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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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December 11th, 2014


THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

December 17, 1966


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’66:

 

No. 5 (LW 5) “YOU KEEP ME HANGIN’ ON”

The Supremes MOTOWN1101

No. 4 (LW 4) “DEVIL WITH A BLUE DRESS / GOOD GOLLY MISS MOLLY”

Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels NEW VOICE817

No. 3 (LW 1) “GOOD VIBRATIONS”  

The Beach Boys CAPITOL5676

No. 2 (LW 2) “MELLOW YELLOW” 

DONOVAN EPIC10098

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL”

 

The New Vaudeville Band

 

FONTANA RECORDS1562

Last week (in ’66) “Good Vibrations”—a classic of the era by the Beach Boys—displaced an English studio ensemble for just one survey-phase. That placed “Winchester Cathedral,” already a No. 1 song, in the No. 3 location. But the New Vaudeville Band roared right back to No. 1 this week and next, to be the biggest hit in America on Fontana Records. There was no real ‘band’ so to speak. The New Vaudeville Band was the studio creation of Geoff Stephens, a London record producer. He wrote the song based on a picture he saw on a calendar featuring different cathedrals around England, with the current month showcasing the Winchester Cathedral in Hampshire, Southwest of London. This historic church had roots back to around the year 700. But when the Benedictine monasteries were banned by King Henry VIII; it was re-founded to become a cathedral. It briefly reverted back to a Roman Catholic Church in the 1550’s. It was changed back to the reformed Church of England shortly thereafter. The cathedral is still one of the most cherished houses of worship on the British Isles. Here’s the ‘touring’ version of the New Vaudeville Band on the Hollywood Palace, with guest host Kate Smith, featuring the follow-up (No. 77 Pop) “Peek-A-Boo” and the million-selling single “Winchester Cathedral.”

Those touring musicians were headed by singer/trumpet player Alan Klein (no, not the guy who helped break up the Beatles.) The tune was obviously a throw-back to the style of 1920’s music, complete with a megaphone-like sound, much like Rudy Vallée used in the early era of the recording industry; especially the English Music Hall days. Session singer (and former member of the group The Ivy League) John Carter gets the credit as the singer of the band on the recording. He got that sound by cupping his hand in front of his mouth due to a lack of a real megaphone available. Carter co-wrote ‘60s hits like: “Can’t You Hear My Heartbeat” by Herman’s Hermits (No. 2 Pop) and “Little Bit ‘O Soul” by Music Explosion (No. 2 Pop) and “Beach Baby” (No. 4 Pop) by another studio group First Class in 1974. Producer/songwriter Geoff Stephens was clearly a fan of that ‘20s sound and recreated it with a modern spin. Much to the chagrin of the burgeoning rock & roll community, “Winchester Cathedral” won a Grammy® for Best Contemporary Rock & Roll Recording! Over in Merry-Old-England, the tune won a prestigious Ivor Novello award in the Best Song, Musically and Lyrically category. The record was also No. 1 on the U.S. Easy Listening Singles listing, for this, the third of four ultimate back-to-back weeks in the U.S. Peculiarly, “Winchester Cathedral” only reached No. 4 in England when released.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“WINCHESTER CATHEDRAL”

The New Vaudeville Band

FONTANA RECORDS – 1562


(** See above)

 

 

TOP SELLING

R&B SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


YOU KEEP ME HANGIN’ ON”

The Supremes

MOTOWN RECORDS – 1101 


This was the fourth and last week for “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” to be the principal single on the Top Selling R&B Singles chart. The 45 RPM release had also spent two weeks atop the Hot 100 Singles chart back in November of ’66. This was the eighth chart-capper on the Hot 100 for the Supremes. But since there were no R&B singles charts for the end of ’63, all of ’64 and the first few weeks of 65; mentioning the figures of their No. 1 R&B Billboard chart records on that list is moot. The insistent guitar introduction was added, as one of the producers heard a news introduction on a radio station, and mimicked the sound as an attention grabber. Here’s “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” from TV’s The Hollywood Palace with guest host Herb Alpert looking nervous as heck.  

“You Keep Me Hangin’ On” was inducted into the Grammy® Hall of Fame in 1999 for the song itself. As some of you know, the tune was a hit two more times. First, in 1968, the group Vanilla Fudge did a haunting yet throbbing rock version reaching No. 6 on the Hot 100 featuring Carmine Appice on drums. He was later a member of Rod Stewart’s band in the ‘70s. Stewart had told Appice that he wished he had recorded the song. Carmine told him to do it then. Rod did, and it appeared as an album track on Foot Loose And Fancy Free in ’77, but not released as a single. Move up to 1986, and Kim Wilde had another Hot 100 No. 1 version of “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” recorded as a dance track. Reportedly the song’s three writers (Brian Holland, his brother Eddie and Lamont Dozier) were impressed with her more modern version; but it’s said that the diva Diana Ross didn’t care for it. I’m fairly certain the Holland-Dozier-Holland didn’t mind collecting those royalty checks for yet another version of their worldwide smash reaching the upper end of the charts. As for Diana the Diva—she was just being her usual diva self.

 


THE

BIG

ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

December 17, 1966


TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


THE MONKEES

The Monkees

COLGEMS RECORDS101


This was the seventh of an ultimate 14 back-to-back weeks for the debut LP called The Monkees on Colgems Records. On the reverse side of the album cover, it exclaimed in big letters— “Meet The Monkees”—perhaps a tip-of-the-hat to the Beatles first Capitol American album Meet The Beatles. But the idea for the Monkees came before the Fab Four became well-known even in their native England; as TV and film producers Bert Schneider and Robert Rafelson had the idea of a musical group frolicking on the tube in the early ‘60s. The first single had been released even before the TV show aired on NBC. “Last Train To Clarksville” was indeed an anti-war song (as the Vietnam War was in full-swing) but many of the younger record-buyers didn’t get the impact of the lyrics as written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart who also produced the track.

The Monkees went on to sell over five million copies—but that would be surpassed by the subsequent album, More Of The Monkees, which would replace this album on top of the Top LPs chart. The man largely responsible for at least the initial success of the “Pre-Fab Four” (as they were later dubbed) was music maven Don Kirshner (“The Man with the Golden Ears”) who had a ready-made stable of songwriters at his beck and call. On the record liner notes side of the LP, Kirshner was labeled as the guy in charge of Music Supervision; with Music Coordinators listed as Lester Sill (famous for being Phil Spector’s one-time partner on Philles Records) along with Emil LaViola. LaViola had worked at the large sheet-music company Shapiro-Bernstein before joining Columbia Pictures-Screen Gems Music. Colgems Records was a name derived from those two company monikers. Kirshner had sold his company ALDON Music to Columbia Pictures in the mid-sixties and was given creative control of the music for this TV and records project. That relationship only lasted about one year, as the members of the group famously revolted and threatened to quit en masse unless they were able to gain control of their musical output. The group was successful in getting Kirshner booted.  

 

TOP SELLING R&B LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“SOULIN”

Lou Rawls

CAPITOL RECORDS – 2566


Former Gospel singer Lou Rawls had his second No. 1 album this week on the Top Selling R&B LPs chart with his long-player Soulin’ on Capitol Records. His first No. 1 was Lou Rawls Live which had been on top of that chart for a total of 12 survey-periods earlier in ’66. Rawls’ album called Soulin’ ended up with a total of nine weeks in the pinnacle position on this chart and was currently in the eighth week of its run there. The breakthrough single for Rawls (from this LP) after his dismal debut with a previous 45 RPM was “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing.” The song reached No. 13 on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart, but saw its strength on the R&B listing. He sings the song like a man who’s lived too long with heartache quite convincingly. Here’s a TV appearance by Lou Rawls singing his first big hit.

It should be noted that Lou Rawls was one of the opening acts for the Beatles in Cincinnati at Crosley Field on August 21, 1966 just before “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing” took off. There were both on Capitol Records, so draw your own conclusions. Rawls had been associated with Sam Cooke; even replacing him in the Gospel group the Highway QC’s when Cooke left to join the Soul Stirrers. Rawls had been in a car crash in 1958 and was in a coma for about a week. He recovered after a quite lengthy rehabilitation. After Sam switched to secular music, Rawls did the same and signed with Capitol. The same year, Lou sang with Cooke on songs like “Bring It On Home To Me,” “That’s Where It’s At” and “Having A Party.” Lou Rawls went on to win three Grammy® Awards for Best R&B Male Performance during his career. Rawls died of lung and brain cancer on January 6, 2006 in Los Angeles.

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week ENDING

December 18, 1976


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘76:


No. 5 (LW 6) “YOU MAKE ME FEEL LIKE DANCING”

Leo Sayer WARNER BROS.8283

No. 4 (LW 4) “MUSCRAT LOVE”

The Captain & Tennille A&M1870

No. 3 (LW 5) “YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A STAR (To Be In My Show)

Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr. ABC RECORDS12208

No. 2 (LW 2)“THE RUBBERBAND MAN”

The Spinners ATLANTIC3355

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“TONIGHT’S THE NIGHT (Gonna Be Alright)”

Rod Stewart

WARNER BROTHERS RECORDS3519

 

This was the sixth of an eventual eight weeks as the biggest hit 45 RPM in America for Rod Stewart on Warner Brothers Records with “Tonight’s The Night (Gonna Be Alright)” from the over three-million-selling LP A Night On The Town. The song was written by Stewart and featured his then gal-pal Britt Ekland, the Swedish former wife of actor Peter Sellers and Bond Girl featured in the 007 film The Man With The Golden Gun. Upon their break-up, Stewart excised her purring speaking part on the song for some future releases of the song, including on the LP Rod Stewart’s Greatest Hits in 1979.

Roderick David Stewart is one of the biggest record-sellers of all time in the U.S., Europe and Australia. His career began as a teen in 1962, but it took his collaboration with Long John Baldry and later the Jeff Beck Group to get some recognition. Then, in the early ‘70s with the group Small Faces (later Faces) plus his solo album Every Picture Tells A Story, made him a major star on both sides of the Atlantic. The LP (featuring “Tonight’s The Night (Gonna Be Alright)’ A Night On The Town was prevented from reaching the No. 1 position on the Top LPs & Tape chart by Songs In The Key Of Life from Stevie Wonder. (**See below.) The tracks for the LP were largely recorded in Muscles Shoals, Alabama, but the final vocal tracks were recorded at the Caribou Ranch Studios in Colorado.   

 

 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘76

 

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“SORRY SEEMS TO BE THE HARDEST WORD”

Elton John

MCA / ROCKET RECORDS40645

 

This single was the No. 1 tune on the Easy Listening Singles listing for just this one week for Elton John with “Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word” on MCA/Rocket Records. It replaced “After The Lovin’ from Engelburt Humperdinck at the apex. Elton’s second release on his own Rocket label came from the LP Blue Moves and was a moody minor key ballad track that reached No. 6 on the Hot 100 Singles register. None the less, “Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word” was yet another million-selling single for Elton John; his twelfth to sell a million or more up to this point in ’76 in America.   

This bleak song was collaboration between lyricist Bernie Taupin and musical composer Elton John. He had fired his usual band the year before after over five years of major hits together. In their place for “Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word” and the LP Blue Moves, Elton utilized Ray Cooper on vibraphone, Carl Fortina on the accordion track, James Newton-Howard on the electric piano (and arranger) along with Kenny Passarelli on bass guitar. A year later, the song was featured in the Paul Newman hockey film, Slap Shot.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘76

No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“DAZZ”

Brick

BANG RECORDS727


It said it right there in the grooves—“Dazz” was a blend of what they called ‘Disco-Jazz’ or better described as a blend of Disco, Funk and Jazz. Maybe they should have called the song “Disfunkazz”…no? The song came from the band Brick, with roots in Atlanta, Georgia. The members of this ensemble came from two different groups; one a Jazz band, and the other a dance-oriented crew. Their album Good High was recorded in Atlanta and featured the No. 1 record on the Hot Soul Singles list, “Dazz.” The song reached a strong No. 3 on the Hot 100 Singles Pop chart. Here’s a faster live version of “Dazz” performed on the TV show Midnight Special

The Brick LP Good High became a No. 1 album on the Top Soul LPs list and hit No. 19 on the Pop Top LPs & Tape chart. The band was fronted by vocalist and sax player Jimmy “Lord” Brown, along with Ray Ransom on vocals and bass, Donald Nevins on keyboards, Eddie Irons on drums and Regi Hargis on guitar. They used session musicians from the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra for some tracks on the album. A year later, Brick had another single in ‘77 called “Dusic”—and don’t laugh—it stands from “Disco” and “Music.” I heard you laugh. That record was a strong No. 2 Soul single, but peaked at No. 18 on the Pop singles chart. Brick all but disappeared after one final low chart entry in ’78.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

December 18, 1976


TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘76:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


SONGS IN THE KEY OF LIFE

Stevie Wonder

TAMLA RECORDS00340


Produced, arranged and composed by Stevie Wonder. That alone left little hesitation that he was at the crest of his craft by the time Songs In The Key Of Life was released in ’76; the earliest album to debut at No. 1 by an American artist. Englishman Elton John was the first. Wonder’s double-album plus EP began its prolonged ride at the peak of the Top LPs & Tape chart for an eventual 14 non-successive survey-cycles (this was the 10th week) as well as the Hot Soul LPs listing for 20 non-consecutive seven-day phases. What’s known as the ‘Classic Stevie Wonder Period’ started in 1972 with the LP Music Of My Mind. That was followed afterward in ’72 by Talking Book, Innervisions from ’73, Fullfillingness’ First Finale in ’74—and, after a long-drawn-out waiting period—Songs In The Key Of Life in ’76. He almost renounced the music business before Songs In The Key Of Life was released, as he was discontented the U.S. government; just about moving to Africa. He thought twice about it, and signed yet an added deal with Motown/Tamla. As an outcome, and after many pushed-up release dates for the album, the first 45 RPM single from the two-LP and one 33 1/3 RPM EP set was “I Wish,” an expression of joy of Stevie’s youth. The next single, “Sir Duke,” his tribute to his idols, especially the then recently departed Duke Ellington, also reached No. 1 on the Pop and Soul singles listings in 1977. Another stellar track on the set was on side-four of the double-album; the seven-minute plus song called “As.”

Stevie Wonder had turned 21 in 1971 and let his current Motown contract expire. To return, he insisted on not only a higher royalty rate, but independence to record practically everything he desired. Fearing of losing Wonder to a different company, Berry Gordy, Jr. consented. Over 100 people were involved in Songs In The Key Of Life, including a multitude of musicians. The set also incorporated “Isn’t She Lovely” a song about his infant child Aisha. “Pastime Paradise” is another notable track, largely about America’s Bi-Centennial year and those who exist in the past, with diminutive hope for the future—perhaps an expression of how he felt about the U.S. government at the time. This grand album is thought by many musicologists to be amid the greatest records released in the Rock & Roll era.

 

HOT SOUL LPS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘76

 

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

SONGS IN THE KEY OF LIFE

Stevie Wonder

MOTOWN RECORDS00340


On the Hot Soul LPs & Tape chart, Songs In The Key Of Life was in the 10th of an ultimate 20 huge weeks in the No. 1 slot on that listing. 

(**See above.)


THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

Ending

December 15, 1984


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

 

No. 5 (LW 7) “SEA OF LOVE”

The Honeydrippers ES PERANZA99701

No. 4 (LW 3) “I FEEL FOR YOU”

Chaka Khan WARNER BROTHERS 29195

No. 3 (LW 11) “LIKE A VIRGIN”

Madonna SIRE29210

No. 2 (LW 2) “WILD BOYS”

Duran Duran CAPITOL5417


No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“OUT OF TOUCH”

Daryl Hall and John Oates

RCA RECORDS13916


This was the second and final week for “Out Of Touch” from Daryl Hall and John Oates in the No. 1 slot on the Hot 100 Singles chart on RCA Records. The 45 RPM was the duo’s sixth and final chart-topping single in the U.S. The song sprang from the loins of the LP Big Bam Boom and was the set’s first single. “Out Of Touch” was their 15th consecutive Top 40 chart release dating back to 1979. John Oates said at the time they were not worried about losing their Pop following by going in a more Urban/Dance direction for “Out Of Touch.” He was correct. Here’s a remix 12-inch single version of the song to illustrate what Oates meant. 

To illustrate just how massive their careers have been, in all, up to and including 1999, they had a total of 30 Top 40 hits. Their first charting single was “She’s Gone” in 1974. The first time that single was issued by Atlantic Records, it had only reached No. 60 on the Hot 100 and was a regional hit in Philadelphia. But after they switched labels to RCA Records and had a million-selling No. 4 45 RPM with “Sara Smile,” Atlantic re-released “She’s Gone” reaching No. 7.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’84:

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)


“SEA OF LOVE”

The Honeydrippers

ES PERANZA RECORDS99701

 

This remake of the 1959 million-selling hit “Sea Of Love” originally by Phil Phillips with the Twilights, was No. 1 for this sole week on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart for the Honeydrippers on Es Peranza Records. The original was co-written by Phillips (real name John Phillip Baptiste) along with a guy named George Khoury; both Lake Charles, Louisiana natives. Actually, Khoury did what many record label owners did and gave himself credit for the song that Baptiste (Phillips) wrote alone. The production was handled by a guy named Ed Shuler and put out originally on Khoury’s own label. The song became so hot, he leased it to the much larger Mercury Records and it raced to No. 2 on the Hot 100 and was a No. 1 song on 30-song national Hot R&B Sides chart then put out by Billboard. The song was about a woman named Verdie Mae, whom the then 30 year-old Baptiste had fallen in love in 1957 while working as a bell-hop at a Lake Charles hotel. He wrote the song for her on the spot on her front porch! It’s listed on the label as being by Phil Phillips and the Twilights; but in reality it was a group called Cookie and the Cupcakes (Cookie was a male sax-player named Huey “Cookie” Thierry) with the label owner changing Baptiste’s name to what he thought was a more commercial Phil Phillips. Phillips became a radio personality in Louisiana after he failed to have another hit song. Here is the original version from ’59.

The woman never did settle down with Baptiste. So much for writing a song that millions of people heard around the world! 22 years later, singer Del Shannon also had his last charted hit with the 1981 remake of “Sea Of Love” (not a bad rendition to be honest) produced by one Tom Petty that reached No. 33 on the Hot 100. Here’s the Del Shannon version, performed on the TV show Solid Gold in early ’82 just as it was peaking on the chart.

I met Del Shannon in the mid-80s, and told him how much I loved his version. He was thankful. Then he committed suicide just a few years later in 1990. Oy. Now move up to 1984, and Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant had plans for an R&B band called the Honeydrippers. Actually, he had some other musicians performing at that group as early as 1981. But in ’84, he got a bunch of musicians together to record what became a five-song EP (Extended-Play) 45 RPM. One of the songs was “Rockin’ At Midnight” a remake of a song from 1949 originally done by Roy Brown…itself a re-write of his own 1947 record, “Good Rockin’ Tonight.” Plant thought that was the A side of a single released by Atlantic Records. In reality it was originally, but radio stations began playing (to Plant’s horror) “Sea Of Love” with its syrupy strings and all. He detested that he might be thought of as a “crooner.” The record quickly became the No. 1 song on the (more horror) Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart and climbed to No. 3 on the Hot 100. Plant later attempted to revive the Honeydrippers, but Atlantic Records’ founder Ahmet Ertegün died in 2006; thus ending any chances of that project being revived. Here’s the Honeydrippers rendition of “Sea Of Love.”

The Honeydrippers consisted of Plant’s band mate from Led Zeppelin, Jimmy Page, along with the legendary Jeff Beck and Chic’s Nile Rogers on guitars, Wayne Pedziwiatr on bass, Keith Evans on sax, Dave Weckl on drums and David Letterman’s bandleader Paul Shaffer on piano.

 


HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’84:


No.1

R&B

45 RPM/Cassette

(Last Week No. 1)


“SOLID”

Ashford & Simpson

CAPITOL RECORDS5397

After years of writing major hits for other artists, Ashford & Simpson finally had a Top 15 Pop hit themselves with this week’s No. 1 song on the Hot Black Singles chart with “Solid” on Capitol Records. Not for the lack of trying, but Nicholas Ashford and his wife Valerie Simpson had minor success as a recording act, starting in 1974 on Warner Brothers Records. They had just three Pop-charting Hot 100 singles on Warner Brothers over a five-year span. None reached higher than the No. 36 position with a song called “Found A Cure.” Switching labels, the former Motown songwriters and backup singers thought they would have better luck with Capitol Records. Initially, they were incorrect with a minor release in ’82 that stalled. But persistence is a virtue, and Ashford & Simpson finally struck pay-dirt with “Solid” from an album of the same name on Capitol. The song was No. 1 for the third and last week during this seven-day survey-phase in ’84 on the Hot Black Singles chart.


Ashford & Simpson - Solid by trashfan

“Solid” was a huge hit in the U.K. and was one of the best-selling records of ’84 over there. Ashford & Simpson were perhaps most famous for co-writing and producing music by the later day Supremes, also Diana Ross’ hit “Reach Out And Touch (Somebody’s Hand),” and “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” also an earlier hit for Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell as well as that duo’s “Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing,” “You’re All I Need To Get By” and “You’re Precious Love” in addition to “Let’s Go Get Stoned” made famous by Ray Charles and “I’m Every Woman” first a hit for Chaka Kahn then Whitney Houston. In the ‘90s, the duo of Ashford & Simpson had been radio personalities on the now gone radio station WRKS (Kiss FM) here in New York City. Nicholas Ashford passed away on August 22, 2011 due to throat cancer.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

December 15, 1984


TOP POP ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’84:

No. 1

Pop

LP/Cassette

(Last Week No. 1)


PURPLE RAIN

Music From The Motion Picture Purple Rain starring PRINCE

Prince and the Revolution

 

WARNER BROS. RECORDS25110

 

Ho-Hum. It was the 20th consecutive week for the Prince album Purple Rain to be in the No. 1 position on the Top Pop Albums chart this week in ’84. The soundtrack to the movie Purple Rain began its reign at the peak of the album chart, opening with the week ending August 4, 1984. Prince reigned with the crowning record on the Top Pop Albums chart for the rest of the year plus the first two weeks in ’85; for a total of 24 weeks when was said and done. The five singles from this LP were: “When Doves Cry,” (No. 1 Pop and an over two-million-selling single) followed by “Let’s Go Crazy” (No. 1 Pop and selling over one million copies) his second No. 1 song from the double-album on the Hot 100 after being released as a single on August 11th. Then, the title track “Purple Rain” was quickly put out a month and a half later on September 26th (eventually No. 2 Pop and also another million-selling single) hitting that height in mid-November of ’84. That title track was followed with “I Would Die 4 U” (No. 8 Pop.) “I Would Die 4 U” had the song “Another Lonely Christmas” on the B side of the single; which would reach No. 5 on that season’s Christmas Singles listing. There was yet an added single, “Take Me With U” featuring Prince and Apollonia (Kotero) in a duet (No. 25 Pop) the final single from the two LP set. The album and film are basically the life story of Prince Rogers Nelson. Purple Rain eventually won an Oscar® for Best Original Song Score (the last Academy Award® of that kind), and the album sold 20 million copies globally. There are no Prince videos available to share with you in this column. Sorry!

 


HOT BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘84

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)


PURPLE RAIN

Music from the Motion Picture Purple Rain starring PRINCE

Prince & the Revolution

Warner Bros. Records25110

  

This week in ’84 on the Hot Black Albums chart, Prince held the throne for the 14th of an eventual 19 back-to-back weeks. (**See the details above.)

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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