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The Week of June 13th, 2014






THE BIG SINGLES   

 

For the Week Ending June 14, 1966

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK:

 

No. 5 (LW 6) “STRANGERS IN THE NIGHT”

Frank Sinatra – Reprise -- 0470  

No. 4 (LW 4) “When A Man Loves A Woman

Percy Sledge – Atlantic -- 2326

No. 3 (LW 3) “I AM A ROCK

Simon & Garfunkel – Columbia – 43617

No. 2 (LW 2) “DID YOU EVER HAVE TO MAKE UP YOUR MIND

The Lovin’ Spoonful – Kama Sutra – 209

No. 1  

(Last Week No. 1):

“PAINT IT, BLACK”

The Rolling Stones

 London Records -- 901

This was the second of two back-to-back weeks in the top slot on the Hot 100 Singles chart this week in ’66 for the Rolling Stones and their third U.S. No. 1 single, “Paint It, Black” on the London Records label—Decca Records in the U.K. Brian Jones had just returned from a sitar lesson from George Harrison, and quickly came up with the signature sound for the next totally different single from the previously predominant Blues-based band. The 45 RPM release was the progeny of the LP Aftermath; but only in the U.S. Once again, the Rolling Stones chose to record this track in Los Angeles at the RCA Studios. Keith Richards claimed the cut got its punch from bass player Bill Wyman when he used his fists to hit the organ pedals at the bottom of the instrument. That’s arranger and L.A. keyboard player and good friend of the group Jack Nitzsche on the piano on the tune. The American version of Aftermath had a different cover photo and was blue instead of the U.K.’s version that was a washed-out red shade on that picture. Our version lopped-off four of the intended songs, but London Records added “Paint It, Black” which was planned as a single-only release in Britain. Those four sliced songs ended up on other U.S. releases, much like what happened to early Beatles LPs.     

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1):

“Strangers In The Night”

Frank Sinatra

Reprise Records – 0470


 

Ole’ Blue Eyes was back. Frank Sinatra had not had a No. 1 record since “Learnin’ The Blues” in 1955. “Strangers In The Night” (recorded on April 11, 1966) came from the film A Man Could Get Killed, starring James Garner, Melina Mercouri, Sandra Dee and Anthony Franciosa. The song’s English lyrics were written by Charles “Hoss” Singleton, and Eddie Snyder, with the music composed by Burt Kaempfert. One version of the story of the making of the song has Kaempfert (the first man to properly record the Beatles in Germany) has him purchasing the melody from the original writer Ivo Robic. On the Sinatra single, Robic’s name isn’t there. But someone had to come up with the original Yugoslavian lyrics, and that has been documented. Some music sleuths contend Kaempfert DID write it with someone entirely different; Marija Renota. And yet another writer claims to have penned the tune alone; originally called “Broken Guitar” by a guy named Avo Uvezian. Because of the disputes, royalties for the song were held up for years. For usage in the film, the instrumental track was originally titled “Beddie’s Theme”—a reference to Garner’s character William Beddoes. Purportedly, Connie Francis recorded the tune just over a week before Sinatra, but it never released. Crooner Jack Jones was the first to release it, without having the hit. The Sinatra record (featuring “Wrecking Crew member Glen Campbell on guitar) produced by Jimmy Bowen, sold over a million copies, and was the next to last No. 1 Hot 100 hit for “The Chairman-of-the-Board” of Reprise Records. Sinatra hated the song— REALLY loathed it. What did he know? The Grammy® folks disagreed and named it Record of the Year. The record-buying public bought over a million copies. 

TOP SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES

CHART:

No. 1

“HOLD ON I’M COMING”

Sam & Dave

Stax Records – 189

 

You would never know it, but Sam & Dave (Sam Moore and Dave Prater) didn’t like each other. They never entered the stage from the same side during live performances. AND Dave wasn’t able to do harmony with Sam, so if they sang together, they used the same notes, or used a call-and-response scenario. Listen to ANY song by this soul duo and you’ll hear it. This week’s No. 1 Top Rhythm & Blues Single (it’s only seven-day survey-period) was composed by the one and only Isaac Hayes, along with his writing partner and Songwriters Hall of Fame member David Porter. The legend goes that Hayes tried to cajole Porter out of the bathroom at the Stax complex in South Memphis, as studio time was precious, and heard him say, “Hold on, I’m coming!” That’s all it took to make one of the best soul records of the era. The usual studio musicians at that time were basically Booker T & the M.G.’s, including Duck Dunn on bass, Steve Cropper on guitar and Al Jackson, Jr. Did you know that Booker T. Jones played a TUBA underneath the bass pattern of Dunn’s bass? True dat.

 

THE BIG ALBUMS

For the Week Ending June 14, 1966

TOP LPS CHART:

No. 1 

(Last Week No. 1)

WHAT NOW MY LOVE

Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass

A&M Records – 4114

The roots of this song started in France, when composer/singer Gilbert Bécaud wrote a tune called “Et Maintenant” in ’61, becoming a major hit in that country. The translation was “What Now My Love” and the English words were created by Big-Band-era lyricist Carl Sigman. Move up to 1966, and Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass had the No. 1 album on the Top Pop LPs chart with the ‘new’ song “What Now My Love” as the title track. What Now My Love was the ensemble’s sixth studio album, and within the fourth of an eventual eight consecutive weeks in that position on A&M Records. Truth be told, it was only Alpert who performed on the track; as the Tijuana Brass was actually the crack studio musicians later dubbed “The Wrecking Crew” in L.A. For touring purposes, Alpert had hired-hands usually dressed in Mexican garb to perform. “What Now My Love” was released as a single, the only 45 RPM from the LP to chart; reaching No. 24 on the Hot 100. The picture on the front of the LP featured Alpert and his partner Herb Moss’ wife (A&M) Sandra Moss clinging on to Herb.  

 

TOP SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES LPS

CHART:

No. 1 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

LOU RAWLS LIVE!

Lou Rawls came out of the shadows of his association, and then the death of Sam Cooke, with his own variety of swingin' jazz and soul-stirrin’ blues tunes with this live album that was the principal record on the Top Selling R&B LPs chart this week in ’66. Lou Rawls LIVE! didn’t have any Pop hits on this album, but it resonated with a Middle-of-the-Road and Jazz-leaning R&B crowd with his rendition of “The Shadow Of Your Smile” from the film The Sandpiper.  This was Rawls’ first chart hit on the Top Selling R&B chart at No. 33. The LP was recorded live over the course of two nights in late January and early February in Los Angeles at the studios of Capitol Records with an invited audience attending. Even though he had a minor Pop chart his in ’65, it wasn’t until later in ’66 (after this live album was released) that Rawls would have his breakthrough mass-appeal Pop hit with “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing.”

 


Big Jay’s Big Records

This Week in 1971

THE BIG SINGLES 

For the Week Ending June 19, 1971

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES THIS WEEK:

No. 5 (LW 6)IT DON’T COME EASY”   

Ringo Starr – Apple – 1831

No. 4 LW 2)“BROWN SUGAR”

The Rolling Stones – Rolling Stones – 19100

No. 3 (LW 1)“WANT ADS”  

The Honey Cones – Hot Wax – 7011

No. 3(LW 2)“RAINY DAYS AND MONDAYS”

The Carpenters – A&M – 1260

No. 1

(Last Week No. 6)

“IT’S TOO LATE /

“I FEEL THE EARTH MOVE”

Carole King

Ode Records – 66015

The Billboard Hot 100 chart during the end of 1969, through ‘71 made a short stab at counting certain singles as “double-sided” hits. The first No. 1 song to see that change was “Come Together”/ "Something” by the Beatles. This particular change happened for the first time with the week ending November 29, 1969 and continued through at least 1971 with Rod Stewart’s double-sided No. 1 “Maggie May” / “Reason To Believe.” The magazine make periodic changes to their rules, angering fans of certain artists, as it affects the ranking of No. 1 songs and other chart positions. During the summer of ’71, Carole King enjoyed this alteration of the policy for attaining a chart position with “It’s Too Late” / “I Feel The Earth Move” on Ode Records being labeled a two-sided No. 1 single. The album Tapestry contained both songs and would go on to be one of the most important LPs in music history. The era of the ‘singer/songwriter’ was in full-swing, with King entering the world of lyrics, formerly done by her partner and one-time husband Gerry Goffin. They had split in 1968, and by 1970, she (reluctantly at first) found the courage to pen words to her own melodies. Oddly perhaps, “It’s Too Late” had lyrics written by Toni Stern. The song “It’s Too Late” was named Record of the Year at the Grammy® Awards, with King also receiving a trophy for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. With a group called simply the City, she recorded her new songs with producer Lou Adler. Tapestry went on to sell over 10 million copies in the U.S. alone. The other surface of the double A sided 45 RPM was written by King alone, “I Feel The Earth Move”—female libido perhaps explained precisely for the first time on a record by a Pop singer/songwriter.


 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

CHART:

 

No. 1

 (Last Week No. 1)

“RAINY DAYS AND MONDAYS”

Carpenters

A&M Records – 1260

This record just missed being the biggest hit in the land on the Hot 100, but fitting the description of “Easy Listening” perfectly, the brother/sister act Carpenters hit the heights on this chart this week in ’71. This was the last of four uninterrupted weeks as this chart’s leader; their fourth up to this point. The tune was written by Paul Williams and Roger Nichols, who had both written “We’ve Only Just Begun,” a previous hit for Carpenters. That song had been put together as a radio commercial for a bank by the writing team, sung by Williams. “Rainy Days And Mondays” became the duos fourth million-selling single. Some of the usual suspects from L.A.’s “Wrecking Crew” performed much of the music on the track, including Richard Carpenter’s keyboards and the soothing voice of his sister Karen. The single was taken from their then current album simply called Carpenters, and also featured their next A&M Records single, also a million-selling 45 RPM release, “Superstar.” Karen Carpenter passed away in February of 1983, less than a month shy of what was her 33rd birthday. 

BEST SELLING

SOUL SINGLES

CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“WANT ADS”

The Honey Cone

Hot Wax Records – 7011

The Honey Cone was enjoying their last of three non-consecutive weeks in the pinnacle position on the Best Selling Soul Singles chart. The women in the trio was superb singers; Darlene Love’s sister, Edna Wright, along with Carolyn Willis (you may remember her name from the Seals & Crofts song “Get Closer” later in the ‘70s) and Shelly Clark, a one-time member of the Phil Spector-produced group Bob B. Soxx & the Blue Jeans from the early ‘60s. The Honey Cone also benefited from their alliance with Holland-Dozier-Holland; the former production and writing team at Motown Records until they left over a dispute about money and more artistic independence. They started their own production company and a couple of record companies including the Invictus and Hot Wax labels. This week in ‘71’s No. 1 Best Selling Soul Singles chart was headed by “Want Ads.” Many radio stations played the longer version of the song from the Honey Cone album Sweet Replies. “Want Ads” showed up again on the follow-up album featuring “Stick Up” called Soulful Tapestry. “Stick Up” was recorded before “Want Ads,” but wasn’t deemed good enough initially to be released as a single. Also, two other acts gave the song “Want Ads” a try before everyone agreed the version featuring Edna Wright on the resolute lead vocal. The writers of “Want Ads” were NOT Holland-Dozier-Holland, but were General Johnson, the leader of Chairmen of the Board (who had recently hit it big with “Give Me Just A Little More Time”) along with Greg Perry and Barney Perkins. Due to legal reasons lingering after their split from Berry Gordy, Jr., Eddie and Brian Holland, along with Lamont Dozier used pseudonyms for their production and writing credits on their two labels, taking names from friends and other family members and, if all three wrote a song together, they were usually listed as one person named Edythe Wayne!

 

THE BIG ALBUMS

For the Week Ending June 19, 1971

TOP LPS CHART:

No. 1 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

TAPESTRY

Carole King

Ode Records – 77009

This week was the initial seven-day survey-period in the No. 1 spot on the Top LPs chart for the milestone album from Carole King on Ode Record called Tapestry. Lou Adler produced the LP with several of the songs coming from the pen of King, along with a few selections from other artists; notably James Taylor’s “You’ve Got A Friend.” A trio of songs were co-written by her one-time husband Gerry Goffin and included on the record. Tapestry would go on to be in the No. 1 position for 15 back-to-back weeks. (*See above for more about Carole King.)

 

BEST SELLING

SOUL LPs

CHART:

No. 1

 

ARETHA LIVE AT FILLMORE WEST

Atlantic Records – 7205

Aretha Franklin’s then current single was the double A sided chart hits, “Bridge Over Troubled Water” b/w “Brand New Me” on Atlantic Records. “Bridge” had just spent a recent week at No. 1 on the Best Selling Soul Singles chart. On her current album, the glorious Aretha Live At Fillmore West, she included the Paul Simon song done in the concert setting. (*Hear the live version from this week’s No. 1 album on the Best Selling Soul LPs chart above.) The concerts were recorded on three successive nights in San Francisco at the Fillmore West on South Van Ness Avenue on March 5, 6 and 7, 1971. This LP was released on May 19, 1971 with backing by Billy Preston, King Curtis & the Kingpins, as well as the Memphis Horns and a cameo appearance by Ray Charles with ‘The Queen of Soul’ on the reprise of her 1970 hit, “Spirit In The Dark” during an encore. Several recent singles from ‘Sister Soul’ were given the live treatment, and she tore the joint up with her early Atlantic hits, “Respect” along with “Dr. Feelgood” the A and B side of her landmark 1967 masterpiece. In 2005, a Rhino re-release was issued on a four-CD set of the complete concerts labeled as Don’t Fight The Feeling: The Complete Aretha Franklin & King Curtis Live At Fillmore West.


THE BIG SINGLES 

For the Week Ending June 19, 1982

HOT 100 TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK:

No. 5 (LW 5) “ALWAYS ON MY MIND”

Willie Nelson – Columbia – 02741

No. 4 (LW 4)“THE OTHER WOMAN”

Ray Parker, Jr. – Arista – 0669

No. 3 (LW 7) “ROSANNA”

Toto – Columbia – 02811

No. 2 (LW 3) “DON’T YOU WANT ME”

The Human League – A&M/Virgin – 2397

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“EBONY AND IVORY”

Paul McCartney

with Vocals by Stevie Wonder

Columbia Records -- 02860

Produced by Paul McCartney’s longtime cohort, George Martin, the No. 1 45 RPM on the Hot 100 Singles chart was a duet with Stevie Wonder on the track “Ebony And Ivory.” This Columbia Records release from the LP Tug Of War was in its sixth of an ultimate seven weeks at the peak of Pop music during this seven-day survey-week in ’82. Martin claims that Sir Paul was inspired to write the song by a quote from the English musician/actor/comedian Spike Milligan (a very influential person from the comedy act The Goon Show on the BBC when the Beatles were young) claiming, “Black notes, white notes, you need to play the two to make harmony, folks!” “Ebony And Ivory” had the longest-running stay at the top of the Hot 100 by any post-Beatles McCartney single in the U.S.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY

TRACKS

CHART

No. 1

“ANY DAY NOW”

Ronnie Milsap

RCA Records – 13216

This was the first of five back-to-back weeks atop the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart for Country-crossover artist, Ronnie Milsap. His remake of the song “Any Day Now” resonated with a pop audience and the Country crowd as well. The song has roots all the way back to 1962 when Burt Bacharach and late lyricist Bob Hilliard wrote the song, first hitting the charts that year by Uptown-Soul artist Chuck Jackson. At that time, the song was listed as “Any Day Now (My Wild Beautiful Bird.)” Flash-forward to ’82 and Milsap’s RCA Records version reached the pinnacle position on the Country Singles chart, and No. 14 on the Hot 100 Singles chart; taken from his then current album Inside.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“LET IT WHIP”

Dazz Band

The Dazz Band was wearing the crown of the Hot Soul Singles chart this week in ’82 with their biggest hit, “Let It Whip” on Motown Records. This was the fourth of five non-consecutive seven-day survey-periods to attain the No. 1 position. Hailing from Cleveland, Ohio, the funk group got to the No. 5 slot on the Hot 100 Singles list and also landed at No. 2 on the Hot Dance/Disco Singles chart. “Let It Whip” garnered the Dazz Band a Grammy® for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. The song was penned by the co-producers Reggie Andrews and Leon “Ndugu” Chancler—who not long after “Let It Whip” was recorded—famously played drums on some minor song named “Billie Jean” by one Michael Jackson.

 

THE BIG ALBUMS 

For the Week Ending June 19, 1982

TOP LPs & TAPE

 CHART:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 2)

ASIA

Asia

Geffen Records – M5 2008

 

This album was the biggest LP in America in 1982. Asia was the name of the debut set by the group Asia and it was in the first of seven consecutive weeks at the helm of the Top LPs & Tape chart for this survey period in ’82. This collection of tracks was recorded in London during 1981 and was released in the U.S. on March 18, 1982. The group featured former Yes guitarist Steve Howe, Geoff Downes, another former Yes member and keyboard player, Carl Palmer, the former drummer with Emerson, Lake & Palmer, and vocalist John Wetton who had fronted several English bands including: Uriah Heap, Wishbone Ash, King Crimson, Roxy Music and others. This ‘Supergroup’ came out of the box with their version of Progressive Rock with their first single on Geffen Records “Heat Of The Moment,” reaching No. 4 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and No. 1 on the Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks survey. The follow-up single was “Only Time Will Tell” reaching No. 17 on the Hot 100. The very cool logo and cover art on the LP were illustrated by Roger Dean who also worked on Yes album sleeves. Minus Steve Howe, the group continues with original members along with new guitarist, England-born Sam Coulson, who was discovered (of all places) on a YouTube video.

 

HOT SOUL ALBUMS

CHART:

No. 1

Keep It Live

Dazz Band

Motown Records – 6004

(See above video)

 

There was just this one week in ’82 for the group Dazz Band in the top slot with their LP Keep It Live on Motown Records. The name of Dazz Band was literally ripped off from the title of a 1977 song by Brick called Dazz; which meant the blending of Disco and Jazz—or Dazz. This album featured this week’s Hot Soul Singles chart-leader, “Let It Whip.” (*See above) Dazz Band was initially called Kinsman Dazz and at the outset signed by 20th Century Fox Records. In 1980, the decision to compress the name to Dazz Band was made and they were signed to Motown Records. The group had one more reasonably known single called “Joystick” in 1984.

 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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