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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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July 25th, 2014






THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

July 30, 1966

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

No. 5 (LW 9) “I SAW HER AGAIN”

The Mamas & The PapasDunhill4031

No. 4 (LW 4) “THE PIED PIPER”  

Crispian St. Peter Jamie1320

No. 3 (LW 3)“LIL’ RED RIDING HOOD”

Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs MGM13506

No. 2 (LW 2) “HANKY PANKY”

Tommy James and the Shondells Roulette4686

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“WILD THING”

The Troggs

Fontana Records1548

AND

ATCO Records6415

 

 

With this 45 RPM release, it was the first and only time the same exact No. 1 recording appeared on two different record labels simultaneously. It happened only in North America with “Wild Thing” by the Troggs; No. 1 this week in ’66 on the Hot 100 Singles chart for the first of two eventual back-to-back survey-periods. The tune was written by Chip Taylor, a/k/a James Wesley Voight. Yes, he’s the brother of actor Jon Voight and thus the uncle of Angelina Joli. Taylor was also the writer of “Angel Of The Morning” made a hit by the Pacific Northwest group Merrilee Rush and the Troubadours in ‘67.


There were a few things dissimilar on the 45 RPM labels.  First was the name of the writer of the song. On the Fontana release (the label that released it in the U.K. originally) it was correctly attributed to Chip Taylor. On the ATCO version, it was listed as written by Presley—as in Reg Presley, the leader of the Troggs. That was incorrect. On the Fontana issue, the producer was listed as a “Page One Production, England.” On the ATCO label, it said “A Larry Page Production -- Recorded in England.” Also, the running-time of the song was different. On Fontana, it was shown as 2:30. Over on the ATCO release it was 2:35. Now for NON-Record Pigs, these things seem insignificant. But if you’re into the minutia of records, stuff like this is intriguing. The moniker the Troggs was short for the Troglodytes, their name just prior to putting “Wild Thing” to tape. It’s been reported that the band recorded the song in two takes, along with another song “With A Girl Like You” (an even bigger hit in the U.K. than “Wild Thing” only No. 2 there) during a short 45-minute recording session; including the time to load their instruments and equipment in and out of the studio to and from their van. The Troggs’ recording is a prototype for future garage/punk music. It must be said that there was an earlier release of “Wild Thing” which was an almost note-for-note replica of the demo done by Chip Taylor, made by a group called Jordan Christopher and the Wild Ones. That version didn’t come close to making noise. The Troggs’ second biggest hit in America was the ballad “Love Is All Around.” Reg Presley (born Reginald Maurice Ball and given the name Presley by a music journalist) died at age 71 in February of 2013. Ronnie Bond, the band’s drummer died in 1992.

 

EASY LISTNING SINGLES CHART
THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“SOMEWHERE MY LOVE”

Ray Conniff and the Singers

Columbia Records43626

Former Artie Shaw big-band arranger, Joseph Raymond (Ray) Conniff became an orchestra and chorus leader and signed by Mitch Miller to work for Columbia Records. This week’s top Easy Listening Singles chart-leader was “Somewhere, My Love” which was (initially incidental music) “Lara’s Theme from Dr. Zhivago,” the film starring Omar Sharif, Julie Christie, Rod Steiger, Alec Guinness and Geraldine Chaplin—Charlie’s daughter. Ray Conniff’s version of the often-recorded “Somewhere, My Love” was the biggest hit rendition; even reaching No. 9 on the Hot 100 Singles chart in ’66.



Ray Conniff had many albums during his time with Columbia Records. In fact, I played many of these “Middle-of-the-Road” tracks during my first job on the radio in 1970. His recordings were usually remakes of recent hits or themed albums, laced with very lush orchestration and the addition of large choruses. Conniff was also a prolific songwriter. But for “Somewhere, My Love,” the writers were music composer Maurice Jarre, (originally just called “Lara’s Theme”) with lyrics added later specifically for Connie Francis by Paul Francis Webster. The Jersey Girl thought the lyrics were too, “Corny,” and passed on recording it originally. She did end up doing it, but because of that hesitation, it was Conniff who had the hit with “Somewhere, My Love” in this the first of four consecutive weeks on the Easy Listening Singles chart, listed as Ray Conniff and his Singers; later shortened to Ray Conniff Singers. Conniff died after a fall in his bathtub in 2002 as he neared his 86th birthday.

 

TOP SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES CHART 
THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“AIN’T TOO PROUD TO BEG”

 

The Temptations

Gordy Records 7054

In ’66, “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” from the Temptations was in the fifth of a concluding eight non-consecutive weeks at the climax of the Top Selling R&B Singles chart. The song was produced by Norman Whitfield and co-written by him and legendary lyric-writer Eddie Holland, Jr.



The success of “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” with Whitfield as the producer, led to Smokey Robinson losing his post as the vocal group’s main muse. Whitfield would slowly evolve the Temptations from a luxuriant R&B sound into a blending of rock and more sophisticated soul grooves. In fact, the Temptations didn’t realize the immediate success of the song, and were ordered to perform “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” on American Bandstand as a last-minute substitution, having to improvise dance steps minutes before the broadcast nationally. The 45 RPM reached No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was released from the album Gettin’ Ready, which also featured the previous single “Get Ready,” deemed a failure by Berry Gordy’s standards. That single only garnered the maximum position of No. 29 on the Hot 100—though it did reach the top of the R&B chart. 

 

THE

BIG  ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

July 30, 1966

TOP LPS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

No. 1

YESTERDAY AND TODAY

The Beatles

Capitol Records2553

What a hot mess 1966 was for the Beatles, despite their continued sales acumen. They had issues during their tour of Japan due to some people there thinking they desecrated the venue with amplified music (Budokan Hall) and their quick tour of the Philippines didn’t fare any better, as they were accused of dissing Imelda Marcos, wife of the country’s leader, after they were reportedly invited to the ruling palace, but didn’t show up because they were never officially notified. At first, they were not allowed to leave the country due to that situation, in addition to a tax issue with the promoter of their shows there. The Fabs barely escaped the airport in Manila with their lives. Finally safely back in Merry-Old England, the Beatles wanted something a bit avant-garde for the cover of an album they really didn’t want released in the first place in America. And if they wanted to create another instantaneous hullabaloo, this was the way to do it. The photograph on the front cover of the album called Yesterday And Today featured a picture snapped by Robert Whitaker. The Mop-Tops had been photographed so many times, that by 1966 they weren’t interested in the typical poses. So Whitaker’s idea of using pieces of meat and decapitated dolls strewn about the image captivated the group. They only knew these photos would be used for promotional purposes. As we’ve discussed previously, Capitol Records was up to its usual shenanigans with getting the most out of Beatles material. For this “new” LP in the U.S. and Canada, they took a few songs off of their most recent British LPs. From the album Help!, they grabbed the song “Yesterday” along with “Act Naturally,” already the A and B side of an American single and by now nearly a year old. Then, the U.S. record company added another American single, “Nowhere Man,” and “What Goes On” from their British album Rubber Soul to the LP. Not done yet with the mischief, Capitol also included the singles cuts “We Can Work It Out,” and “Day Tripper” with tracks from the forthcoming album Revolver including: “Dr. Robert,” “I’m Only Sleeping” plus “And Your Bird Can Sing.”



Capitol now had their own full-blown controversy and had to recall the LP and replace the “butcher sleeve” with a more conventional cover featuring the Fab Four posing with travel trunks. The original albums was speedily asked to be returned from stores and other sources (many of the 750,000 copies were sent back to Capitol) costing the company scads of cash. Of course, there were a good amount of copies that weren’t returned. The ones that were, were given a pasted-on new cover and sent back to stores. The value today of both of those versions are among the most collectible and valuable LPs in the history of recorded music. The Mono versions are far less collectible than the Stereo versions, as the record label had pressed far less of the Stereophonic editions. And even though the song sequence was not what the Beatles intended, it was still a decent album—if for no other reason—we here in the Colonies got to hear some songs that had not been released yet across the pond. But the controversy over Yesterday And Today paled in comparison to the upcoming firestorm caused by John Lennon’s five month-old comments about the group being more popular than Jesus in a publication; culminating in a nervous apology in the coming weeks in ’66.  

 

TOP SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No. 1

 

GETTIN’ READY

The Temptations

Gordy Records918

 

The 45 RPM release of “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” reached No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was included on the album Gettin’ Ready, this week’s No. 1 on the Top Selling R&B LPs chart. This was first of a definitive six non-consecutive weeks in the pinnacle position of that listing. The album also featured the previous single “Get Ready,” judged a failure by Berry Gordy, even though it conquered the top of the R&B chart. The Motown chief wanted more of a mainstream victory by his flagship male vocal faction. Not to worry, as Robinson was already cemented in the Vice President position with Motown and Gordy’s best bud.



Paradoxically, “Get Ready” became a Motown standard in the years following its release and was remade by a Caucasian rock band called Rare Earth (on the Motown rock subsidiary label also called Rare Earth Records) with their hugely edited rendition of a 21 minute track attaining the No. 4 slot on the Hot 100 with vocals by the band’s drummer, Pete Rivera. “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” was also remade into a hit again in ’74 by the Rolling Stones featuring Billy Preston on piano reaching No. 17 on the Hot 100. 

 




THE

BIG SINGLES 

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 28, 1973

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘73:

No. 5 (LW 2)“WILL IT GO ROUND IN CIRCLES”

Billy Preston A&M1411

No. 4 (LW 7)“SMOKE ON THE WATER”

Deep Purple Warner Bros.7710

No. 3 (LW 4)“SHAMBALA”

Three Dog Night Dunhill/ABC4352

No. 2 (LW 3)“YESTERDAY ONCE MORE”

Carpenters A&M1446

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“BAD, BAD LEROY BROWN”

Jim Croce

ABC Records11359

 

The second biggest hit 45 RPM of 1973 was “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” by singer/songwriter Jim Croce on ABC Records. This was the second and final week at the Hot 100 Singles chart’s chief recording. The song was about a real-life character that Croce met in the service. Croce (a native of South Philadelphia) not only led the Pop chart, he also gained the No. 9 position on the Easy Listening Singles chart with the track from his album Life And Times.



Little did Jim Croce know, the album title Life And Times would be prophetic, as he, along with his guitar accompanist and Jersey boy Maury Muehleisen along with Jim’s road manager, booking agent, a comedian and the pilot on board an aircraft bound for Sherman, Texas died as they were taking off at the airport in Natchitoches, Louisiana on September 20, 1973. The song “I Got A Name” was ready to be released by ABC Records as the new single the following day. The album was produced by Muehleisen’s fellow New Jersey native Terry Cashman and Tommy West, who along with a guy named Gene Pistilli (another Jersey dude) had a minor hit (No. 22) with “Medicine Man” as the Buchannan Brothers in 1969. Cashman & West also recorded a mini-masterpiece called “American City Suite” which garnered a lot of airplay on FM progressive radio in New York in ’72. Croce’s music continued to succeed after his death with hits including the No. 1 song “Time In A Bottle,” the Christmas evergreen “It Doesn’t Have To Be That Way” and his final Top 10 hit, the No. 9 45 RPM release “I’ll Have To Say I Love You In A Song.”   

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART
THIS WEEK IN ‘73

 

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“YESTERDAY ONCE MORE”

Carpenters

A&M Records – 1446

 

This was the third and concluding week as the leader of the Easy Listening Singles chart this week in ’73 for Carpenters on A&M Records with “Yesterday Once More.” This track sprang from the similarly themed album titled Now & Then. The song was featured as the opening track on side-two of the album, just before a lengthy medley of Carpenters remakes of oldies from the early ‘60s. “Yesterday Once More” was their eighth million-selling single.



The lead single from the Now & Then LP (the name suggested by the duo’s mom Agnes Carpenter) was “Sing” which was used on TV’s Sesame Street originally and written by one of the show’s staff songwriters, Joe Raposo. He wrote the theme to the children’s program as well as for other TV hits including: Shining Time Station, The Electric Company, Three’s Company and its spin-off The Ropers to name a few. Raposo passed away in 1989. Karen and Richard produced this album which also included another remake that was a hit in other countries. “Jambalaya (On The Bayou)”—the Hank Williams classic—was not released as a single in the U.S. Karen Carpenter died at age 32 in 1983.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“I BELIEVE IN YOU (YOU BELIEVE IN ME)”

Johnnie Taylor

Stax Records0161

One of R&B music’s most prolific entertainers who started out as a Gospel singer in the ‘50s, and ended up doing more sophisticated Soul in the ‘70s with his biggest hit “Disco Lady,” set the tone in ’73 with this week’s No. 1 45 RPM on the Hot Soul Singles chart with “I Believe In You (You Believe In Me)” on Stax Records.



The song was in the peak position for this the second of a two-week run in ‘73. This Soul standard showed the power of Taylor’s work, and he was rewarded with his second and final million-selling single for Stax. The track began at Muscle Shoals Sound studio in Alabama, along with the famed Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section and was completed at the Detroit studio of Taylor’s producer Don Davis. The song was strong enough to reach No. 11 on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart. Taylor’s “Disco Lady” in ’76 sold well over two-million copies on Columbia Records. Soul man Taylor died in 2000 at age 66 at a hospital in Dallas, Texas. He had been working as a radio personality at radio station KKDA-FM in the Metroplex.

THE

BIG ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

July 18, 1970

TOP LPS & TAPE CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73:

No. 1

CHICAGO VI

Chicago

Columbia Records32400

It was the initial week of five non-consecutive survey-periods in ‘73 for the fifth STUDIO album from the band formerly-known as Chicago Transit Authority—now just Chicago—with their album titled Chicago VI on Columbia Records. This was the first of several Chicago albums to be recorded in the Rocky Mountains at the Caribou Ranch in Nederland, Colorado after all of their previous records recorded in New York. It must have taken a few extra breaths from the band’s horn-section to get the notes out of their instruments being over eight thousand-feet in the air. The first single from the LP rocked with power chords from Terry Kath’s guitar and explosive drumming from long-time drummer Danny Seraphine. The song was sung largely by bass player and future solo-star Peter Cetera. The song was written by trombone wiz James Pankow along with Cetera and reached No. 10 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was in the middle of its strong summer run this week in ’73.



The follow-up single from Chicago VI was also written by Jimmy Pankow, and this time they had their second million-selling single. Can you guess what the first one was? If you said “Saturday In The Park” from Chicago V, you’d be correct. Pankow’s “Just You ‘N’ Me” was released as a single in early September and climbed all the way to the No. 4 slot on the Hot 100 in addition to reaching No. 7 on the Easy Listening Singles chart. This song foresaw a new direction for the band, focusing on ballads sung by Cetera until he was booted from the ensemble in 1985—a pronouncement made by group members and management. Cetera had several solo successes including two No. 1 songs. Innovative (especially during their early years) your Big Jay wonders WHY Chicago is NOT in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame? Chicago, with the three-man original horn section consisting of Pankow, trumpeter Lee Loughnane, woodwind player Walt Parazaider and keyboard/singer/songwriter Robert Lamm, still tour and record with newer members today.

HOT SOUL ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

No. 1

BACK TO THE WORLD

Curtis Mayfield

Curtom Records 8015

Back To The World was the third solo album for Impressions co-founder Curtis Mayfield on his own Curtom Records. The album was No. 1 on the Hot Soul Albums chart this week in ’73; the second of two back-to-back survey-periods to hit the heights. The “Gentle Genius” had scored big with his songs from the so-called “blaxploitation” film Superfly, with the title track and the first song released as a single, “Freddie’s Dead.” Both songs were million-selling singles in ’72. This new album the following year wasn’t nearly as successful, but it did feature the single “Future Shock.”



In addition, further singles from Back To The World included: “If I Were Only A Child Again,” “Can’t Say Nothing” and the album title-track political statement about the returning GI’s from Southeast Asia called “Back To The World.” In addition to the album reaching the top of the Hot Soul Albums chart, Back To The World got to a respectable No. 16 at the Pop side on the Top LPs & Tape chart. Mayfield had several more albums in him, but the hits dried up on the Pop singles lists in ’75. Curtis was severely injured when lighting equipment fell on him at Wingate Field in Brooklyn, New York during a concert and was paralyzed for the rest of his life, but still managed to make music. Mayfield received a Grammy® Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995. He was later inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, but was too ill from diabetes to attend that March, 1999 ceremony, and succumbed to the disease that December in Georgia.   

 


THE

BIG SINGLES 

For the Chart-Week Ending

July 27, 1985

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘85:

 

No. 5 (LW 7 )“IF YOU LOVE SOMEONE SET THEM FREE”

Sting A&M2738

No. 4 (LW 1 )“A VIEW TO A KILL”

Duran Duran Capitol5475

No. 3 (LW 4 )“YOU GIVE GOOD LOVE”

Whitney Houston Arista9274

No. 2 (LW 9 )“SHOUT”

Tears For Fears Mercury880294

 No. 1

(Last Week No. 3)


“EVERYTIME YOU GO AWAY”

Paul Young

Columbia Records04867

 

Paul Young had about a 10-year chart-run, with the high point being this week’s No. 1 song on the Hot 100 Singles chart. “Everytime You Go Away” was an album track on the Daryl Hall & John Oates album Voices from 1980. Your Biggest Jay interviewed them in my radio studio at the time, and I told Hall & Oates I thought that song should be a single…but did they listen to me? No. But perhaps it was their record company that didn’t believe in it. But my instincts were correct that the SONG would be a hit. So, Englishman Paul Young must have picked up on my initial vibe about the tune and recorded it for his album Secrets Of Association on Columbia, his second album. “Everytime You Go Away” would also have a two-week reign on the Adult Contemporary Singles chart in August of ’85.



Paul Young had various success prior to having one sole week in the No. 1 slot across America. In ’83 he recorded a very cool version of “Wherever I Lay My Hat (That’s My Home) a remake of the Marvin Gaye/Barrett Strong/Norman Whitfield composition from way back in ’62 (recorded by Marvin then) which showed up again in ’69 as the B side to his hit “Too Busy Thinking About My Baby.” Paul Young’s version was a solid No. 1 hit in the U.K. for three weeks in the summer of ’83. It would also have a two-week reign on the Adult Contemporary Singles chart in the U.S. in August of ’85. His version would show up in the film Ruthless People in ’86 after his success with “Everytime You Go Away.” Paul sang at Live Aid in ’85. Young would hang with chart-hits through the late ‘80s with another remake of a Soul classic, “Oh Girl,” the Chi-Lites hit from ’72. Young’s version garnered a No. 8 spot on the Hot 100 and his last hit (No. 22) was another remake of the Motown monster “What Becomes Of The Broken Hearted” made immortal by Jimmy Ruffin in ’66. 

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART THIS WEEK IN ’85:

 

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“WHO’S HOLDING DONNA NOW”

DeBarge

Gordy Records – 1793

If your family had Berry Gordy, Jr., Motown’s founder taking you under his wing, it’s no wonder that DeBarge became stars for a time in the ‘80s. Add David Foster’s keyboards, synthesizer from Toto member Steve Porcaro plus some vocal help by two members of Mr. Mister (then hot with songs like “Broken Wings and “Kyrie”) for this week’s No. 1 song on the Adult Contemporary Singles chart, and it was a ‘couldn’t miss’ situation. “Who’s Holding Donna Now” also attained the No. 6 location on the Hot 100 singles chart during the summer of ’85.  



DeBarge was groomed to be the next Jacksons, and for a time it appeared that could be the case. The DeBarge family was El (Eldra) DeBarge, and his brothers William a/ka Randy, Mark a/k/a Marty, James and sister Etterlene a/k/a Bunny. “Who’s Holding Donna Now” (No. 2 Soul) was on the DeBarge album called Rhythm Of The Night, also the title-track that had gotten to No. 3 Hot 100 (No. 1 Soul) in the Spring of ’85. After that LP was supported on tour, El DeBarge and his sister Bunny decided to leave the family act for solo careers. El succeeded (“Who’s Johnny” from the film Short Circuit in ’86 reached No. 3 Pop in ’86) while his brothers and sister failed to gain traction. Drug addiction and illness has haunted many members of the family since their heyday.   

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART THIS WEEK IN ’85:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“SAVE YOUR LOVE (FOR #1)”

 

René & Angela

Mercury Records – 880731

Here’s yet another case of the biggest hit on the Hot Black Singles chart not even showing up on the Hot 100 Singles chart. René & Angela had the pinnacle position sewn-up for the second of two back-to-back weeks on that chart during this survey-stage in ‘85. It didn’t hurt that rapper Curtis Blow did his thing on this recording.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyM3lQKwDa0

René (real name Jimmy René Moore) along with Angela Winbush met in L.A. in the late ‘70s and had a few “Urban” hits together, including the No. 1 Hot Black Singles chart smash, “Your Smile” on which she sang lead vocals. Winbush was noticed before joining Moore by Stevie Wonder who had heard her sing on a demo recording and promptly made her one of his background singers called Wonderlove. The act broke up acrimoniously over songwriting credits and reported physical violence by Moore inflicted on Winbush according to published reports in ’86. She would later marry, then divorce Ron Isley, lead singer of the Isley Brothers and wrote songs for Janet Jackson, Sheena Easton and Stephanie Mills. 


THE

BIG ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

July 27, 1985

TOP POP

ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘73:

No. 1

SONGS FROM THE BIG CHAIR

Tears For Fears

Mercury Records422-824 300-1

Tears For Fears already had a No. 1 hit on the Hot 100 Singles chart with “Everybody Wants To Rule The World” back in June of ’85 for a couple of weeks, and they’d repeat the feat this coming chart-week replacing Paul Young’s hit (see above) with “Shout,” this time for three ultimate weeks.


Their album Songs From The Big Chair was No. 1 this week in ’85 on the Top Pop Albums chart for the third of what would become five non-consecutive weeks across America. The English band was founded in ’81 by Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith, and they took in Ian Stanley and Manny Alias to fill out the roster. Their producer Chris Hughes provided backing vocals for “Shout,” which reportedly took multiple months to record. Those first two hits in America were released in reverse order in the U.K. The follow-up single to “Shout” here in the U.S., called “Head Over Heels,” reached a respectable No. 3 on the Hot 100.  Songs From The Big Chair was named after ‘the big chair’ featured in the movie Sybil starring Sally Field and Joanne Woodward based on the book by the same name about multiple personalities. Tears For Fears (their name based on the work of Arthur Janov, who advocated primal-scream therapy) had one more big hit in them with “Sowing The Seeds Of Love” (No. 2 Pop) on Fontana Records in 1989.

HOT BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’85:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

ROCK ME TONIGHT

Freddie Jackson

Capitol Records12404

One-time back-up singer for Melba Moore, Freddie Jackson held the peak position on the Hot Black Albums chart this week in ’85 for the fifth of an final 14 non-consecutive survey-periods with his LP Rock Me Tonight. His title track, in reality called “Rock Me Tonight (For Old Times Sake) on Capitol Records, had been No. 1 on the Hot Black Singles chart from the final week of May through the first week of July (six weeks in all) and was his first of 10 total No. 1 tunes on that log; reaching No. 18 on the Hot 100. “Rock Me Tonight (For Old Times Sake)” was the biggest R&B hit of the year for ’85. 


Jackson, born in Harlem, Manhattan, New York, teamed up with songwriter/producer Paul Laurence (who wrote the title track) and scored mega-hits on the Hot Black Singles chart. Jackson’s follow-up single from the LP was “You Are My Lady” and was his highest charting Pop hit on the Hot 100 (No. 12) and went to No. 1 on the R&B chart in October of ’85 for a two-week time in power. He was nominated for two Grammy® Awards for Best New Artist and Best Vocal Performance – Male in his first year on the charts. Jackson is still recording and has a single coming out in weeks in August of ‘14. 


(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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