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June 27th, 2014






THE BIG SINGLES   

 

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 4, 1964

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK:

 

No. 5 (LW 5)“PEOPLE”

Barbra Streisand – Columbia – 42965

No. 4 (LW 7)“DON’T LET THE SUN CATCH YOU CRYING”

Gerry And The Pacemakers – Laurie – 3251

No. 3 (LW 6)“MEMPHIS”

Johnnie Rivers – Imperial – 66032

No. 2 (LW 4)“MY BOY LOLLIPOP”

Millie Small (The Blue Beat Girl) – Smash – 1893


No. 1

(Last Week No. 2):

“I GET AROUND”

The Beach Boys

Capitol Records – 5174

The Beach Boys reached the top of the Hot 100 Singles chart for the very first time this week in ’64, the first of two consecutive seven-day survey-periods. This recording was fraught with ill feeling as Brian Wilson’s dad Murry disagreed with how the production was going. Brian shoved his father and propelled him out of the studio. He was sorry, but Murry never stepped foot in the studio with his sons, nephew and friend again. Perhaps that’s what led to “I Get Around” to be the ‘perfect’ record Brian envisioned.


Brian wrote the song with his cousin Mike Love based on something many California kids were doing at the time; cruzin’ on the strip in a hot-rod. The rest of America must have envisioned doing the same thing. This song was released on the sixth Beach Boys LP called All Summer Long. That album also contained “Wendy” plus their version of “Little Honda” written by Wilson and Love and covered by a studio group called the Hondells. That rendition became the hit in the U.S.A. reaching No. 9 and featured Glen Campbell on guitar and Hal Blaine on drums, who both performed on dozens of Beach Boys recording sessions. In addition, the Beach Boys version of “Little Honda” was released on an EP (Extended Play) 45 RPM disc, and reached No. 65 on the Hot 100.

 

POP STANDARDS SINGLES

CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1):

“PEOPLE”

Barbra Streisand

Columbia Records – 42956

“People” was the very first charting single from Barbra Streisand on Columbia Records. It was recorded in New York at the Columbia Studios on December 20, 1963 in Studio A. It was the first take that was used as the master, warts and all, as apparently, a wrong note was played by a French horn player, much to the chagrin of the conductor Peter Matz. The song was taken from the Broadway play based on Fanny Brice, Funny Girl, composed by Jule Styne with lyrics from Bob Merrill. This track was included on the album Funny Girl: The Original Broadway Cast Recording, and on Streisand’s LP called People, her fourth LP. This was the second of three back-to-back weeks for “People” in the No. 1 position on the Pop Standards Singles chart.



The album’s arranger and conductor Peter Matz went on to do the orchestration for the Carol Burnette Show on CBS-TV and was musical director of the Jimmy Dean Show and Hullabaloo. The album was produced by Robert Mersey. It also mentions she was accompanied by Peter Daniels on piano. When “People” was recorded, the play had not yet opened on Broadway. Funny Girl opened on March 26, 1964.

 

CASHBOX R&B SINGLES CHART:

(**There was no Billboard R&B Singles chart at this time.)

 

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“WALK ON BY”

Dionne Warwick

 Scepter Records – 1262

This week’s biggest R&B single from Cashbox Magazine was in the third of four consecutive weeks at the pinnacle of that survey from Dionne Warwick’s second Top 10 45 RPM release on the Billboard Hot 100, “Walk On By.” The song was composed by Burt Bacharach with lyrics by Hal David. It was recorded along with “Anyone Who Had A Heart” in late ’63 at the Bell Sound Studios in New York City.  



“Walk On By” would reach No. 6 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. Rolling Stone Magazine lists the recording at No. 70 on their directory of Top 500 Songs of All Time. The drummer on the soft track was a guy named Gary Chester, who played on thousands of diverse recordings including: “Save The Last Dance For Me” by the Drifters, “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” from the Shirelles, “My Boyfriend’s Back” by the Angels, “Brown Eyed Girl” from Van Morrison, “Sugar Sugar” by the Archies and “You Don’t Mess Around With Jim” with Jim Croce.

 

THE BIG ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 4, 1964

TOP LPS CHART:

No. 1 

(Last Week No. 1)

Hello, Dolly!

Louis Armstrong

 Kapp Records – 3364

Louis Armstrong once again had the chief album on the Top LPs chart with Hello, Dolly! This was the fourth of a definitive six weeks as the list’s leader. The original soundtrack to the play had been No. 1 for one week before Satchmo’s version took over. The song “Hello, Dolly!” was the opening track from the Jazz legend’s LP.



Armstrong’s other commonly used nickname was “Pops” as he regularly forgot the names of people he met, and call them Pops. As you see on the video above, Armstrong ad-libbed the words and with his form of “Scat” singing. He wasn’t the first artist do so, but he made it popular once he began singing on early recordings along with his cornet and trumpet prowess.

 

(**There were NO separate R&B LP charts on either Billboard or Cashbox Magazines during this time in 1964.)





This Week in 1975

THE BIG SINGLES 

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 5, 1975

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES THIS WEEK:

No. 5 (LW 5)“LOVE WON’T LET ME WAIT”

Major Harris – Atlantic -- 3248

No. 4 (LW 3) “WILDFIRE”

Michael Murphy – Epic – 50084

No. 3 (LW 7) “LISTEN TO WHAT THE MAN SAID”

Paul McCartney and Wings – Capitol -- 4091

No. 2 (LW 6)“THE HUSTLE”

Van McCoy and the Soul City Symphony – Avco – 4653

   

      No. 1

(Last Week No. 1):

“LOVE WILL KEEP US TOGETHER”

Captain & Tennille

A&M Records – 1672

This week in ’74, the leader of the Hot 100 singles chart was in its third of four eventual uninterrupted weeks at the apex of the listing. “Love Will Keep Us Together” by Captain & Tennille was a remake version of Neil Sedaka’s original recording on a 1973 album.



There had been an earlier version of “Love Will Keep Us Together,” released in the U.K. but it didn’t chart there the by brother and sister act Mac & Katie Kissoon. That rendition did become a decent sized hit, but only in the Netherlands. That duo was semi-famous in the U.S. for a bubblegum-like ditty called “Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep” on ABC Records. Sedaka’s original “Love Will Keep Us Together” was featured on his 1973 British-only LP The Tra-La Days Are Over and then in ’74 on his U.S. compilation album Sedaka’s Back; thus the reference to that LP at the end of the interpretation by Captain & Tennille. Their rendition would end up as the biggest 45 RPM release of 1975 and won a Grammy® for Record of the Year.  

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

CHART:

 

No. 1

“EVERYTIME YOU TOUCH ME (I GET HIGH)”

Charlie Rich

Epic Records – 50103

Here’s an artist that had been toying with the charts as far back as 1960. After working as a session instrumentalist and writer at Sun Records in Memphis, Charlie Rich, later known as “The Silver Fox” had his first hit on the Sun affiliate label Phillips Records (as in owner Sam Phillips—No. 22 on the Hot 100) called “Lonely Weekends.” He had to wait until 1965 to have his next hit on Smash Records (No. 21 Pop) with “Mohair Sam.” He signed to Epic Records by 1970 and still didn’t quite have the upper chart reach he’d have just a few of years later. With “Behind Closed Doors” (No. 15 Pop) in 73, he opened the door for a crossover Country into Pop career that lasted several years. He struck gold next with the Grammy® winning song, “The Most Beautiful Girl” (No. 1 Pop) yet he slid downward on the next few releases.



This week’s No. 1 Easy Listening Chart hit in ’75 would be the next to last for Charlie Rich on the Hot 100 (No. 19) but was strong enough to hit the heights on the Easy Listening list with “Everytime You Touch Me (I Get High).” Rich co-wrote the tune with producer/writer Billy Sherrill, known as the originator of the “Countrypolitan Sound” in Nashville. This song was at the chart’s peak for just one week. This track managed to reach No. 3 on the Country chart as well. Rich died in 1995 at the age of 62.  

HOT SOUL SINGLES

CHART:

No. 1

“SLIPPERY WHEN WET”

 

The Commodores

Motown Records – 1338

This week’s top song on the Hot Soul Singles chart was the Commodores first No. 1 record on any chart. “Slippery When Wet” was able to attain the No. 19 spot on the Hot 100 Pop chart, their biggest hit up to that point. Originating at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama in the late ‘60s, after being signed by Motown in ’71, they opened for the Jackson 5 and by 1974 began a torrid couple of years as the opening act for Stevie Wonder, and even the Rolling Stones as they honed their skills.  



Recorded in Los Angeles, this funky piece of music was written by Thomas McClary, the group’s guitarist, and vocalist Walter “Sweet Clyde” Orange. This single was taken from the ’75 Commodores LP Caught In The Act on Motown Records. If you listen to the song (above) it sounds like the 1976 hit “Play That Funky Music” by the band Wild Cherry. When you simply change a few things around, there is a striking similarity in melody and funkiness. A shameless rip-off if you ask me. And THAT song got to No. 1 on the Hot 100. Wild Cherry all but disappeared after their claim to fame. However, the Commodores where poised for mainstream success themselves with their next bunch of singles including: “Sweet Love” and “Just To Be Close To You.” Little did anyone know, the Commodores’ biggest hits were to follow, some crossing over to several charts. They would become Motown’s biggest act of the entire ‘70s. Group co-founder Lionel Richie would later become a solo superstar.

THE BIG ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 5, 1975

TOP LPS & TAPE

CHART:

No. 1 

(Last Week No. 1)

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC AND THE BROWN DIRT COWBOY

Elton John

MCA Records – 1613

This was the very first album to every debut in the No. 1 spot on the Top LPs & Tape Chart in history. Elton John pulled off that feat with his ninth studio album called Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy on MCA Records. This LP was a concept album from the start, with Elton being Captain Fantastic, and his lyricist partner Bernie Taupin portrayed as the Brown Dirt Cowboy. All of the music was composed by Elton while cruising on a ship from England to the U.S.A. He claims it was his best album, as it wasn’t as commercial as many of his other works. He explains more in this video.




“Someone Saved My Life Tonight” was the only single selected from the album and reached No. 4 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. It was auto-biographical, telling the story of his engagement to a woman and his attempted suicide in 1969. The single sold over one million copies. English Pop Artist Alan Aldridge designed the ornate cover of the LP, in its fifth week of an ultimate seven non-consecutive survey-periods at No. 1.  

 

HOT SOUL LPS & TAPES

CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

THAT’S THE WAY OF THE WORLD

Earth, Wind & Fire

Columbia Records – 33280

This was the fifth and last non-consecutive week for Earth, Wind & Fire’s album That’s The Way Of The World to hit the apex of the Hot Soul LPs & Tapes chart in ’75. The first single from the album was “Shining Star” which had been the No. 1 Hot 100 hit ending the week of May 24, 1975. The album’s studio title track (seen in a live setting below) wasn’t released until June 18th, but impacted the album’s sales as it returned to the peak position that week.



“That’s The Way Of The World” was from the pens of Charles Stepney (who died about a year later) a renowned Chicago-based arranger/songwriter, along with Maurice White (leader of the group) and his younger brother Verdine White, the group’s bass guitar player. The single reached No. 12 on the Hot 100, and No. 5 on the Hot Soul Singles chart. Two other tracks from the album, “Africano” and “Happy Feelin’” made the top spot on the then new Disco chart. Another track, “Reasons,” got significant radio play.



This Week in 1983

THE BIG SINGLES 

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 2, 1983

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK:

No. 5 (LW 8)“NEVER GONNA LET YOU GO”

Sergio Mendez (Vocals: Joe Pizzulo & Leza Miller) – A&M – 2540

No. 4 (LW 2)“TIME (CLOCK OF THE HEART)”

Culture Club – Epic/Virgin – 03796

No. 3 (LW 4) “EVERY BREATH YOU TAKE”

Police – A&M – 2542

No. 2 (LW 3) “ELECTRIC AVENUE”

Eddy Grant – Portrait – 03793





NO. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“FLASHDANCE…WHAT A FEELING”

Irene Cara

Casablanca – 811 440

The third biggest hit 45 RPM release of 1983 was also the winner of the Oscar® for Best Original Song from a motion picture and won a Golden Globe® for Best Original Song. “Flashdance…What A Feeling” came from the film starring Jennifer Beals and Michael Nouri. The song was in the last of six consecutive weeks at the crest of the Hot 100 Singles listing. An entertainer since the age of three, Irene Cara co-wrote the lyrics to “Flashdance…What A Feeling” with Keith Forsey, and had noted Euro-disco music composer Giorgio Moroder in the credits. The word flashdance is never uttered in the song! Flashdance: Original Soundtrack from the Motion Picture sold in excess of six million copies, and was a Grammy® winner for Best Album of Original Score Written For a Motion Picture or TV Special.



Yet another No. 1 song would leap to the pinnacle position of the Pop chart later in the summer of ’83 from the film and soundtrack, with Michael Sembello’s track “Maniac.” This week’s No. 1 Hot 100 Singles chart-leader from Irene Cara also showed up on Irene Cara’s own LP called What A Feelin’ on Geffen Records; but her LP only reached No. 77 on the Top LPs chart due to the title track’s exposure on the soundtrack recording. Her album did yield another couple of hits from Cara. The same three writing partners scored again with “Why Me” reaching No. 13 on the Hot 100 in the autumn of ’83 and a third time with the tune “Breakdance” attaining the No. 8 spot in the spring of ‘84.

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

SINGLES

CHART

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“NEVER GONNA LET YOU GO”

Sergio Mendez

(Vocals: Joe Pizzulo & Leza Miller)

A&M Records – 2540

Brazilian Bossa Nova impresario Sergio Mendez was not a singer. But as the leader of several incarnations of his Brazil ’66 ensemble he had many hits on Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss’ label A&M Records. His biggest singles before the ‘80s all happened in the late ‘60s including: “Mas Que Nada,” “The Look Of Love,” “The Fool On The Hill,” “Scarborough Fair” and “Pretty World.” Those songs featured two female singers on lead vocals; Lani Hall and Janice Hansen—who was replaced in ’69 by Karen Phillip. Hall would later become the second Mrs. Herb Alpert. After the lean years of the entire ‘70s for Mendez and his troupe in the U.S., flash-forward to 1983, when he recorded a remake of a ballad for a new album called Sergio Mendez in ’83 called “Never Gonna Let You Go.”



The single was written by the legendary team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil. This time around, Sergio brought together the vocal prowess of a mainly background singer named Joe Pizzulo, along with Leeza (spelled Leza on the record label) Miller. Joe Pizzulo has recorded back-up vocals for performers like Barry Manilow, David Lee Roth, Janet Jackson, Kenny Loggins, and even Alice Cooper. Miller started out singing as a very young girl for Motown with little success. She also states that her time with Mendez touring the world was wonderful, but they had a falling out when she claimed he didn’t pay her properly for the success of “Never Gonna Let You Go” after it became a big hit, and they parted ways. The song reached No. 5 on the Hot 100 and was in its third of four back-to-back weeks at the zenith of Adult Contemporary Singles chart. The tune had been turned down by Earth, Wind & Fire, but was included as a track on a Dionne Warwick album before Mendez got his crack at it.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“JUICY FRUIT”

Mtume

Epic Records – 03578

Philadelphia musician James Mtume (born James Forman) with his ensemble called Mtume had the No. 1 song on the Hot Black Singles chart this week in ’83 with “Juicy Fruit” on Epic Records. Mtume utilized the vocals of Tawatha Agee as the seductress in the tune. The lyrics had to be toned-down for airplay and for video purposes, but your Biggest Jay gives you the extended and uncensored version for your edification.  



Recorded at a studio in New Jersey, the percussionist/keyboardist Mtume had a million-selling single with “Juicy Fruit” despite the fact that it didn’t even get to the Pop Top 40—stalling at No. 45 on the Hot 100. But “Juicy Fruit” was a massive R&B hit that has been sampled often by other artists since ’83. This track was in the fifth of an ultimate eight survey-phases as the hottest R&B song in America. Mtume had other fairly big R&B hits, but not much mainstream success after this 45 RPM release. Mtume later became a DJ on what used to be called KISS-FM in NYC.

 

THE BIG ALBUMS 

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 2, 1983

TOP POP ALBUMS

 CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

FLASHDANCE:

Original Soundtrack

To The Motion Picture

(Various Artists)

Casablanca Records – 811491-1

Not much could stop Michael Jackson’s Thriller from being the biggest album of the year in ’83, but Flashdance: The Original Soundtrack to the Motion Picture sure gave it a run—at least for a couple of weeks that is. Not only was the single “Flashdance…What A Feeling” by Irene Cara the biggest Pop single in America this week, the soundtrack was at the end of a two-week run at the peak of the Top LPs & Tapes Chart.



Released as another single from the soundtrack, the song “Maniac” by Michael Sembello and produced by Phil Ramone reached the high point of the Hot 100 Singles chart on the listing for the week ending on September 10, 1983 for a two survey-period stay on top. He had his own album as well titled Bossa Nova Hotel on Warner Bros. Records. Michael Sembello was a session musician on dozens of recordings for other artists including Stevie Wonder on his Songs In The Key Of Life album. The rest of the Flashdance soundtrack album consisted of instrumental songs from the film plus vocal tunes from Donna Summer, Laura Branigan, Kim Carnes, and others.

 

HOT BLACK ALBUMS

CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

THRILLER

Michael Jackson

Epic Records – 38112

The current single from Thriller by Michael Jackson was “Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’” on Epic Records.



That song was the fourth single from the landmark LP that (this week in ’83) was in the 23rd of an ultimate 37 non-consecutive weeks over a nearly two-year span in the No. 1 position on the Hot Black Albums Chart. The album was more than halfway there to becoming the biggest selling album of all time.

 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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