Tuesday, February 21, 2017 Page Options

BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

   Minimize




November 7th, 2014



THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 11, 1967



HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’67:

No. 5 (LW 5) “YOUR PRECIOUS LOVE”

Marvin Gaye & Tammi TerrellTAMLA54156

No. 4 (LW 7) “INSENSE AND PEPPERMINTS”

Strawberry Alarm Clock UNI55018

No. 3 (LW 3) “IT MUST BE HIM”  

Vicki Carr LIBERTY55986

No. 2 (LW 2) “SOUL MAN” 

Sam & Dave STAX231

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“TO SIR WITH LOVE”

Lulu

EPIC RECORDS10187

This was the fourth of an ultimate five weeks at the pinnacle of the Pop list—The Hot 100 Singles chart—for Lulu with “To Sir With Love” on the Epic Records label. The song was the biggest charting 45 RPM for 1967 in America. Lulu’s birth name is quite long; Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie. So where did she get the name Lulu? The Scottish singer began performing in Scotland at a young age, becoming a member of a local rock & roll band at the age of 13. Two years later, she signed with Decca Records and renamed as Lulu & the Luvers (at the suggestion of her long-time manager Marion Massey) and almost immediately had a British hit cover-version of the Isley Brothers’ smash, ‘Shout.” The single barely made a blip on the radar in the colonies. Flash-forward to 1967; and the song that brought her global fame was the title song from the film To Sir With Love, starring Sidney Portier. Lulu originally snagged a bit part in the film, but highly impressed the film’s director James Clavell in the film’s early takes. He then re-worked the script and put her into a more prominent role in the movie; giving her the chance to sing the closing segment song, “To Sir With Love”—written by Mark London with lyrics by Don Black.

The film version has an extra verse that was edited for the single release of “To Sir With Love.” And interestingly, the smash U.S. hit song was the B side to a record called “Let’s Pretend” in the U.K. and was not a big record over there. Lulu married Maurice Gibb of the Bee Gees in early 1969 (they divorced in ’74) just before she won the Eurovision contest with a song called “Boom Bang-A-Bang”—a No. 2 hit in the U.K.; but one that never even hit the Hot 100 here. Her American recording career never was able to repeat her initial success, but in the opinion of Big Jay, her 1969 song “Oh Me Oh My (I’m A Fool For You Baby)” recorded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama is her crowning moment musically. That song reached only No. 22 on the Hot 100, but was hand-crafted to perfection by the Atlantic/Atco Records production team of arranger Arif Mardin with producers Jerry Wexler and Tom Dowd. It came from an album called New Routes which featured the guitar playing of one Duane Allman. Please listen to this blue-eyed Soul song here!

Lulu had another one more Top 20 U.S. hit in her in 1981 called “I Could Never Miss You (More Than I Do) which wasn’t a bad record either.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“MORE THAN THE EYE CAN SEE”

Al Martino

CAPITOL RECORDS – 5989


Al Martino’s dad’s name was Garparino Cini. His kid’s name was anglicized to Jasper Cini when he was born in South Philadelphia. Growing up, he befriended a kid named Alfredo Cocozza, who became a singing star when he changed his moniker to Mario Lanza. So Jasper Cini, with Lanza’s support, changed his name to Al Martino. Jasper…uh…Al,  recorded some songs in New York with no success, but appeared on the Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts TV program and was in effect, discovered. The prize was a recording deal with a label called BBS and released “Here In My Heart” in 1952. His ‘pal’ Lanza’s label RCA Victor wanted Mario to release it, but his friendship with Martino allowed him to have a million-selling hit. The song was a massive success in the U.K. where it was one of the biggest selling singles of all time there. That song led to Martino getting a deal with Capitol Records, where he spent over 25 years. Other hits included “I Love You Because” (No. 3 Pop) “I Love You More And More Every Day” (No. 9 Pop) and what became his signature song “Spanish Eyes” in late 1965. While that song just reached No. 15 in early ’66 on the Hot 100, the song lives on as a standard. This week in ’67, Al Martino held down the No. 1 spot on the Easy Listening Singles chart with “More Than The Eye Can See” co-written by the recently departed Bob Crewe along with noted songwriter Larry Weiss (known for “Rhinestone Cowboy”).  

Al Martino’s career was by no means done, as he had a surprise hit released in ’74 called “To The Door Of The Sun (Alle Porte Del Sole)” hitting the peak position of No. 17 on the Pop chart. He’s perhaps most famous for his role as Johnny Fontane in the flick The Godfather in 1972, starring Marlon Brando and sang the Love Theme from the movie called “Speak Softly Love.” He also appeared in The Godfather III in 1990 with Al Pacino. Al Martino died in 2009 at the age of 82.

 

TOP SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES

SINGLES CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘67


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“SOUL MAN”

Sam & Dave

STAX RECORDS – 231


While “Soul Man” was hitting its peak position on the Hot 100 at No. 2, at the same time it was the prime 45 RPM on the Top Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles chart this week in ’67. The Stax Records machine was well-oiled when this record hit the charts, featuring the backing band Booker T. & the M.G’s featuring Duck Dunn on bass, Al “The Human Metronome” Jackson and guitarist Steve Cropper—“play it Steve.” “Soul Man” was conceived by Isaac Hayes along with his then songwriting partner David Porter. Hayes had watched a TV account of the race riots in Detroit in 1967, with the word “soul” painted on buildings owned by Blacks; thus sparing them from destruction. That word stuck with him as a metaphor for pride, and that turned into the song featuring Sam Moore and Dave Prater.


Let it be known that Sam & Dave didn’t get along very well. They used to enter the stage from opposite sides, due to that uncomfortable relationship. They also never harmonized, as Prater wasn’t very good at it. At the time of his death in 1988 (due to a car accident in Georgia) Prater had been a resident of the Passaic County, NJ city of Patterson. Sam Moore (born Samuel Hicks) is still performing. The act Sam & Dave (the original Sam and not another “Sam” that Prater legally used for touring toward the end of his life) were inducted into the class of ’92 for the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. They’re also in the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. “Soul Man” won a Grammy® for Best Rhythm & Blues Group Performance in ‘67. The song “Soul Man” was put into the Grammy® Hall of Fame in 1999 and was certainly helped by the performance of the Blues Brothers and their remake.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 11, 1967


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


DIANA ROSS AND THE SUPREMES GREATEST HITS

(Vol. 1 & 2)*

The Supremes

MOTOWN RECORDS2-663 

Why this compilation became known as Volumes 1 & 2 is two-fold. First, it was a double album (rare for Motown at the time) and there would be a Volume 3 (one disc) released in 1969 to coinside with Diana Ross leaving the Supremes. But at the time of the collections’ release (August 29, 1967) the official title was Diana Ross & The Supremes Greatest Hits. Motown was never really great with album cover artwork, but this one was a bit classier than others with a deep blue cover and a painting of the three women with copies of paintings included inside the original release by Robert Taylor of Diana, Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard. Interestingly, Ballard had already been booted from the Supremes by the time this album was in record stores. This week was the third of five consecutive seven-day survey-periods as America’s biggest album on the Top LPs chart. For a change I’d like to feature a song that was the B side of “Love Is Here And Now You’re Gone” called “There’s No Stopping Us Now” from January, 1967; of course, written and produced by Holland-Dozier-Holland. This is one of my fave Supremes songs and was included on this set.

That song was featured originally on the LP The Supremes Sing Holland-Dozier-Holland.  Motown’s latest Supremes single had just entered the Hot 100 Singles chart this week in ’67 called “In And Out Of Love.” That song peaked at No. 9 in late ’67. The previous single (the first under the moniker Diana Ross & The Supremes) was “Reflections.” Those two songs were NOT included on this double album; ending up on The Supremes Greatest Hits Vol. 3 set two years later. So the most up to date song on this double album was the NON-album single “The Happening” from a horrible movie of the same name. “The Happening” was a No. 1 song for the week ending on May 13, 1967. Up to that time, that was the first Supremes single to feature a fourth writer in the credits; Frank DeVol who had scored the music for the film The Happening starring Anthony Quinn. This double album set, Diana Ross & The Supremes Greatest Hits, went on to sell a reported five million copies worldwide.


TOP SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES

 LPs CHART


THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


DIANA ROSS AND THE SUPREMES GREATEST HITS

(Vol. 1 & 2)*

The Supremes

MOTOWN RECORDS – 2-663


In addition to being the biggest album on the Top LPs chart, Diana Ross & The Supremes Greatest Hits (Vol. 1 & 2)* was sitting in the catbird seat on the Top Selling Rhythm & Blues LPs chart for the fifth of an ultimate 12 weeks; all the way to the end of 1967. As another bonus track from this compilation, here’s the B side of the No. 5 Pop hit “My World Is Empty Without You” called “Everything Is Good About You,” written by a guy named James Dean along with Eddie Holland, Jr. Enjoy this extended version.

For more information about this double album set, see Top LPs above.

 


THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 15, 1975


HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:


No. 5 (LW 6) “HEATWAVE” / LOVE IS A ROSE”

Linda Ronstadt ASYLUM45282

No. 4 (LW 5) “MIRACLES”

Jefferson Starship GRUNT10367

No. 3 (LW 4) “WHO LOVES YOU

Four Seasons WARNER BROTHERS / CURB RECORDS8122

No. 2 (LW 2)“LYIN’ EYES”

Eagles ASYLUM45279


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“ISLAND GIRL”

Elton John

MCA RECORDS40461


This was the third and final week as the prime 45 RPM on the Hot 100 Singles chart during this seven-day survey-phase in ’75 for Elton John’s “Island Girl” on MCA Records. Initially, it sold over one-million copies; but later it was designated a two-million-selling single in 1995. “Island Girl” was Elton’s third No. 1 Billboard hit in ’75, and the first from the album Rock Of The Westies, which had debuted in the No. 1 spot; only the second album to do so on Billboard’s Top LPs & Tape listing. Cashbox called “Island Girl” the 10th biggest hit of the year.

Lyrically, Bernie Taupin’s “Island Girl” deals with a touchy subject involving a six-foot-three prostitute (was it a guy in reality as some have speculated) and a ‘John’ wanting to take her back to her native Jamaica. Not Jamaica, Queens, but the island of Jamaica. Elton John’s band, using a Carribean flair, consisted of Kiki Dee singing back-up vocals on this track, Davey Johnstone on electric guitar, Caleb Quaye on acoustic guitar, Ray Cooper on percussion and marimba, James Newton Howard on ARP synthesizer and Mellotron, Kenny Passarelli on bass, and Roger Pope on drums. Longtime John producer Gus Dudgeon produced the track, which Elton didn’t want to be released as a single. He wanted the song “Dare Dare (Pilot Of The Future)” as the first single, thinking it was more commercial. Here’s that song in case you haven’t heard it.

Dudgeon and Elton’s British record label DJM demanded “Island Girl” instead as the lead single from Rock Of The Westies. Elton John knocked-off Neil Sedaka’s “Bad Blood” from the top slot two weeks prior in ’75. Elton had an unaccredited back-up vocal on that song, released on John’s new record label The Rocket Record Company.

 

 EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘74

 

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“THE WAY I WANT TO TOUCH YOU”

Captain & Tennille

A&M RECORDS1725

On the liner notes of this single’s picture sleeve, Daryl Dragon (originally nicknamed Captain Keyboard by Mike Love when he was the musical arranger for the Beach Boys in the early ‘70s) says this song came about in 1973 with his romantic partner Toni Tennille at a small recording studio in San Fernando, California. It was initially released on two small record labels and flopped. It was picked up by A&M Records and released before their breakthrough hit “Love Will Keep Us Together.” “The Way I Want To Touch You” also flopped during A&M’s first try. However after Neil Sedaka and Howie Greenfield’s tune “Love Will Keep Us Together” became the biggest hit of the year, A&M re-released it and it reached No. 4 on the Hot 100 and was at the pinnacle of the Easy Listening Singles listing this week in ’75.

A guy named Morgan Cavett was listed as Producer of the track, with Toni Tennille said to be the Associate producer. Earlier THIS year, it was announced that the couple was divorcing due to ‘health-insurance reason’ after a 39 year marriage. On their website, there was a quote stating, “Almost all people naturally evolve over time, and sometimes hidden feelings start to be uncovered.” Ok then. Daryl Dragon is reported to have Parkinson’s disease. We wish him the best.  



HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘74

No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“FLY ROBIN FLY”

Silver Convention

MIDLAND INTERNATIONAL RECORDS10339


This first ‘Euro-Disco’ song to be a hit in America was originally going to be called “Run, Rabbit, Run” by one of its writers Silvester Levay. But just prior to recording the track that he had written with Stephan Prager (both Munich, Germany musicians) Levay heard an old 1940s song on the radio with that name. His producer Michael Kunze then proceeded to say, “Then it’s “Fly, Robin, Fly instead,” and the rest is history. Kunze was the one thinking the track would be a hit. Levay’s notion was that it would only be an album cut. Prior to making this LP, the musicians had a European hit called “Save Me,” sung with anonymous session singers. Your Big Jay the Jock played “Save Me” in the clubs in New Jersey at that time to great response. With the success of that track, they cut the LP also called Save Me and were surprised to find that song was a smash in the new ‘Disco’ clubs in the U.S. They were even more surprised when the song “Fly, Robin, Fly” was No. 1 in the states. It topped the Disco Action chart, based on its strength on New York Metropolitan Area club play. Later, it became the No. 1 Hot Soul Singles chart-leader for this sole week in ’75 and THEN blasted to the top of the Hot 100 Singles list two weeks later; staying there for three back-to-back seven-day survey-cycles.

They got their name when the session’s drummer Keith Forsey (a future major producer) suggested they use Levay’s nickname “Silver” as part of the moniker. So the name became Silver Convention. It should be noted that the song has just six English-spoken words, “Fly, robin, fly. Up-Up to the sky” (count them) as the rest is instrumental. The record won a Grammy® for Best R&B Instrumental Performance. This 45 RPM was the first for a German group to reach No. 1 in America in the Rock era. And NO, Bert Kaempfert was not a group, so “Wonderland By Night” doesn’t count. Silver Convention’s follow-up single and album had to use a new set of female singers, as the deal for the anonymous back-up women lapsed after that first LP. The NEW singers included Penny McLean who had a solo song (a dance-club hit in the U.S.) called “Lady Bump.” McLean, along with Linda G. Robinson and Ramona Wolf actually sang on “Get Up And Boogie,” a No. 2 Hot 100 hit just before the Bi-Centennial celebration in the U.S. in ’76.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 15, 1975


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

No. 1

Pop LP

(Last Week No. 1)


ROCK OF THE WESTIES

Elton John

MCA RECORDS2163


Rock Of The Westies was the second album by Elton John to debut at the No. 1 spot on the Top LPs & Tape chart, and was sitting there for the second of three consecutive weeks during this survey-period in ’75. The only single from the LP was “Island Girl,” No. 1 this week on the Hot 100. The album was recorded at the Caribou Ranch recording studios belonging to James William Guercio in Nederland, Colorado. Rock Of The Westies was just the second LP to debut at No. 1 on the Top LPs & Tape chart. Elton John’s Captain Fantastic And The Brown Dirt Cowboy was the first. Here’s the A side of the second single from the album, “Grow Some Funk Of Your Own.”

That single charted simultaneously with the B side called “I Feel Like A Bullet (In The Gun Of Robert Ford.)” Both sides reached No. 14 on the Hot 100.

Outlaw Robert Ford was the man who shot gang-leader Jessie James in 1892 and was himself shot to death by a guy named Edward O’Kelly. So he killed the guy who killed Jesse James. Thank your Big Jay for doing the digging to find out that tidbit.

 

HOT SOUL LPS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘75

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)


KC & THE SUNSHINE BAND

KC & The Sunshine Band

TK RECORDS603 

This was the second LP for the South Florida-based band on Henry Stone’s TK Records, which was named after an engineer named Terry Kane who built the Hialeah studio where this new sound emanated. The album was the leader on the Top Soul LPs chart this week in ’75 for just this survey-period. The eponymous KC & The Sunshine Band LP would have two No. 1 Hot 100 hits and even a future hit. This week, the second smash from the LP was rapidly climbing the charts called “That’s The Way (I Like It.)”

“That’s The Way (I Like It)” would be No. 1 on the Hot 100 for two weeks, beginning with the week ending November 22, 1975 and would be No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles listing for the seven-day survey-period ending on November 29th. The first single, “Get Down Tonight” was No. 1 nationwide on the Hot 100 for one week, for the survey-phase ending on August 30th. The song “Boogie Shoes” which was held back to become a later B side of the single “(Shake Shake Shake) Shake Your Booty” in ’76, was re-released as its own A side after it was included on the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. It reached No. 35 on its own with another track from the KC & The Sunshine Band album “I Get Lifted” as the “Boogie Shoes” B side. The co-writer (with Harry Wayne Casey) of most of the KC & the Sunshine Band’s hits, Richard Finch, is currently serving a seven-year prison sentence at a medium-security state prison in Ohio for inappropriate sexual contact with several male minors.    

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

November 12, 1983


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:

 

No. 5 (LW 3) “TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE HEART”

Bonnie Tyler COLUMBIA03906

No. 4 (LW 6) “SAY SAY SAY”

Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson WARNER BROS.04168

No. 3 (LW 5) “UPTOWN GIRL”

Billy Joel COLUMBIA04149

No. 2 (LW 1) “ISLANDS IN THE STREAM”

Kenny Rogers -- Duet with Dolly Parton RCA13615

 


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“ALL NIGHT LONG (ALL NIGHT)”

Lionel Richie

MOTOWN RECORDS1698

  

This was the first of four giant weeks for Lionel Richie with “All Night Long (All Night)” at the apex of the Hot 100 Singles chart on Motown Records this week in ‘83. The song sprang from the album Can’t Slow Down. The single and the accompanying video began the enslaught of Lionel-mania that pushed Can’t Slow Down into an elite crowd of sales and airplay. Richie contacted director Bob Rafelson (Five Easy Pieces and The Postman Always Rings Twice) and wanted him to direct a video for the first single. Lionel had seen Rafelson’s (and Jack Nicholson’s) film Head featuring the Monkees and asked him for assistance. Rafelson rounded up some local street break-dancers from L.A. for the shoot and created a dancing frenzy. Rafelson and his partner Bert Schneider created the Monkees TV show in 1966. Monkees member Mike Nesmith was listed as the video’s producer.

“All Night Long (All Night)” featured some nonsense. Yeah, a bunch of gobbledygook on toast. If you thought the line, “Tambo liteh sette mo-jah Yo Jambo jambo” meant anything, you’d be mostly incorrect. Jambo means “Hello” in Swahili, but the rest of it was totally made up. Richie also used words like, “Fiesta” or party in English and, “Liming” which loosely means “getting together” in some island nations of the Carribean. Lionel once claimed, much like Bob Marley’s rants, they were just expressions that sounded foreign and fun.

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’83:

No.1


Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“ALL NIGHT LONG (ALL NIGHT”

Lionel Richie

MOTOWN RECORDS 1698

 

This was also the first of four back-to-back weeks as the  Adult Contemporary Singles chart-leader in the U.S.A. for Lionel Richie’s smash, “All Night Long (All Night)” on Motown Records. (**See above.)

 

BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’83:


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“ALL NIGHT LONG (ALL NIGHT)”

Lionel Richie

MOTOWN RECORDS1698


The Black Singles chart was even kinder to Lionel Richie with this across the board smash hit. This chart was the first to make it a No. 1 song; currently in the fourth of an eventual seven weeks in the top position. (**See above.)

 

  

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

November 12, 1983


TOP POP ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

SYNCHRONICITY

The Police


After being apart for the better of one year, the Police re-grouped and recorded what would be their swan song and their biggest album while they were arguably, the biggest rock band in the world. On A&M Records, Synchronicity sold upwards of eight million copies in the U.S. alone and spawned several singles. Just entering the Hot 100 Singles chart last week in ’83 was the third single from the album called “Synchronicity II.”


This was the 16th of an ultimate 17 non-consecutive weeks for the set. The only album that got in the way of Synchronicity for just one week was Thriller from Michael Jackson. But that album had a life of its own. Like Cream from the ‘60s, this ‘80s trio packed a lot of sound into those three instruments and voices. Obviously, “Every Breath You Take” was the exalted track from the album. The single was No. 1 for eight non-stop survey-phases during the almost the entire month of July into the last week of August of ’83 on the Hot 100 and was the biggest hit of the year; plus it was the fifth biggest of the entire ‘80s. It reached No. 5 on the Adult Contemporary Singles list during its run. The second single in America was “King Of Pain” which did a respectable No. 3 on the Hot 100, released in August of ’83. The third single was “Synchronicity II” (**see above) and that got to No. 16. Finally, “Wrapped Around Your Finger” reached No. 8 during the early part of ’84. The album is in the Grammy® Hall of Fame, and won a Grammy® for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group. In addition, “Every Breath You Take” won for Song of the Year for the writer Sting and it was awarded Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group. Andy Summers played guitar and piano on the LP and the amazing Stewart Copeland banged on the skins along with Sting’s bass. 




BLACK ALBUMS

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘83

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


COLD BLOODED

Rick James

GORDY (Motown) RECORDS6043

In the ninth of 10 consecutive weeks at No. 1 on the Black Albums chart, Rick James scored with Cold Blooded on Gordy Records. Between him and Lionel Richie, they kept the Motown family of labels alive for another few years. Cold Blooded featured the No. 1 Black Singles chart hit (six weeks at the end of summer beginning of fall) also called “Cold Blooded” which only reached No. 40 on the Pop Hot 100 in ’83. Another single featured one of the legends of R&B (and music in general) Smokey Robinson. The song “Ebony Eyes” was a kind of departure for Rick James, as he used Robinson as a counter-weight to his usual punk/funk style.

The video shot for this track on Cold Blooded was a throw-back itself, using an old aircraft named “Ebony Eyes” that crashed with James and Robinson stuck on a deserted island only to be rescued by their women. The dream-like quality of the story melded quite nicely with the two-guys doing their parts. And where else than a ‘80s video could you crash-land on an island and two white suits wash-up on shore in a big box. Right? I was expecting a couple of women inside the first time I saw this one. But the women showed up on a sailboat. The single “Ebony Eyes” debuted on the Hot 100 in December of ’83, with the first pressings saying it was Rick James and ‘Friend.’ 

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
);