Tuesday, February 21, 2017 Page Options

BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

   Minimize




August 15th, 2014




THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

 August 22, 1964

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ’64:

No. 5 (LW 10) “THE HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN”

The Animals MGMK13264

No. 4 (LW 5) “UNDER THE BOARDWALK”

The Drifters Atlantic2237

No. 3 (LW 3) “A HARD DAY’S NIGHT”  

The Beatles Capitol5222

No. 2 (LW 1) “EVERYBODY LOVES SOMEBODY” 

 Dean Martin Reprise0281

No. 1

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“WHERE DID OUR LOVE GO”

The Supremes

Motown Records1060

 It must have hurt badly for other Motown artists to call these girls the “No-Hit Supremes” before 1964. But after recording initially for the small LuPine label, then signed by Berry Gordy, Jr. for Tamla (the original Motown label) with zero results, Diane Ross, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson finally got a bit of a break with a song called “Your Heart Belongs To Me” after being switched to the fairly new Motown label. The vocal group was, by then, narrowed down to a trio, after member Betty McGlown, and then her replacement Barbara Martin left the Primettes—which was their original name—and Diane became known as Diana. McGlown died in 2008. As the Supremes, the girls had a couple more minor Pop chart hits, but finally struck pay-dirt with a song called “When The Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes.” That song reached a healthy No. 23 in early 1964, written by Holland-Dozier-Holland. That trio would have a profound effect on the female trio of singers in just six months. In ’64, this week’s No. 1 song on the Hot 100 singles chart was the simple song, “Where Did Our Love Go.” Here’s an early TV appearance to support the song.



At first, the Supremes didn’t like the song or the way they recorded it, and they were upset that H-D-H had offered it first to the Marvelettes, who had promptly turned it down. Feeling rejected yet again after having a Top 25 national hit, the Supremes were on tour with the Dick Clark Caravan of Stars. They didn’t even get mentioned on the bill. But “Where Did Our Love Go” (little to their knowledge) was rapidly becoming a hit nationwide, and the audiences began reacting louder at each new venue. Near the end of this package-tour, the Supremes went from no-billing to headliners within one month. “Where Did Our Love Go” was the first of their five straight No. 1 Hot 100 hits, and also the first of 12 eventual Pop chart-toppers for the act, which, by 1967 would be known as Diana Ross & the Supremes. 20 of their chart hits were written by Eddie Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland. When those writers/producers left Motown in 1967 over creative and monetary issues, the Supremes and other Motown acts were very concerned. Some continued to have hits with other writers/producers, but others didn’t fare as well. The Supremes were able to hang on with fresh perspectives, as Berry Gordy made it known that his main franchise was going to continue to have hits—or else. And they did. Florence Ballard passed away in February, 1976.   

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“EVERYBODY LOVES SOMEBODY”

Dean Martin

Reprise Records – 0281

 

This was the fourth of an eventual eight consecutive weeks in the pinnacle position of the Easy Listening Singles chart for “Everybody Loves Somebody” by Dean Martin. It became the Easy Listening Singles chart-leader beginning with the week-ending on August 1st of ’64. The HIT version is heard below.


According to a published account, Martin told his Beatles-loving son Dean Paul Martin, “I will knock your pallies off the charts.” He meant those pesky rock & rollers. The rest is history, as last week in ’64, the then 47 year-old ‘King of Cool’ pushed “A Hard Day’s Night” by the Fab-Four out of the No. 1 slot on the Hot 100 Singles chart after their two-week run. “Everybody Loves Somebody” was only at the summit on that listing for a sole week (replaced by the Supremes with “Where Did Our Love Go,” (see above) but it proved ole Dino still had what it takes to be have a recording career-extending hit. The Rat-Pack/The Clan/The Summit suave guy had his first hit in almost six years (the last Top-20 hit was “Volare” in 1958) with “Everybody Loves Somebody” by Dean Martin on his buddy Frank Sinatra’s (by then owned by Warner Brothers) Reprise Records. Martin (Dino Paul Crocetti) had already recorded the song way back in 1948, but also wasn’t a hit by any one of the dozen or so major stars who put it on tape. Here’s a version that Dean sang on the radio on the Bob Hope Show in ’48.


Flash forward to 1964. Martin wanted to record some of the ‘lounge’ music he sang after hours in Vegas following his headlining shows in the big room. His producer, Jimmy Bowen (who had his own hit song career with “I’m Stickin’ With You,” and “Party Doll”) needed just one more track to fill out an LP of those ‘lounge’ tunes. Martin’s pianist/ conductor and the song’s co-writer Ken Lane (who would be the only person to co-star with Martin during all nine-years on TV’s The Dean Martin Show) suggested Dino re-record “Everybody Loves Somebody” in a Jazz-style with a four-piece combo for that album called Dreams With Dean by the Intimate Dean Martin. He must have liked it, as Martin’s producer rush-recorded yet another version; this time with a full orchestra along with arranger Ernie Freeman. It was that version reaching No. 1 last week on the Hot 100, and still on top of the Easy Listening Singles chart. Initially, the ‘hit’ version got little or no response that third time around, with Reprise almost giving up on the 45 RPM release. But the label began getting reports that the song was getting radio air-play in some markets across the country, and soon, Dino had his new signature song. That track was later included on the LP titled Everybody Loves Somebody -The Hit Version on Reprise.

 

**Note: There were NO Hot R&B Singles charts published by Billboard between 11/30/63 & 1/23/65. Instead, I’m using the Cashbox R&B Singles listing.

 

CASHBOX R&B SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“UNDER THE BOARDWALK”

The Drifters

Atlantic Records – 2237

This was the second of three non consecutive weeks in the No. 1 position on the Cashbox R&B Singles list for the New York-based vocal-group the Drifters” on the Atlantic label. There was tragedy surrounding the recording of this perennial favorite about the joys of summer. The guy who had taken over as lead singer of the Drifters after Ben E. King left the group, Rudy Lewis, died suddenly, and was found the very morning that he was supposed to record this new song, “Under The Boardwalk.” Lewis is said to have died from either a heart-attack or from a drug overdose. Regardless, long-time Drifters member Johnny Moore was selected by producer Jerry Wexler to sing the song that day, as the studio time had been booked. Reluctantly, the Drifters did their best to get a few good takes. Obviously, they did. The mono 45 RPM version is different than the stereo LP track, with some minor lyrical changes. The line, “We’ll be makin’ love” only showed up on the stereo mix, as the single used, “We’ll be fallin’ in love” instead. Here’s a British TV appearance with the “Makin’ love” lyric.


The song was co-written by Brill Building mainstays Artie Resnick (born in New York) and Kenny Young (raised on the Lower East Side of Manhattan) both future members of the Songwriters Hall of Fame, mainly due to “Under The Boardwalk.” It was Jerry Wexler who discovered the song and brought it to the attention of the Drifters new producer Bert Berns. He had taken the reins of the Drifters recordings after Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller were busy with other artists at the time. Resnick was also a co-writer of the song “Good Lovin’” made first by the Olympics, but later the mega-hit for the Young Rascals.

 

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS


For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 22, 1964

TOP LPs

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:

No. 1

A HARD DAY’S NIGHT

The Beatles  

United Artists Records3366

This was the fifth of an ultimate 14 back-to-back weeks in the pinnacle position of the Top LPs chart for the soundtrack album from the Beatles called A Hard Day’s Night on United Artists Records. UA had the rights to the film, and thus, the official soundtrack recording. This LP should not be confused with the British version, which did not have instrumental versions of Beatles songs on it, conducted by their producer, George Martin with studio hired-hands. That U.K. LP contained 13 cuts of Beatles recordings. The U.S. soundtrack only had the seven tunes from the movie, plus one other track, “I’ll Cry Instead” which had been excised from the final print. Oddly, the title track didn’t appear officially in stereo in America until the Beatles LP Reel Music was released in 1982. Here’s a very fab live concert version in mono, complete with typical John Lennon impertinence and perhaps indifference, and a quite hoarse Paul McCartney.

The song had been originally recorded on April 16, 1964 at the EMI Studios at Abbey Road during a three-hour session and done in just nine takes. The title likely came from John Lennon from his book In His Own Write, but is largely credited to Richard Starkey (Ringo Starr) who used the phrase after a long day of shooting for the film A Hard Day’s Night. Having finally come up with the title for the upcoming flick, Lennon/McCartney crafted the song very quickly to satisfy the voracious record company and the even larger Beatlemania that had quickly raced across the globe. George Martin, along with “Normal” Norman (as John Lennon called Norman Smith a/k/a “Hurricane Smith” the mixing engineer) put the pieces of both the U.S. version and the British edition of the LP together while the Mop Tops were on tour in Hong Kong.

 

**Note: There were NO Hot R&B LPs charts published by Billboard between 11/30/63 & 1/23/65. In addition, Cashbox magazine did not have an R&B LPs listing at this time.



THE

BIG
 SINGLES 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 20, 1976

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘77:

No. 5 (LW 7)“EASY”

The Commodores Motown1418

No. 4 (LW 2)“I’M IN YOU”

Peter Frampton A&M1941

No. 3 (LW 4)“(Your Love Has Lifted Me) HIGHER AND HIGHER”

Rita Coolidge A&M1922

No. 2 (LW 1)“I JUST WANT TO BE YOUR EVERYTHING”

Andy Gibb RSO872

No. 1

(Last Week No. 3)

 

 

“BEST OF MY LOVE”

The Emotions

Columbia Records10544



While it wasn’t the biggest hit of 1977, the Emotions came pretty close. With five weeks in the No. 1 position on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles chart, “Best Of My Love” was the second biggest based on those criteria by the trio of sisters, who got their start singing in church in Chicago. Wanda, Sheila and Pam Hutchinson rode the wave of the popularity of Earth, Wind & Fire, whose leader Maurice White and Al McKay wrote “Best Of My Love.” White’s Kalimba Productions was credited with this piece of music shortly after they were signed by Columbia Records. This was the first of five non-consecutive weeks as the biggest hit in America. Below are the former Gospel singers on Midnight Special in 1977. Oh…and so you know, the biggest hit of the year (in fact the entire decade) was Debbie Boone’s “You Light Up My Life.”



The Emotions were brought to the attention of the Staple Singers, who suggested to the suits at their label at the time (Stax/Volt Records in Memphis) to sign them. They had some success in the Capitol of the Mid-South at Soulsville, U.S.A. on Volt Records with songs like: “So I Can Love You” (No. 39 Pop) and “Put A Little Love Away”—a song later used by the PSFS Bank in Philadelphia as their commercial theme song—a darn good tune if you ask me. I bought the single; even though it only reached No. 73 on the national Pop Hot 100 Singles chart in ‘74. Once the Stax Empire lost their way and ended up bankrupt by ’75, the Emotions were label-less; until Columbia came-a-calling. Please indulge me with that song’s inclusion in this week’s feature. It’s a Big Jay fave. Let me know what YOU think about it. A “Shoulda-been” hit for sure. Write me at BigJay@BigJaySorensen.com and tell me what you think about this really wonderful song. Unless you listened to Philadelphia AM stations in 1974, you likely never have heard this song written by phenomenal songwriters/producers Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter. Listen here.



The song was first recorded in ‘72 by Four Tops when Lambert & Potter was producing them after their defection from Motown. This song should have become a hit by somebody! Here’s Levi Stubbs and the Tops version complete with electric sitar!! Sorry…I just love the song.




 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART
THIS WEEK IN ‘77

 

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“MY HEART BELONGS TO ME”

Barbra Streisand

Columbia Records – 10555

A No. 4 hit on the Hot 100 Singles chart, “My Heart Belongs To Me” was this week’s Easy Listening Singles chart for Barbra Streisand on Columbia Records. The tune was first recorded by Alan Gordon, best known as the co-writer of “Happy Together” and “She’d Rather Be With Me,” both made famous by the Turtles. Barbra Streisand had recorded the song, hoping for “My Heart Belongs To Me” to be included in her film co-starring Robert Redford; A Star Is Born. It wasn’t used for that project, but was included in her next LP called Streisand Superman.


Former Four Lovers member and brief 4 Seasons singer/bass player/arranger Charlie Calello co-produced Streisand’s recording with Gary Klein. Calello replaced 4 Seasons co-founder Nick Massi (famously depicted in the Broadway play and film Jersey Boys) a fellow Newark, NJ native, who was then replaced by long-time member Joe Long. “My Heart Belongs To Me” was the only charting single from Streisand’s LP.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“FLOAT ON”

The Floaters

ABC Records12284

 

Here’s a ‘One-Hit-Wonder’ in the No. 1 position on the Hot Soul Singles chart this week in ’77 from the Detroit vocal group, the Floaters with “Float On.” This spacey single was one of the biggest Soul hits of the year. The 45 RPM was in the second of six concurrent weeks as the boss on this chart. It reached No. 2 on the Pop Hot 100 Single list as well. The tune revolved around the singers separately boasting of their amorous ways by first giving their astrological sign, and proceeding to sing their own praises about how wonderful they’d be with a lover; almost like a competition advertising their wares to all the women of the world. Then, they told the ladies what they expect their perfect woman to be, and finally asking the females to pick them and “come with me.” Sounds like a male cat-fight, doesn’t it?  


The song featured a couple of brothers Ralph and Paul Mitchell (not to be confused with the hair-care products namesake) along with singers Charles Clark and Larry Cunningham. Another Mitchell brother (and a member of the Detroit Emeralds) James co-wrote “Float On” based on a dream he had, along with (another Detroit Emeralds member) Marvin Willis and Arnold Ingram. Where was Weird Al Yankovic when we needed him? Fear not, as “Float On” was parodied quite well by Cheech & Chong (Richard “Cheech” Marin and Tommy Chong) as “Bloat On” later in 1977. Just for laughs, listen to their comedy as the BLOATERS here. This is hysterical.


Their parody made it to No. 41 on the Hot 100 Singles chart on Ode Records. It showed up in 1980 on the Cheech & Chong LP and, of course, 8-track called Let’s Make A New Dope Deal. Their lampoon is indeed far out and even MORE spacey.

 THE

BIG
 ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 20, 1977

TOP LPS & TAPE CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘77:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

RUMOURS

Fleetwood Mac

Warner Bros. Records3010

This was the 15th of what would be a monumental 31 non-consecutive weeks as America’s principal album on the Top LPs & Tape chart. Rumours was quite auto-biographical; a relative diary of the disintegration of the relationships with virtually all the members of the band. There was so much nervous tension; it’s amazing that they were even able to finish work on what would become their biggest album ever. The single “Don’t Stop” was climbing the Hot 100 Singles chart during this survey-period, and would enjoy a one-week stay at No. 3 for the week ending on October 1, 1977. Here’s a live version of the tune.



The song “Don’t Stop” (written by Christine McVie who has rejoined the band after over a dozen years away) was used as a campaign theme for Bill Clinton’s first presidential aspiration. The song was about the break-up of Christine and John McVie, the band’s bass player and co-founder. Almost every cut on the LP was played on the radio, and several were good enough (in my opinion) to have been released as A side singles in addition to the 45 RPMs issued by Warner Bros. Records. The B side to the first single was called “Silver Springs” and was included on future re-issues of the LP, as it was intended to be included on the original release, but was cut by producers Ken Caillat and Richard Dashut due to time constraints.



The song was released from a compilation LP called 25 Years - The Chain in ’92, and a concert version on the live album call The Dance in 1997. The album Rumours was the initial LP to feature four Top 10 Hot 100 singles by a group, including: “Go Your Own Way,” (No. 10) “Dreams,” (No. 1) “Don’t Stop,” (No. 3) and “You Make Loving Fun” (No. 9) all in 1977.  Rumours won a Grammy® for Album of the Year, and has sold over 19 million copies in the U.S. alone; over 45 million globally.  

 

HOT SOUL ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

 

THE FLOATERS

The Floaters

ABC Records1030

The Floaters eponymous LP was in the third of six concurrent weeks on the Hot Soul LPs chart this week in ’77. That’s Dennis Coffey on the guitar on the song “Float On.” Coffey was the king of the wah-wah on many records recorded in Detroit by not only Motown but other labels and his own releases as well. His best known solo recording was the million-selling instrumental “Scorpio” in ’71 on Sussex Records. (See “Float On” above in The BIG Singles section.)

 


THE

BIG
 SINGLES

For the Chart-Week Ending

August 18, 1984

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

 

No. 5 (LW 6)“STUCK ON YOU”

Lionel Richie Motown1746

No. 4 (LW 2)“WHEN DOVES CRY”

Prince Warner Bros.29286

No. 3 (LW 3)“STATE OF SHOCK”

The Jacksons (Lead Vocals by Michael Jackson and Mick Jagger) Epic04503

No. 2 (LW 4)“WHAT’S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT”

Tina Turner Capitol5354

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“GHOSTBUSTERS” (From the Soundtrack LP Ghostbusters)

Ray Parker, Jr.

Arista Records1292

Ray Parker Jr. had his only No. 1 Hot 100 hit only a few months after Huey Lewis & the News reached No. 6 in ’84 with “I Want A New Drug”. Huey Lewis & the News settled out of court in a case that suggested that Parker’s hit was a plagiarization of their hit from the seven million-selling album Sports. The case was eventually settled out of court, but was brought back to life after comments were published by Parker after supposedly he wasn’t allowed to do so. You make the comparisons. First “I Want A New Drug.”



Next, compare that to Ray Parker, Jr. with “Ghostbusters.


This was the second of three back-to-back weeks as the leader of the Hot 100 Singles chart this week in ’84 for the song “Ghostbusters” on Arista Records. Ray Parker, Jr. had a nice career before doing the theme to Ivan Reitman’s “Ghostbusters.” Following the huge hit, Parker had a tough time making the Top 30 on the Pop charts; and only did that once more with the tune “Jamie” (the immediate follow-up to “Ghostbusters”) just reaching No. 14 on that list. Ray started getting noticed as a session musician and was picked to tour as a guitarist with Stevie Wonder as a teen, performed on the musical track for Holland-Dozier-Holland on the song “Want Ads” by Honey Cone and then formed the group Raydio in ’77. Out of the box, that group had a million-selling single called “Jack And Jill” a take-off on the nursery rhyme. That record proved to be no fluke, as the next song got to No. 9 Pop with “You Can’t Change That.” But change that he did, with the next release adding HIS name to the band’s moniker: Ray Parker, Jr. & Radio. Just three singles including the No. 4 hit “A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)” were released under that name. Another change was needed, and Raydio was jettisoned. After that it was all Ray Parker, Jr. with hits like: “The Other Woman” (No. 4) and “I Still Can’t Get Over Loving You” (No. 12) as the precursor to “Ghostbusters.” Here are a few more tidbits about the song and film. Who ya gonna call…John Belushi, Eddie Murphy and John Candy? The initial drafts of what became the film Ghostbusters (the working title was Ghostsmashers) had them as stars with Dan Aykroyd, who had written a screenplay with Harold Ramis. Belushi died, and both Murphy and Candy had other commitments; plus, the producers wanted a leaner budgeted scaled-down re-write. So, Aykroyd and Ramis went back to the drawing board and ended up with a New York setting that still featured Aykroyd and Ramis…but added Bill Murray, Sigourney Weaver and Ernie Hudson (with Rick Moranis and Annie Potts) to the cast. But they needed a theme-song, really fast.

Who ya gonna call…Lindsay Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac? If he is to be believed…yes. He says producers of the film approached him to write the theme for the movie. He passed, claiming he didn’t want to be known for writing film themes. (He’s already written a song called “Holiday Road” featured in one of the Vacation series of films.) After the studio couldn’t find the right song from over 60 submitted, they turned to Ray Parker, Jr. He found that rhyming something with the word ‘ghostbusters’ was easier said than done, so he simply had a group of people shout the word. The Detroit native Ray Erskine Parker received a star at the Hollywood Walk of Fame on March 6, 2014.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY TRACKS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’84:

 

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)  

“STUCK ON YOU”

Lionel Richie

Motown Records – 1746

Lionel Richie was once again on top of the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart with “Stuck On You” on Motown Records. It was the third of five ultimate weeks as that listings principal single. “Stuck On You” was released on May 1st of ’84 and reached No. 3 on the Hot 100 Singles chart at the end of August ’84. It attained the No. 8 position on the Hot Black Singles chart. Add to that, it charted on the Hot Country and Tracks chart at No. 24—an across the board winner. The record was the fourth single from the LP Can’t Slow Down.


The first single from the album Can’t Slow Down was the million-seller “All Night Long (All Night”) followed by “Running With The Night” (No. 7 Pop) and “Hello” yet another million-selling single. “Stuck On You” was that song’s follow-up. There was yet another single after “Stuck On You” called “Penny Lover, reaching No. 8 on the Pop side. Can’t Slow Down had been the No. 1 album on the Top 200 Albums chart for three weeks in later 1983. It would remain in the Top 10 of that chart for the entire year of 1984 as well. The LP was rewarded with a Grammy® for Album of the Year. Music publishing firm ASCAP later voted him Songwriter of the Year for his efforts in the years 1984, ’85 and ’86 and won the Golden Note Award from them in 2008.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART THIS WEEK IN ’84:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“WHEN DOVES CRY”

Prince

Warner Bros. Records – 29286

He hated his last name—Nelson; so Prince Rogers Nelson just dropped his middle and last name for his moniker, only to change it to just a symbol for a while. But as Prince, his current single “When Doves Cry” was in week number eight; the final week atop the Hot Black Singles chart. It had been the prime single on the Hot 100 for five straight weeks previously. Prince played almost every instrument on this cut and it was the last to be recorded for the film and soundtrack.


This was the first single from the film soundtrack of Purple Rain. The single sold over two-million copies and was the biggest-selling song of 1984. According to the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) this single was the last to gain Platinum status for over two-million transactions before the sales criteria changed and was lowered five years later. “When Doves Cry” was named the No. 1 single of the year by Billboard for both the Hot 100 and Hot Black Singles charts. Prince has been listed at the second biggest artist of the ‘80s, right behind Michael Jackson.

 

THE

BIG 
ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 18, 1984

TOP LPS & TAPE CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

PURPLE RAIN

Music from the Motion Picture Purple Rain starring PRINCE

Prince & the Revolution

Warner Bros. Records25110

Now celebrating its 30th anniversary, the soundtrack to the movie Purple Rain began its reign at the peak of the album chart starting with the week ending August 4, 1984, Prince owned the Top 200 Albums chart for the rest of the year plus the first two weeks in ’85 for a total of 24 weeks all together. The singles from this monumental LP were: “When Doves Cry” (see above in The BIG Singles section) followed by “Let’s Go Crazy” (No. 1 Pop and selling over one million copies) and about to enter the Hot 100 this week in ’84 after being released as a single on August 11th. Here’s a tantalizing video from Prince from a live performance on TV with 3rdEyeGirl.


Then, the title track “Purple Rain” was released on September 26th (No. 2 Pop and also another million-selling single) with “I Would Die For U” hitting the No. 8 spot on the Hot 100 and finally “Take Me With U” featuring Prince and Apollonia (Kotero) in a duet.

 

HOT BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘84

 

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

 

PURPLE RAIN

Music from the Motion Picture Purple Rain starring PRINCE

Prince & the Revolution

Warner Bros. Records25110

  

On this chart, Prince had the No. 1 slot for the fourth of an eventual 19 back-to-back weeks. (See above.)



(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
);