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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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August 22nd, 2014




THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

 August 30, 1969

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’69:

No. 5 (LW 4) “SWEET CAROLINE (Good Times Never Seemed So Good”

Neil Diamond UNI55136

No. 4 (LW 6) “PUT A LITTLE LOVE IN YOUR HEART”

Jackie DeShannon Imperial66385

No. 3 (LW 14) “SUGAR, SUGAR”  

The Archies Calendar63-1008

No. 2 (LW 2) “A BOY NAMED SUE” 

 Johnny Cash Columbia44944

No. 1

POP 45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“HONKY TONK WOMEN”

The Rolling Stones

London Records910

 

The ‘Bad-Boys of Rock ‘n Roll’ were at it again with their biggest hit in two and a half years with “Honky Tonk Women” on Decca Records worldwide, and London Records in America. The band had gone through a psychedelic period in ’67, came back strong with a No. 3 hit with “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” but “Honky Tonk Women” was their first No. 1 song in the U.S.A. since “Ruby Tuesday” hit the apex of the Hot 100 in early ’67. So, do ya gotta have more cow-bell? Well, you got it, as this week’s chart-topping single kicked-off with just that, played on the track by their producer at the time, Jimmy Miller. Here’s a live version complete with giant blow-up dolls, much to the obvious delight of Mick Jagger and Keith Richard. 


On the single, the backup singers were Raparata and the Delrons, the Brooklyn-based all-girl vocal group, Doris Troy, then newly signed to the Beatles label, Apple Records and famous for the 1963 hit “Just One Look” and with another Brooklyn native, Nanette Workman; credited as Nannette Newman. “Honky Tonk Women” started out as a sort of cowboy song, according to Keith Richards, as Keef and Jagger (and their girlfriends at the time Marianne Faithful and Anita Pallenberg) were staying at a dude ranch in Brazil. Richards says he was just doodling on his guitar and the basics of the song were made in a ‘honky-tonk’ manor. Once they got into the studio, the song morphed into a bluesy groove. The Stones did release a country-like version; calling it “Country Honk” on their 1969 album Let It Bleed. On the original version of “Honky Tonk Women,” Rolling Stones’ founder Brian Jones’ guitar tracks were erased after the Glimmer Twins fired him; with new licks filled by brand new member Mick Taylor, his first song performing with the band. Jones died in his swimming pool under mysterious circumstances on July 3, 1969, the same day the single was released in the U.K. The first appearance on an album in the U.S. for “Honky Tonk Women” was on the compilation released on September 12, 1969 called Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2) on London Records. The LP was delivered in an octagonal gatefold sleeve, featuring their singles and some B sides from 1967 through 1969, as well as some LP cuts. The inside of the album featured a tribute to Jones saying, “When this you see, remember me and bear me in your mind. Let all the world say what they may, speak of me as you find.” The album excluded the B side of the “Honky Tonk Women” single, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” which charted by itself in 1973, reaching No. 42 on the Hot 100. That song ended up on Let It Bleed

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No. 1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“A BOY NAMED SUE”

Johnny Cash

Columbia Records – 44944

The ‘Man in Black’ Johnny Cash had the biggest hit on the Easy Listening Singles chart this week in ’69 with “A Boy Named Sue” recorded live at San Quentin Prison on Columbia Records. This was the first of two back-to-back weeks at the apex of that chart, and was in its second of three weeks in the No. 2 slot on the Hot 100 Singles list. It was also a No. 1 Country hit that summer. “A Boy Named Sue” was Cash’s first Top 30 Pop hit since “Ring Of Fire” in 1963.


That performance was recorded in California at the prison on February 24, 1969, and was included on the Cash LP At San Quentin, released on June 4th of that year. “A Boy Named Sue” was written by Shel Silverstein who had just recorded the song himself, produced by Country guitar virtuoso Chet Atkins along with Felton Jarvis who handled much of the output by Elvis Presley from ’66 until his death. It’s been said that long-time New York radio personality Jean Shepherd (A Christmas Story from 1983) inspired his friend Silverstein to write the song “A Boy Named Sue” based on the taunting Jean received as a kid due to his name being considered feminine. “A Boy Named Sue” was the biggest chart hit single for John R. “Johnny” Cash who died in 2003. Silverstein passed away in 1999. Your Big Jay has met Johnny’s younger brother Tommy Cash while he was a guest on All Night with Joey Reynolds in Times Square, where I was sidekick/announcer. Tommy is also a fine interpretive country singer.

 

BEST SELLING

SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘69

No. 1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“SHARE YOUR LOVE WITH ME”

 

Aretha Franklin

Atlantic Records2650

 

The Queen of Soul was on a roll with yet another No. 1 song on the newly re-named Best Selling Soul Singles chart; the second of five ultimate weeks in that position. This R&B chart’s moniker changed frequently through the years. At the peak of the list was “Share Your Love With Me” on Atlantic Records, in the second of five ultimate weeks in that position. The 45 RPM would reach No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. This was actually a remake for Sister Soul. “Share Your Love With Me” was initially recorded by Bobby Blue Bland on Duke Records back in 1963 and included on his ’64 album Call On Me.


The song was written by Al “TNT” Braggs (an opening act for Bobby Bland) and Deadric Malone, one of dozens of aliases for Don D. Robey the owner of Peacock and Duke Records. He reportedly put his name on the writing credits to scam money from many of his artists. That was a fairly common practice in the Rhythm & Blues recording field in the ‘50s into the ‘60s. According to people like songwriter Jerry Lieber (Lieber & Stoller) Robey was a gangster who used violence and intimidation and murder—stealing the copyright for songs they wrote like “Hound Dog” for Big Mama Thornton. After Elvis Presley recorded that song, the song’s true writers fought for years to get proper credit much to the chagrin of Robey who had to eventually pay them royally. Aretha’s “Share Your Love With Me” was taken from the Queen’s LP This Girl’s In Love With You, that featured the singles: “The Weight” (No. 19 Pop from 1969) with Duane Allman on slide guitar, a remake of the song from the Band, another remake with the Lennon/McCartney song “Elenore Rigby” (No. 17 Pop) and “Call Me,” the album’s only Franklin original song (No. 13 Pop) backed with “Son Of A Preacher Man” as the charted B side. An album track from Aretha’s album, the Lennon/McCartney song “Let It Be” was released even before the Beatles single version came out on March 6, 1970. Their LP—the soundtrack for Let It Be—wasn’t released until May 8, 1970. Aretha’s version was on the loose for its debut on HER album on January 15, 1970. Lady Soul did it first for public consumption. That’s a pretty good trivia question and answer. Yes, you may use it Record Pigs.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 30, 1969

TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘69:

No. 1

POP LP

AT SAN QUINTEN

Johnny Cash  

Columbia Records5362

This was the second of four consecutive weeks as the biggest album in America for Johnny Cash with At San Quentin, on Columbia Records. The song was No. 2 on the Hot 100 this week, No. 1 on the Easy Listening Singles chart and No. 1 on the Country Singles chart as well. On the Country LPs chart, it was No. 1 in the fifth of 20 survey-periods.


The original LP was actually a shorter version of the entire live show, but has been released several times with different running-orders through the years. There is a CD version which claims to be the full concert, but there are cuts, and reportedly features some addition audio not heard on any other release. Some reviewers say the original LP was the greatest album Cash ever released. If you like Johnny Cash, here’s the original LP in its entirety.

 

BEST SELLING

SOUL

LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’69:

No. 1

SOUL LP

(Last Week No. 1)

HOT BUTTERED SOUL

Isaac Hayes

Enterprise/Stax Records 1001

How about an album with just four songs on it? That’s what you got with Hot Buttered Soul from Isaac Hayes; the No. 1 album on the Best Selling Soul LPs chart for the second of 10 consecutive weeks on the Stax Records subsidiary label, Enterprise. This album went on to sell over three million copies and was the beginning of keeping Stax alive for another few years after they lost affiliation with Atlantic Records. Two of the songs were the A and B sides of a seriously edited single. Both were from other songwriters. The A side was “Walk On By” (12:03 on the LP) the Burt Bacharach and Hal David song made famous by Dionne Warwick, and the B side was an interpretation of “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” (18:40 on the album) made popular by Glen Campbell and written by Jimmy Webb. Here’s the single edit of the long version of “Walk On By” from Hot Buttered Soul.


Now here’s the B side, the entire un-edited “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” featuring Hayes doing what seemed like an ad-libbed slow rap. 


The surviving members of the Bar-Kays (the rest of the band died along with Otis Redding in ’67) performed with Hayes on this album. Hot Buttered Soul was far more successful than his first full album for Stax (Enterprise) Records Presenting Isaac Hayes. In 1968, when Stax got estranged from Atlantic Records, the company from Memphis released a ton of old and new product (in hopes of staying alive) simultaneously unleashed by orders from Al Bell the company leader. He told every artist on the roster to come up with new material. When Hayes’ 1968 improvised LP Presenting Isaac Hayes flopped  (performed by the future ‘Black Moses’ along with just drummer Al Jackson, ‘the human metronome’ and bassist Donald “Duck” Dunn both from Booker T & the M.G.’s) it led to the highly successful Hot Buttered Soul; largely because Hayes told Art Bell that he wanted total creative control this time. Isaac’s gamble paid off, as Hot Buttered Soul became one of the biggest albums of the year 1969. Hayes died of a stroke near Memphis on August 10, 2008.

 

 

THE

BIG
 SINGLES 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 30, 1975

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

No. 5 (LW 7)“HOW SWEET IT IS (To Be Loved By You)”

James Taylor Warner Bros.8109

No. 4 (LW 2)“ONE OF THESE NIGHTS”

Eagles Asylum45257

No. 3 (LW 5)“RHINESTONE COWBOY”

Glen Campbell Capitol4095

No. 2 (LW 1)“FALLIN’ IN LOVE”

Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds Playboy6024

No. 1

POP 45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

 

“GET DOWN TONIGHT”

KC and the Sunshine Band

TK Records1009

 

If you’re reading this before the CBS-FM ‘Concert In The Park’ on Long Island, enjoy the KC & the Sunshine Band free show. If you’re reading this afterward, I hope you enjoyed the show. This week in ’75, “Get Down Tonight” was the No. 1 45 RPM in the land by the Hialeah, Florida outfit. The single was only in that pinnacle position for one week on the Pop side. It had been the chart-topping record on the Hot Soul Singles chart last week for one survey-period; but it was strong enough to be named the No. 3 Soul hit of the year. “Get Down Tonight” was a North American smash, as the record took the top-spot on Canada’s singles chart as well. Here’s an early TV recording of the song from 1975. The audio isn’t the best, but you can see the excitement of the large act at the beginning of their run of five No. 1 songs on the Pop charts.


Reportedly, the song was inspired by the title “Get Down” by Gilbert O’Sullivan’s 1973 hit according to the record’s co-writer Richard Finch. Little did he know THAT song was about a DOG. But Finch and Harry Wayne Casey put the clearly funky track together after experimenting with an earlier album of similar-sounding songs. Your Big Jay played tracks from that album called Do It Good in the clubs at the Jersey Shore in ’74 before this music was tagged as ‘Disco’ and got great response; especially with the songs “Sound Your Funky Horn” and “Queen Of Clubs.” That album featured the background vocals of George McCrae who had a monster hit of his own called “Rock Your Baby.” His then wife Gwen also enjoyed a Top 10 hit called “Rocking Chair.” So when I was on vacation in Miami Beach in the spring of ’75, I heard “Get Down Tonight” on the R&B AM stations there while on the sand with my trusty Sears transistor radio. I turned to my fiancé (yeah we got married) and said, “That’s going to be a No. 1 song.” I was correct, as always. The album was simply titled KC and the Sunshine Band and featured three female vocalists this time, along with some of Miami’s finest musicians. This LP also featured the next single, the No. 1 song “That’s The Way (I Like It) and the future hit used on the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, “Boogie Shoes.” A follow-up album called The Sound Of Sunshine didn’t do as well, as it was a rushed instrumental-only LP and featured a flop single called “Shotgun Shuffle.” That album was listed as only The Sunshine Band. The act recovered quickly with a fourth album oddly called Part 3. But it had two No. 1 songs and another reaching No. 2.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART THIS WEEK IN ‘75

 

No. 1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“FALLIN’ IN LOVE”

Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds

Playboy Records – 6024

Actually, by the time “Fallin’ In Love” was this week’s No. 1 song on the Easy Listening Singles chart (and had been No. 1 on the Hot 100 a week ago in ’75) the name of the group should have read, Hamilton, Joe Frank and Dennison. Reynolds had left the trio. So who were these guys? Hamilton was Dan Hamilton (who wrote “Fallin’ In Love” with his wife Ann) Joe Frank was Joseph Frank Carollo and Reynolds was Tommy Reynolds. He left and Alan Dennison was his replacement. Their first hit was “Don’t Pull Your Love” (No. 4 Pop) with some decent follow-up singles: “Annabella” (No. 46) which sounded a lot like “Don’t Pull Your Love” and “Daisy May” (No. 41) all on Dunhill/ABC Records. Their contract wasn’t renewed and the group searched for another label. The upstart Playboy Records was looking to fill their roster, and the group was signed; but they were told they had to use the moniker Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds despite Tommy being gone and Alan Dennison being the third wheel. They struck pay-dirt right out of the box with Playboy Records and here was the resulting No. 1 record.

Unfortunately, the new trio had just one more record in the Top 40 (not a bad one) called “Winners And Losers” sounding, of course, similar to “Fallin’ In Love.” Their last two singles from their second album for Playboy Records were listed as Hamilton, Joe Frank and Dennison after they convinced the label it was the right thing to do. “Fallin’ In Love” was the record label’s only No. 1 hit. Playboy Records also signed the Hudson Brothers, Country singer Mickey Gilley. And who could forget Barbi Benton, Playboy bunny and magazine cover-girl and regular Hee-Haw TV cast member, guest star on Fantasy Island and The Love Boat who had a Country hit (No. 5) called “Brass Buckles. The independent Playboy Records ended up being absorbed by Epic Records after Hugh Hefner lost interest in running what could have been a robust record label (snicker) and its name was drooping by 1978. Playboy’s ‘70s master recordings are now owned by Sony Music under their Legacy Recordings label.  

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘75

No. 1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“YOUR LOVE”

Graham Central Station

Warner Bros. Records8105

Larry Graham was the bass player and bass singer for the multi-racial (with a female horn player) Sly & the Family Stone from their inception in ‘66 to ‘72. You know his voice from “Dance To The Music” when he proclaims, “I’m gonna add some bottom.” Larry’s new band, Graham Central Station, had the No. 1 Hot Soul Single this week in ’75. It was in that slot for merely one survey-period. “Your Love” didn’t fare nearly as well on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart, landing at No. 38.

Larry started his new group after he joined a band he was producing on stage for their finale one night in a club. The crowd went wild and he decided to join the ensemble himself, continuing to produce them. Oh, and he changed their name from Hot Chocolate (not the group that did “You Sexy Thing”) to Graham Central Station. Larry is legendary for his use of the ‘slap-bass’ sound he perfected on his electric bass guitar as a defacto sound of Funk music that was also hugely influential in later Disco/Dance music as well. He stumbled upon that technique when he was performing in lounges with his entertainer mom Dell Graham on piano and Larry on bass guitar as a duo when he was a teen. There was no drummer, so to compensate; he’d thump the strings with his thumb to give the illusion of having a snare drum for the backbeat while continuing to play bass patterns. It ain’t as easy as you’d think. The 45 RPM of “Your Love” was featured on an LP called Ain’t No ‘Bout-A-Doubt It, their third album for Warner Bros. Records. Graham would dismantle Graham Central Station after seven LPs for Warner Bros., and go for a solo career on the label as a singer. His first foray into solo-ville was a million-selling single ballad called “One In A Million” (No. 9 Pop) and also reached No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles listing in the summer of 1980 from the LP One And A Million You. He had other solo hits, including: “When We Get Married” and “Just Be My Lady.” Larry re-formed Graham Central Station in the early ‘90s and they opened for Prince during his successful 2011 concert tour. Funk Lives.

 

THE

BIG
 ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 30, 1975

TOP LPS & TAPE CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

No. 1

POP

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC AND THE BROWN DIRT COWBOOY

Elton John

MCA Records1613

This was the very earliest album to ever debut in the No. 1 position on the Top LPs & Tape Chart in history. Elton John did it with his ninth studio album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy on MCA Records. This LP was a concept record from the beginning, with Elton being Captain Fantastic, and his lyricist collaborator Bernie Taupin representing the Brown Dirt Cowboy. All of the musical compositions were written by Elton while on a ship from the ‘mother country’ to America. Reginald Kenneth “Hercules” Dwight claims it was his finest album, as he claimed it wasn’t as marketable as many of his other works. He explains more in this video.

“Someone Saved My Life Tonight” was the only single chosen from the album and attained the No. 4 setting on the Hot 100 Singles chart. The tune was auto-biographical, according to Sir Elton, telling the story of his engagement to a female and his attempted suicide in ‘69. The single managed to sell over a million copies. English Pop Artiste Alan Aldridge designed the intricate cover of the LP in this, the last week of an ultimate seven non-consecutive survey-periods at No. 1. After week-six, the album One Of These Nights by Eagles took over at No. 1 for five uninterrupted weeks, then Capt. Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboys returned for another triumphant weekly cycle this week in ’75; making way for Red Octopus by Jefferson Starship the following survey-phase.

 

HOT SOUL ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘75

No. 1

SOUL

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

 

WHY CAN’T WE BE FRIENDS

War

United Artists RecordsLA 441 G

The title track from the album by War, Why Can’t We Be Friends, became a million-selling single during the summer of ’75 on United Artists Records; reaching No. 6 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and No. 9 on the Hot Soul Singles listing. The LP itself reached a respectable No. 8 on the Pop Top LPs & Tape chart and No. 1 on the Hot Soul LPs register. But it was the song “Low Rider” that is perhaps War’s most beloved record.

“Low Rider” was released right around this week in ’75, ready to begin its run up the charts. It entered the Hot 100 for the week ending on September 20, 1975 and reached No. 7 on the Pop side. Its bigger influence was attaining the coveted No. 1 position on the Hot Soul Singles chart for the week ending on November 8th of that year for a sole week. The ‘Americana’ tune was dreamed up during a jam session with the band in a San Francisco studio by War’s sax player Charles Miller. Suddenly, Miller started saying the words, “Low ri-der drives a little slower.” Next, Lee Oskar, the band’s Danish-born harmonica player jumped in with the now iconic hum-along melody; and, as they say, the rest was history. The song has been used in several movies and was featured as the opening theme to TV’s The George Lopez Show. Charles Miller was murdered in 1980. War started out being called Night Shift. They were asked by one-time Animals lead singer Eric Burdon to become his funk-fusion backing band. The result was the stunning talking/singing single, “Spill The Wine” in 1970. A second LP was recorded, but Burdon left the band in mid-tour in Europe over some disagreement with the group. War went on without him. Their fifth album called The World Is A Ghetto was named the biggest selling album of the year in ’73; making it one of the principal LPs of the entire decade. Most of the songs written by the band were credited as being composed by all of the members.


THE

BIG
 SINGLES

For the Chart-Week Ending

August 28, 1982

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

No. 5 (LW 5)“HARD TO SAY I’M SORRY”

Chicago Full Moon29979

No. 4 (LW 4)“HOLD ME”

Fleetwood Mac Warner Bros.29966

No. 3 (LW 3)“ABRACADARA”

The Steve Miller Band Capitol5126

No. 2 (LW 2)“HURTS SO GOOD”

John Cougar Riva209

No. 1

POP

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“EYE OF THE TIGER”

Survivor

Scotti Brothers Records02912

This was the final week of six-straight survey-periods as the biggest single in America for the band Survivor, with the theme from the film Rocky III, “Eye Of The Tiger.” Sylvester Stallone personally asked the group to come up with the song for the upcoming movie, as he wasn’t able to obtain the rights to the Queen tune, “Another One Bites The Dust.” If you go by the Guinness Book of World Records, “Eye Of The Tiger” is the 33rd biggest-selling record of all time; combining physical sales (vinyl-cassette/CD) with digital downloads—over nine million copies altogether. 

Of course, “Eye Of The Tiger” has a long way to go to becoming the biggest seller of ALL TIME. That tip-of-the-hat goes to “White Christmas” by Bing Crosby, with over 50 million copies sold worldwide. So you know, the biggest-selling Rock & Roll song is “(We’re Gonna) Rock Around The Clock” by Bill Haley & His Comets at over 25 million. And now, back to Survivor. The band was born in Chicago with one-time Ides Of March founder and lead-singer (of “Vehicle” fame...ya know, “I’m your vehicle baby, I’ll take you anywhere you want to go”) Jim Peterik joining Survivor. The band’s second LP called Premonition had a song on it called “Poor Man’s Son.” That’s the record that got the attention of Stallone, who wanted something that had that same feel. He got it with “Eye Of The Tiger.” The tune featured Dave Bickler on lead vocals, along with Peterick on backing vocals, guitars and keyboards, with Jim’s co-writer Frankie Sullivan on lead guitar and backing vocals, Marc Droubay on drums and Stephen Ellis on bass guitar. Both songwriters Peterick and Sullivan also arranged and produced the track and all of the songs on their attached LP, except one song that Jim wrote himself. The follow-up had the impossible task of topping “Eye Of The Tiger,” with “American Heartbeat” stalling at No. 17 on the Hot 100. But, Survivor became survivors, as they continued to have big hits including: 1984’s “I Can’t Hold Back” (No. 13 Pop) 1985’s “High On You” (No. 8 Pop), ‘85’s “The Search Is Over” (No. 4 Pop and No. 1 Adult Contemporary Tracks) “86’s “Burning Heart” (from Stallone’s film Rocky IV—No. 2 Pop) and from ’86, (No. 9 Pop) “Is This Love.” Survivor called it quits for the first time in ’89. They’ve had various reunions since then with fluctuating members. Currently, Sullivan, Bickler, and Jimi Jamison (who replaced Bickler and sang lead on “Burning Heart”) are calling themselves Survivor. Peterik, Droubay and Ellis are no longer associated with the group.   

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY TRACKS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’82:

 

No. 1

Adult Contemporary

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)  

“HARD TO SAY I’M SORRY”

Chicago

Full Moon Records – 29979

It took just shy of six years, but Chicago finally hit the top of the Hot 100 Singles chart again, (in a couple of weeks) plus was No. 1 for the second of an eventual three consecutive weeks on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks list during this survey-period with “Hard To Say I’m Sorry.” In fact, this was the band’s first Top 50 Pop hit since “No Tell Lover” from their album Hot Streets in 1978. Chicago had been cast aside by Columbia Records in 1981, believing they were no longer relevant after selling multiple millions of records. They proved them wrong as they signed with Full Moon Records, distributed by Warner Bros. Records. Full Moon had originally been affiliated with Epic/CBS Records. “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” came from Chicago 16, released in May of ‘82, and was featured in the film Summer Lovers, starring Daryl Hannah, Peter Gallagher and Valerie Quennessen. “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” was connected with another short song called “Get Away” on the LP. Here’s a live version of the two linked pieces of music. Ya gotta love the Chicago horn section and the incredible as always, drummer Danny Seraphine.

Here’s where it gets a little crowded. Peter Cetera and producer, songwriter and pianist David Foster co-wrote those two songs. In addition to the six other members of Chicago, three guys from Toto also performed on this track, including: David Paich and Steve Porcaro on synthesizers, along with guitar virtuoso Steve Lukather. Chicago 16 led the band to its best-selling album ever with their next release, Chicago 17. That would be the LAST Chicago album with Peter Cetera. There are conflicting stories about whether he was booted or left on his own for his budding solo career. Founding drummer Seraphine was kicked-out of the band in 1990. He’s got his OWN act these days called California Transit Authority, or CTA—a play on the original name of his former band—Chicago Transit Authority. Your Biggest Jay has seen Chicago dozens of times through the years, beginning when they were the opening act for (gulp) Iron Butterfly in 1969! And, just sayin’…whoever stole my SIGNED Chicago Transit Authority album may return it to me ASAP, no questions asked.  

 

BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’82:

No. 1

Hot Black

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“DANCE FLOOR (Part 1)”

Zapp

Warner Bros. Records29961

For the second straight and final week, the ‘Electro-Funk’ group Zapp had the No. 1 Black Singles chart-leader with the song “Dance Floor (Part 1)” on Warner Bros. Records. There was tragedy in the future for the two brothers who wrote this infectious song. Read more about that below. This recording “Dance Floor (Part 1)” never reached the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart, when other songs from the group AND leader Roger (Troutman) did.

Zapp came from Hamilton, Ohio, not far from Cincinnati. From the start, the band members were all brothers: Roger, Larry, Lester and Terry Troutman along with non-family members Gregory Jackson and Bobby Glover. Recording on the Warner Bros. Records label, their brand of funk included a ‘talk-box’ that gave the vocals a surreal sound. The first eponymous Zapp album included their first hit called “More Bounce To The Ounce” with some production help from the funk-master George Clinton of Parliament/Funkadelic-fame. A falling out with Clinton led their second album to be produced by Roger alone. This week’s No. 1 Black Singles leader “Dance Floor (Part 1)” was from their second release Zapp II. Roger had a big Pop and Black chart hit late ’87 into early ’88 called “I Want To Be Your Man” which went to No. 3 on the Pop list and No. 1 on the newly named Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. Roger went on to collaborate with several musicians during the ‘80s into the ‘90s, including: Scritti Polliti, 2 Pac (with Dr. Dre), Johnny Gill, Nu Flavor and Nastyboy Klick. All of this music ended when Roger was shot to death by his brother Larry in what was called a murder-suicide on April 25, 1999. Roger was 47 and Larry was 54 at the time. 

  

 

THE

BIG
 ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 28, 1982

TOP LPS & TAPE CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

No. 1

POP

LP & TAPE

(Last Week No. 1)

MIRAGE

Fleetwood Mac

Warner Bros. Records11121

Currently holding down the No. 4 position this week in ’82 on the Hot 100 Singles chart with the song “Hold On,” Fleetwood Mac was enjoying the No. 1 LP & Tape in the U.S. with Mirage on Warner Bros. Records. This was the fourth of what would be a five-week run at the crest of this listing. The group had been laying-low for almost a year and a half after their successful Tusk Tour when they came together again to record this album; recorded in the same studio that Elton John used frequently, the Château d'Hérouville in France. The first single “Hold Me” got stuck in the No. 4 position on the Hot 100 for seven straight weeks with a log-jam of monster hits near or at the top. As big as the song was, it was not certified as a million-selling single. Lead vocals were from Christine McVie with Lindsay Buckingham.

Was Stevie Nicks just a mirage? You decide. Oddly the single “Hold Me” failed to even reach the singles charts in the U.K. Just as during the recording of their biggest LP Rumours, there was tension during the recording of Mirage and especially during the filming of the video for “Hold Me.” The next single from the album was Nicks’ “Gypsy” which later landed in the No. 12 spot on the Hot 100. This was followed by “Love In Store”, reaching No. 22. There was a fourth single that didn’t even make the Hot 100 in America, but oddly WAS a decent sized hit in Great Britain called “Oh Diane,” written and sung by Lindsay Buckingham. A fifth single from Mirage called “Can’t Go Back” also by Buckingham failed to chart in America or the U.K. The Nicks track “Straight Back” did well on Rock radio in ’82 without being released as a single. By some standards, Mirage was a failure for Fleetwood Mac. It DID sell over two-million copies in the U.S. and was a hit in Canada and Australia along with finally scoring in the U.K.; but nothing could compare to the multi-million-selling success of their other No. 1 LP Rumours.   

 

HOT BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘82

No. 1

Hot Black

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

GAP BAND IV

The Gap Band

Total Experience Records3001

This was actually the fifth album from the Gap Band, but they called it their fourth. What? Gap Band IV was on Total Experience Records, affiliated at the time with Mercury/Polygram Records. The album was in the last of a solid nine back-to-back weeks as the principal record on the Hot Black Albums chart. It got as high as No. 14 on the Top LPs & Tape chart. The first single from this album was “Early In The Morning” which climbed to the peak position on the Hot Black Singles chart for one term, for the week ending on June 26, 1982. The next single, “You Dropped A Bomb On Me,” first made the Pop Hot 100 for the week ending on August 14th, and was making its steady climb up to No. 31 on that survey. But “You Dropped A Bomb On Me” reached a strong No. 2 on the Hot Black Singles chart and also charted on the Dance Tracks listing, peaking at No. 39.  

The Gap Band’s use of ‘Electro-Funk’ served them well. The song “You Dropped A Bomb On Me” was co-written by producer Lonnie Simmons, with Charlie Wilson (Uncle Charlie) the lead vocalist of the Gap Band and Rudy Taylor. Brothers Charlie, Robert and Ronnie made up this ensemble, with Charlie moving on to a hugely successful solo career. He was nicknamed ‘Uncle Charlie’ by Snoop Dog and has collaborated with many big name R&B artists since his time with the Gap Band.  



(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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