedish outfit called ABBA with “Fernando” on Atlantic Records the top song on the Easy Listening Singles chart this week in ’76. ABBA is a palindrome standing for Agnetha, Bjorn, Benny and Anni-Frid; the first names of the group. In fact the song (originally recorded in Swedish) was at first a solo song from Anni-Frid (Frida) Lyngstad. It had appeared on her solo album in 1975 called Frida Alone or in Swedish Frida ensame. It was not released as a single; a ploy to make Swedes buy long-player. Here’s the group’s English version of “Fernando,” which peaked at No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles register.

ABBA also recorded a Spanish version of “Fernando.” The English language adaptation was featured on the ABBA LP called Arrival, which also included their biggest American hit, “Dancing Queen” (No. 1 Pop and a million-seller) plus that 45’s follow-ups “Knowing Me Knowing You” (No. 14 Pop) and “Money, Money, Money” (No. 56 Pop) with all three peaking in 1977.  The group was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (Class of 2010) by Barry and Robin Gibb; but only were represented by AB. BA didn’t show up. Really. Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Benny Andersson were the only two members on the stage accepting the award that evening at the Waldorf-Astoria in NYC. Agnetha Fältskog and Björn Ulvaeus stayed home. There’s a report that ABBA once turned-down a $1 Billion offer to reunite. Gulp.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘76


No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“JUST TO BE CLOSE TO YOU”

Commodores

MOTOWN RECORDS1402

 

The 45 RPM that sat atop the Hot Soul Singles chart this week in ’76 was “Just To Be Close To You” that says on the label was composed by L. Richie - Commodores. ‘L’ stands for Lionel Richie, of course, and each member of Commodores were given some equal percentage of the songwriting credits. This was the second and final week as this chart’s No. 1 song. “Just To Be Close To You” would reach No. 7 on the Hot 100 Singles listing. The album version (from Hot On The Tracks) clocked-in at a long 6:23; but the single was edited down to a radio-friendly 3:05. Here’s the rarely heard longer version.

Notice the name of the group is just plain Commodores, not THE Commodores. Not many acts use that practice for their moniker. Eagles come to mind, however. There was a follow-up single, also taken from the LP Hot On The Tracks, called “Fancy Dancer” (No. 39 Pop) on Motown. That Commodores LP had just spent six non-consecutive weeks as the Hot Soul LPs chart-leader; replaced this week by another Motown act, Stevie Wonder with Songs In The Key Of Life. (**See below.)


THE

BIG ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 16, 1976



TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘76:


No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week Not Charted)


SONGS IN THE KEY OF LIFE

Stevie Wonder

TAMLA RECORDS00340

Produced, arranged and composed by Stevie Wonder. That alone left little doubt that he was at the top of his craft by the time Songs In The Key Of Life was released in ’76; the first album to debut at No. 1 by an American artist. Englishman Elton John was the first. Wonder’s double-album plus EP began its lengthy ride at the pinnacle of the Top LPs & Tape chart for an eventual 13 survey-periods, as well as the Hot Soul LPs listing for 20 non-consecutive weeks. What’s known as the ‘Classic Stevie Wonder Period’ started in 1972 with the LP Music Of My Mind. That was followed later in ’72 by Talking Book, Innervisions from ’73, Fullfillingness’ First Finale in ’74—and, after a very prolonged waiting period— Songs In The Key Of Life in ’76. He almost quit the music business before Song In The Key Of Life was released, as he was unhappy the U.S. government; almost moving to Africa. He thought twice about it, and signed yet another deal with Motown/Tamla. As a result, and after many pushed-up release dates for the album, the first 45 RPM single from the two-LP and one 33 1/3 RPM EP set was “I Wish,” a paean to Stevie’s youth. 

The next single, “Sir Duke,” his tribute to his idols, especially the then recently departed Duke Ellington, also reached No. 1 on the Pop and Soul singles listings in 1977. Stevie Wonder had turned 21 in 1971 and let his current Motown contract expire. To return, he insisted on not only a higher royalty rate, but autonomy to record virtually anything he wished. Fearing losing Wonder to another company, Berry Gordy, Jr. acquiesced. The first result under the new deal, Music Of My Mind, was a bit scattered, but by Talking Book, Stevie was in full control and on a roll. Over 100 people were involved in Songs In The Key Of Life, including a myriad of musicians. The set included “Isn’t She Lovely” a song about his newborn child Aisha. “Pastime Paradise” is another standout track, largely about America’s Bi-Centennial year and those who exist in the past, with minuscule hope for the future—perhaps a reflection of how he felt about the U.S. government at the time. This ambitious album is thought by many musicologists to be among the greatest records released in the Rock & Roll era.

 

HOT SOUL LPS CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘76


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week Not Charted)


SONGS IN THE KEY OF LIFE

Stevie Wonder

MOTOWN RECORDS00340


(**See above.)

 


THE

BIG
 SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

October 18, 1986


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘86:


 

No. 5 (LW 7) “HEARTBEAT”

Don Johnson EPIC06285

No. 4 (LW 4) “THROWING IT ALL AWAY”

Genesis ATLANTIC89372

No. 3 (LW 9) “TRUE COLORS”

Cyndi Lauper PORTRAIT06247

No. 2 (LW 5) “TYPICAL MALE”

Tina Turner CAPITOL5615


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1) 

 

“WHEN I THINK OF YOU”

Janet Jackson

A&M RECORDS2855


Women—particularly Janet Jackson—headed the Top 3 songs roster this week in ’86, with two other females on her heals; Tina Turner and Cyndi Lauper. Cyndi’s hit would become the No. 1 record soon, and Tina had to settle for the No. 2 spot, but Janet sat at the thrown this week with “When I Think Of You” on A&M Records. This was the second and concluding seven-day analysis-period at the summit for Jackson. The 45 RPM release was spawned from her third album Control produced by Janet, along with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and Executive Producer John McLain. “When I Think Of You” was Janet’s first Hot 100 Singles chart boss; she’s had eight up to this publication date. With “When I Think Of You,” Janet permitted the distinction of her and her brother Michael being the first siblings to have solo No. 1 singles on the Hot 100.

Control had already been the prime album on the Top Pop Albums chart back in the first two weeks of July of ’86, on the strength of that Spring’s “What Have You Done For Me Lately” (No. 4 Pop) and “Nasty” (No. 3 Pop) peaking on the week-ending on July 19, 1986. So by the time “When I Think Of You” was No. 1, fans of Janet’s had already grabbed the album on vinyl, cassette or CD. The song reached No. 3 on the Hot Black Singles list, and was the top song on the Hot Dance Club Play chart as well. Paula Abdul choreographed the video for “What Have You Done For Me Lately.”

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’86:


No.1

 

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“THROWING IT ALL AWAY”

Genesis

ATLANTIC RECORDS 89372


This was the second U.S. single from the Genesis album called Invisible Touch; with “Throwing It All Away” on Atlantic Records at the helm of the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart this week in ’86. Anthony “Tony” Banks, Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford each got songwriting and arranging credit for the tune; plus the trio got producers credit along with Hugh Padgham. Interestingly, all three members of Genesis had their own separate companies (or LTD) after each of their names on the label.

The B side was a previously unreleased track called “Do The Neurotic” with the same credit labeling as the A side and not included on the Invisible Touch LP—which makes collecting 45 RPM platters so much fun. The single “Throwing It All Away” peaked at the No. 4 slot on the Hot 100. Other tracks from the LP charted as well, including the title track, and first single “Invisible Touch” (No. 1 Pop for one week during the summer) as well as “Land Of Confusion” (No. 4 Pop) “Tonight, Tonight, Tonight” (No. 3 Pop)) and “In Too Deep” (also No. 3 Pop) the last of five singles spawned from the LP. Phil Collins was balancing a solo and group career with Genesis at the time, and was one of the most in-demand artists of the entire decade.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’86:


No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“WORD UP”

Cameo

ATLANTA ARTIST RECORDS884983


Imagine, if you will, having Lieutenant Commander Geordi La Forge from the Starship Enterprise arresting you and your buddies. That’s JUST what happened…well…kinda for the video of “Word Up” by the band Cameo. LaVar Burton without the VISOR (vision device) did ‘arrest’ the group before he played the character on the then upcoming series. “Word Up” (No. 1 this week in ’86 on the Hot Black Singles chart) came from an album of the same name on Atlanta Artists Records. Here’s that video with LaVar Burton and his mighty megaphone. 

Originally, Cameo had roots in the New York City funk scene during the mid-‘70s. They quickly morphed into a Disco/Dance band just as that music was getting red hot. In fact, their original moniker was The New York City Players, but decided to change their name to not interfere with the name of the Ohio Players, the very hot funk outfit in the mid-‘70s from Dayton, Ohio. Larry Ernest Blackmon wrote the song “Word Up” along with fellow band member Thomas Michael Jenkins. Their follow-up was called “Candy” from the Word Up LP, and would also become a No. 1 record on the Hot Black Singles chart and No. 21 on the Hot 100 Pop list. “Candy” showed up in the successful 2004 video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, playing on the radio. Their first hit was “She’s Strange” in 1984 and was also a chart-leader on the Hot Black Singles chart that year but only reached No. 47 on the Pop singles list.

 

THE

BIG ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

October 18, 1986



TOP POP ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘86:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 2)


FORE!

Huey Lewis and the News

CHRYSALIS RECORDS41534

The fourth album for Huey Lewis and the News, Fore!, was in the only week it would occupy the peak position on the Top Pop Albums chart during this survey-period in ’86. But the Chrysalis Records release had five Top 10 singles on it, with “Stuck With You” sliding down from its lofty No. 1 spot for the first three 7-day evaluation phases during early autumn in 1986. The follow-up single just debuted on the Hot 100 this week called “Hip To Be Square” and would eventually attain the No. 3 spot on that listing. Football Hall of Famer’s from the San Francisco 49er’s Joe Montana and Ronnie Lott sang back-up vocals on the track. “Hip To Be Square” was also released briefly on the 2000 soundtrack of the film American Psycho, starring Christian Bale, Willem Defoe and Jared Leto, but was pulled at the insistence of Huey Lewis, due to the lack of clearance rights; not due to the violence in the film as was erroneously reported at the time. Only about 100,000 of copies contained the track before it was yanked off the CD shelves that year, making the original issue a mini-collector’s item.

The follow-up to “Hip To Be Square” was “Jacob’s Ladder” the group’s third and final No. 1 record on the Hot 100. That was followed by “I Know What I Like” which also featured the 49er’s players. That one reached No. 9 on the Pop list. Finally, “Doing It All For My Baby” was the fifth Top 10 song (No. 6 Pop to be precise) from Fore! Another song from the album called “Simple As That” was put out in Great Britain-only as a single. In addition to the News—Mario Cipollina on bass, Bill Gibson on drums, Chris Hayes on guitar, Johnny Colla on guitar and sax and Sean Hopper on keyboards—the incredible Tower Of Power horn section was also featured on the album.


HOT BLACK ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘86


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

 

RAPTURE

Anita Baker

ELEKTRA RECORDS60444-1

 

All told, there were five singles released from this week’s No. 1 LP on the Hot Black Albums chart from Anita Baker called Rapture on Elektra Records. The first single was the big one called “Sweet Love,” which had peaked at No. 8 on the Hot 100 Singles register, No. 2 on the Hot Black Singles chart, and No. 3 on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles listing. “Sweet Love” won a Grammy® for Best Rhythm & Blues Song; and the album Rapture won an additional Grammy® for Best R&B Performance, Female both for the year 1986 at the 29th Grammy Awards® held in the Shrine Auditorium in L.A. Here’s “Sweet Love” from Anita Baker.

The other four singles from Anita Baker’s Rapture were: “Caught Up In The Rapture” (No. 37 Pop—No. 6 R&B—No. 9 Adult Contemporary) followed by “Watch Your Step” (No. 23 R&B only) “Same Ole Love (365 Days A Year)” (No. 44 Pop—No. 6 Adult Contemporary—(No. 8 R&B) and finally “No One In The World” (No. 44 Pop—No. 5 R&B—No. 9 Adult Contemporary) to round out the singles from Rapture. This album sold over five million copies in the U.S. alone and is considered among the best LP sets for the decade. Baker went on to have multiple Grammy Awards® bestowed upon her and several Soul Train Awards as well. Anita Baker was honored on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1994. 

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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