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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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August 1st, 2014






THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week ENDING

 August 3, 1966

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No. 5 (LW 6) “HURDY GURDY MAN”
DonovanEpic 10345

No. 4 (LW 1) “GRAZING IN THE GRASS”

Hugh MasekelaUNI55066

No. 3 (LW 3) “STONED SOUL PICNIC”

The 5th DimensionSoul City766

No. 2 (LW 8) “CLASSICAL GAS”

Mason WilliamsWarner Brothers7190

No. 1

(Last Week No. 9)

 

“HELLO, I LOVE YOU”

The Doors

Elektra Records45635

This week in ’68, while “Hello, I Love You” was resting in the No. 1 spot on the Hot 100 Singles chart, the Doors were finding ways to make supplementary news. During a performance on August 2nd at the New York Rock Festival, (introduced by legendary New York radio personality Scott Muni) the revolving stage malfunctioned after the Who performed and broke down completely during the Doors show. After the stage stopped moving, the NYPD and other security couldn’t hold back the crowd from rushing the stage after some 200 chairs were thrown—almost hitting the group—then thrown back by the band. The flash riot was attributed to the stage stopping, the presence of the cops plus Jim Morrison lying on the floor writhing while performing the long song, “The End.” That prevented the audience from seeing him properly. Well, the ‘end’ it was for that night, as the group had to exit the stage rapidly to keep from being trampled. The Doors did not perform this week’s No. 1 song that night in Queens.


The group was hitting a creative wall while trying to come up with new material for their third album, eventually titled Waiting For The Sun on Elektra Records. Just as they thought their third album would be their undoing, an old poem that Jim Morrison had written the year after graduating from film school was discovered by the son of Elektra president Jac Holzman. It was about Morrison and Ray Manzarek (who died in 2013) walking on the beach in Venice, California and encountering a thin African-American woman on the sand in her bikini. One can only surmise what they may have thought or said to the woman, but you get an idea with the lyrics of “Hello, I Love You” which was also shown on some 45 RPM single releases as “Hello, I Love You, Won’t You Tell Me Your Name.” Your Big Jay has both labels, of course. This was the first of two consecutive weeks at the pinnacle of the pop singles chart.     

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No. 1 

(Last Week No. 1):

“THIS GUY’S IN LOVE WITH YOU”

Herb Alpert

A&M Records – 929

It was the ninth of an amazing 10 uninterrupted weeks for the implausible singing ability of Herb Alpert on the Bacharach/David song, “This Guy’s In Love With You” on A&M Records. Herb had performed in a filmed version for the song (see video below) intended for a TV special called The Beat Of The Brass, never believing there would be such an outcry for the song to be released that he sang to his then wife Sharon; filmed on the beach in Malibu, CA. His company A&M records swiftly got the 45 RPM to the marketplace just 24 hours after CBS Television was swamped with inquiries about the song on the network.


All of Alpert’s previous Hot 100 Singles chart releases that reached the Top 30 were instrumentals. It would take another 11 years, but Alpert had his first and only instrumental No. 1 Hot 100 chart hit with the jazzy/disco release, “Rise” also on A&M.

 

BEST SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“GRAZING IN THE GRASS”

 

Hugh Masekela

UNI Records55066

South African trumpet player Hugh Masekela held the No. 1 spot on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles chart this week in ’68 on UNI Records with “Grazing In The Grass.” UNI Records was under the wing of Universal Studios who also wanted in on this rock & roll thing. This was the last of four back-to-back weeks at that chart’s zenith for the instrumental—in a year when instrumentals had a good run—including songs like: “Love Is Blue,” “The Good, The Bad & The Ugly,” “Classical Gas,” “Soul Limbo” and others. Earlier, Hugh Masekela received a scholarship for his trumpet playing at the Royal Academy of Music in London, England in the late ‘50s. Then, he obtained another four-year scholarship to the Manhattan School of Music in New York City with the help of people like Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba. He later married her before she had the hit in America called “Pata Pata.” They later divorced. “Grazing In The Grass” was a song Masekela was given by a friend, performer and songwriter from South Africa named Phelemon Hou. Handed the song on tape, Hugh adapted it after one of his band member’s heard it, recommending the song as a last minute filler track for the album The Promise Of The Future based on Hou’s performance. It’s been reported Hou was in the studio and helped come up with the final melody while the backing track was recorded in L.A.   


Masekela’s music was labeled as “Afro-Jazz.” “Grazing In The Grass” had been the No. 1 song on the Hot 100 Singles chart for two weeks before “Hello, I Love You” (see above) took over this week in ’68. Inundated with requests to add lyrics, an official license to do so was given to RCA Records. A remake of “Grazing In The Grass” was a hit in 1969 by the vocal group Friends Of Distinction who reached the No. 3 position on the Hot 100 and No. 5 on the R&B chart. Lyrics to that version were written by group member Harry Elston. A group member of the Friends Of Distinction, Jessica Cleaves, died just this May at age 65. A footnote in the history of Pop music; Masekela was the guy who played the horn solo on the minor Byrds hit “So You Want To Be A Rock & Roll Star” in ’67.

 

THE

BIG
 ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 2, 1968

TOP LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

No. 1

THE BEAT OF THE BRASS

Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass  

A&M Records4146

Recorded in the same recording complex as this week’s No. 1 R&B single “Grazing In The Grass” by Hugh Masekela (see above)—the entire No. 1 album on the Top LPs chart from Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass on A&M Records was also done in L.A.’s Gold Star Studio. Alpert’s easy-going vocal of “This Guy’s In Love With You” catapulted the album to the No. 1 slot for this the second of two weeks at the apex. An earlier single, an instrumental from the Broadway musical Cabaret, was a minor hit—only reaching No. 72 on the Hot 100—and only lingering for six weeks. 


But even without “This Guy’s In Love With You” to bolster the album’s tune-roster, the Tijuana Brass franchise was still on a roll, as adults seemed to love the Latin-flavored songs put together largely by the “Wrecking Crew,” the top-flight studio musicians masquerading as the Tijuana Brass. This album was the last chart-topping LP for Alpert’s ensemble, regardless of whether or not they were a real band.

BEST SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ’68:

No. 1

 

ARETHA NOW

Aretha Franklin

Atlantic Records8186

The right-rockin,’ good-lookin,’ good-cookin’ Queen of Soul—Lady Re was enjoying a new reign at the thrown of the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues LPs chart this week in ’68 with her fourth Atlantic Records album, Aretha Now. The album was in the second of an eventual 17 non-consecutive weeks on the R&B LP chart. Highlights from this album were “Think,” (just beginning its decent from the singles charts after reaching No. 1 on the R&B singles chart for three weeks and a million-selling single) “I Say A Little Prayer” (No. 10 Pop) and the Steve Cropper and Don Covay song (No. 14 and a million-seller) “See Saw.” The B side of “Think” was a remake of Sam Cooke’s “You Send Me” and was minor hit on its own. Oddly, Aretha Franklin’s current A side and just released was “The House That Jack Built” (No. 6 Pop and a million-seller) and NOT on this LP, but was just on the loose on what became a dual-sided 45 RPM hit with “I Say A Little Prayer.” Here’s a cool slightly slower live British TV version on the Cliff Richard Show of that B side also just beginning its ride up the singles chart this week—eventually reaching No. 10 on the Pop side in the U.S.


Aretha’s version of “I Say A Little Prayer” became her biggest hit in the U.K. which may explain why Cliff Richard’s TV producers included this song, along with the vocal backing of the Sweet Inspirations on the program. In fact, the British publication New Musical Express gave the Queen of Soul’s adaptation of the Bacharach & David song the No. 1 position by their critics as the TOP single out of 150 reviewed up to that date in 1987! That’s BIG. Aretha Now reached No. 5 on the Top LPs Pop chart in America in ’68. The album was executive produced by Jerry Wexler who championed Lady Soul’s newfound success by letting her write and find material more suited to her talents. It didn’t hurt that the incredible aptitude of engineer Tom Dowd and arrangements by Arif Mardin stand the test of time on this album.  



THE

BIG
 SINGLES

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 5, 1978

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

No. 5 (LW 1)“SHADOW DANCING”

Andy Gibb RSO893

No. 4 (LW 1)“LAST DANCE”

Donna Summer Casablanca926

No. 3 (LW 5)“GREASE”

Frankie Valli RSO897

No. 2 (LW 6)“THREE TIMES A LADY”

The Commodores Motown1443

No. 1

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“MISS YOU”

The Rolling Stones

Rolling Stones Records19307

The stronghold of seven weeks in the No. 1 position of the Hot 100 Singles chart by Andy Gibb’s “Shadow Dancing” came to an end when the Bad Boys of Rock & Roll had a ‘disco’ song on top of the chart with “Miss You” on their own Rolling Stones Records. The Stones have made it quite clear they weren’t necessarily trying to make a ‘disco’ record, calling it a ‘New York’ record; but either way, its dance groove didn’t hurt the song during this dancing craze that was sweeping not just Fun City, but the rest of the nation by this time in ’78. The song was VERY New York, with many references to the scenes in the city at the time.


The song “Miss You” was at the crest of the Hot 100 for just a sole week, replaced by “Three Times A Lady” by the Commodores. Their current album Some Girls had already been the Top LP in the U.S. for two weeks earlier in July; the first full album to feature guitarist Ron Wood. The Stones album, true to form, caused controversy as only the Stones could. The front cover of the LP was the hot item in the press. It featured pictures of various celebrities and drawings of ads for lingerie along with the Stones dressed in drag. The cover was quickly replaced after legal action by notable people protesting their likenesses, including: the estates of Marilyn Monroe and Judy Garland, along with Raquel Welch, Lucille Ball and Farah Fawcett. The revised version still included a picture of George Harrison, who obviously was in on the joke. The album also featured some of the best music the Rolling Stones had put out in a number of years, including the singles: “Beast Of Burden” and “Shattered.” There was also a dance mix of “Miss You” on a 12-inch single which was a longer version featuring more of the stunning drumming of Charlie Watts and gut-busting bass from Bill Wyman. All of the songs on the Some Girls LP were written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (the Glimmer Twins) except for a remake of “Just My Imagination (Running Away With Me)” made famous by the Temptations and written by Motown’s Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART
THIS WEEK IN ‘78

 

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

“SONGBIRD”

Barbra Streisand

Columbia Records – 10756

 

This week in ’78, Barbra Streisand held the peak position on the Easy Listening Singles chart with “Songbird” on Columbia Records. Her album of the same name featured the Diva holding a dog, with a cute little note underneath the LP’s title saying, “Sorry, couldn’t find a bird.”


“Songbird” was in the second of a two-week run on the Easy Listening Singles chart, though on the Pop Hot 100, it was just able to get as high as No. 25. Columbia must not have been the hot on “Songbird,” as the label released another single within weeks. The song “Prisoner (Love Theme from Laura Mars)” starring Faye Dunaway, kind of pushed “Songbird” out of the way quickly. But in doing so, being released just five weeks into the run of the “Songbird,” it diminished BOTH recordings reaching the heights on the Pop chart. Guitarist, arranger and songwriter David Wolfert, along with lyricist Stephen Nelson wrote “Songbird.” Wolfert co-wrote the 1962 hit “Bobby’s Girl” by Marcie Blane and produced songs like “Southern Nights” by Glen Campbell and “Here You Come Again” for Dolly Parton produced Streisand’s album Songbird.

HOT SOUL SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

No. 1

(Last Week No. 2)

“BOOGIE OOGIE OOGIE”

A Taste Of Honey

Capitol Records4565

The Hot Soul Singles chart saw just how big “Boogie Oogie Oogie” was from the group A Taste Of Honey. The song was No. 1 this week in ’78 on that chart, but it would be a few more weeks before it scaled the heights of the Hot 100. Indeed, it would be the nation’s biggest record for three consecutive weeks during the first three full weeks of September ’78. It ended up being one of the biggest 45 RPM hits in America, selling well over two-million copies. The group A Taste Of Honey went on to win a Grammy® for Best New Artist of 1978. Watch an extended live version of the song “Boogie Oogie Oogie” below.


The two women who were the face of A Taste Of Honey also played on recordings. They were Janice-Marie Johnson, who performed on bass guitar and co-wrote the song, with Hazel Payne, playing guitar. The guys in the ensemble were Perry Kibble on keyboards (who co-founded the group in L.A. along with Janice-Marie and co-writer of the mega-hit) and Donald Ray Johnson on drums. Kibble died of heart failure in Canada in 199 at age 49. Janice was of Stockbridge-Munsee-Mohican ancestry, and was inducted into the Native American Music Association Hall of Fame in 2008. She calls the song, “My lifeblood.” A Taste Of Honey had another big hit in 1981, with a version in English of the Japanese song “Sukiyaki” made famous by Kyu Sakamoto in America in 1963. Sakamoto was one of the people killed in Japan Airlines flight 123 that crashed into Osaka Ridge in 1985; the most deadly single aircraft crash in history, killing 525 of the 529 passengers and crew on board.   

 

THE

BIG
 ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 5, 1978

TOP LPS & TAPE CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

No. 1

GREASE:

The Original Soundtrack to the Motion Picture

Various Artists

RSO RecordsRS-2-4002

RSO records seemingly could do no wrong. With the release of the movie soundtrack to Grease, the record company had a mega-hit album plus various singles to mine from it. This was the second of an ultimate 12 non-consecutive survey-periods in the pinnacle position on the Top LPs & Tape chart. The first single from the two-album set was the title track “Grease” from Frankie Valli. I had the honor of interviewing Valli immediately following the recording of his vocals under the direction of Barry Gibb at the Criterion Studio in Miami. He told me he had just done the vocals for a new movie and was very excited to work with Gibb. RSO Records released the track as the first offering, despite the fact that the film’s director Randal Klieser didn’t think it fit the ‘50s-era film. Valli had nothing to do with the flick except for the song! Here’s an abbreviated clip of Valli lip-syncing the song on a TV show.


He also didn’t think the song “You’re The One That I Want” featuring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John was right for the movie for the same reason. Both “Grease” and their mega-hit became No. 1 songs despite not sounding or lyrically compatible with ‘50s music. “You’re The One That I Want” is one of the biggest singles ever in the U.K. The soundtrack album featured these subsequent singles in America: “Summer Nights” (No. 5 Pop) also featuring Travolta and Newton-John and Cast (which was a bigger hit in the U.K. than in the U.S.—selling over a million and a half copies in Britain) “Hopelessly Devoted To You” (No. 3 Pop/No. 7 Easy Listening/No. 20 Hot Country Tracks chart) from Olivia solo, and “Greased Lightning” by Travolta solo which only managed to reach No. 47 on the Hot 100. Perhaps by that point Greasemania had reached its peak. The rest of the album featured several cuts from Sha Na Na and other artists.

 

HOT SOUL ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

No. 1

NATURAL HIGH

The Commodores

Motown RecordsM7-902R1

 

This week in ’78 was the seventh of a definitive eight non-consecutive survey-periods in the No. 1 spot on the Hot Soul LPs chart for the Commodores with Natural High. The album was their sixth and was best known for the single “Three Times A Lady” featuring Lionel Richie on vocals. The album version was a full three-minutes longer than the official single on Motown Records. Here’s that longer version.


Lionel went on to super-stardom not long after “Three Times A Lady” indicated just how strong a songwriter and solo performer he was. The song was inspired by Richie’s father talking about Lionel’s mom. This record was an across-the-board crossover for the Commodores, reaching No. 1 on the Hot 100 next week (for two weeks) in ’78, as well as hitting the apex of the Easy Listening Singles chart for two weeks beginning next week and the crest of the Hot Soul Singles chart for the same two weeks as well. There was another minor single off the album Natural High called “Flying High.” The LP got to No. 3 on the Top LPs & Tape chart as well. The group also made a short appearance in the disco-exploitation film in ’78 called Thank God It’s Friday, singing the song “Too Hot To Trot” which was from that film’s soundtrack and was a No. 1 song on the Hot Soul Singles chart back in February of ’78 for just one week. It attained the No. 24 spot at its peak on the Hot 100 and was also included on the Commodores Greatest Hits album in ’78.

THE

BIG
 SINGLES

For the Chart-Week Ending

August 5, 1989

HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘89:

 

No. 5 (LW 1)“TOY SOLDIERS”

Martika Columbia68747

No. 4 (LW 10)“RIGHT HERE WAITING”

Richard Marx EMI50219

No. 3 (LW 4)“SO ALIVE”

Love And Rockets RCA8956

No. 2 (LW 5)“ON OUR OWN”

Bobby Brown MCA55362

No. 1

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“BATDANCE”

Prince

Warner Brothers Records22924

 

Prince Rogers Nelson got back to the top of the Hot 100 Singles chart after a nearly five-year No. 1 drought with “Batdance,” which even included a snippet of the 1966 Neal Hefti TV Batman theme. This song was just a part of Batman™: The Motion Picture Soundtrack to the Michael Keaton 1989 version of the Caped Crusader franchise. The ‘Purple-One’ used every hook in the book to make this a smash. “Batdance” was on top of this chart for just a sole week.

“Batdance” used dialog from the Tim Burton film in small segments, and was utilized as a sort of overture for the rest of the music in the film. Albert Magnoli assisted and directed Prince for the first time since their collaboration on Purple Rain back in ’84. The edited single version (45 RPM) of the song didn’t have the searing guitar solo intact. This single sold over a million copies for Warner Brothers Records. The movie soundtrack to “Batman,” from which “Batdance” sprang, went on to sell over four and a half million copies in the U.S. The second single from the soundtrack was “Partyman” gaining the No. 18 position on the Hot 100 (No. 5 on the Hot Black Singles list) followed by a duet with one of his muses, Sheena Easton, with the ballad “The Arms Of Orion” getting to No. 36 on the Pop chart. Prince was included in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame during his first year eligible in 2004.   

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES CHART
THIS WEEK IN ’89:

 

No. 1

“RIGHT HERE WAITING”

Richard Marx

EMI Records – 50219

 

Singer Richard Marx had reached super-stardom, as the song, “Right Here Waiting” on EMI Records was No. 1 on the Adult Contemporary Singles chart this week in ’89. It would become the biggest hit in the land next week for three back-to-back survey-periods on the Hot 100 Singles chart. This was the third consecutive No. 1 record for Marx, with his previous chart-toppers “Satisfied” and “Hold On To The Nights.”


His first three singles outings didn’t too to shabbily either, with his debut “Don’t Mean Nothing,” (No. 3 Pop) followed by another No. 3 hit “Should’ve Known Better” and the preview to his No. 1 songs, the No. 2 hit, “Endless Summer Nights.” Richard Marx peaked with “Right Here Waiting,” yet maintained hit-status for the next seven years with varying degrees of chart-status. The follow-up to “Right Here Waiting” from his second album Repeat Offender reached No. 4 on the Hot 100, making him the first solo artist to have his initial seven releases reach Top 5-status on that chart. Richard Noel Marx got his big break from Lionel Richie who invited him to sing background vocals on some of the former Commodores singer’s tracks, including: “You Are,” “Running With The Night” and “Dancing On The Ceiling.” Marx married dancer/singer/actress Cynthia Rhodes, but recently announced they were divorcing after a quarter-century of marriage.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART
THIS WEEK IN ’89:

No. 1

“ON OUR OWN”

Bobby Brown

MCA Records – 55362

As we anxiously await the much delayed Ghostbusters III film, it was 25 years ago that Ghostbusters II was in theaters and the soundtrack to that movie was in record stores. Remember those? Bobby Brown, one of the originators of ‘New Jack Swing,’ was on top of the Hot Black Singles chart with “On Our Own” from the soundtrack of the second film in the franchise for Ivan Reitman, Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Sigourney Weaver, Harold Ramis, Ric Moranis, Ernie Hudson, Peter MacNichol and Annie Potts. The song peaked this week at No. 2 on the Hot 100.


Bobby Brown had already made his mark on the music charts, initially as a member of New Edition with hits like: “Candy Girl,” “Cool It Now” and “Mr. Telephone Man.” He broke away from the R&B vocal group in ’86, and initially hit a snag with a dud release. He recovered in ’88 with “Don’t Be Cruel” (No. 8 Pop) followed by his first solo No. 1 song, “My Prerogative.” His next four singles reached the Top 7, including: “Roni,” (No. 3 Pop) “Every Little Step,” (No. 3 Pop as well) plus this week’s No. 2 Pop hit “On Our Own” which became a million-selling single and finally “Rock Wit’cha” reaching No. 7 Pop. Brown was included on another No. 1 Pop hit by Glenn Medeiros called “She Ain’t Worth It” in 1990. His career seemingly took a back seat after he married Whitney Houston, who joined Brown on a few tracks. They divorced in 2007. Brown married again in June 2012.  Houston had died just four months earlier that year.   

THE

BIG
 ALBUMS

For the Chart-Week ENDING

August 5, 1989

TOP LPS & TAPE CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘89:

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

BATMAN™:

Motion Picture Soundtrack

Prince

Warner Brothers Records25936-1

 

This week in 1989, Batman™: Motion Picture Soundtrack was now it the third of an eventual six survey-periods as the principal (get the pun??) album in the U.S. by Prince on Warner Brothers Records. The movie soundtrack to film (from which this week’s No. 1 song “Batdance” sprang) went on to sell over four and a half million copies in the U.S. alone. (See above.) 



Remember the Gotham City Museum desecration in the film? The second single from the soundtrack was “Partyman” used in that scene, gaining the No. 18 position on the Hot 100 (No. 5 on the Hot Black Singles list—see the Prince video above.) The third single from the soundtrack was a duet with one of Prince’s protégé’s, Sheena Easton, with the ballad “The Arms Of Orion” getting to No. 36 on the Pop chart. Prince was included in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame during his first year eligible in 2004. Prince opened his own Paisley Park Studios in suburban Minneapolis, Minnesota—Chanhassen to be exact—in 1987. He recorded the entire soundtrack there. In addition, during this summer of ’89, Madonna recorded her album Like A Virgin there, as well as Fine Young Cannibals with their LP The Raw And The Cooked plus Paula Abdul laid down the tracks for her record Forever Your Girl album in the Prince-owned facility.

 

    TOP BLACK ALBUMS CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘89

No. 1

(Last Week No. 1)

 

WALKING WITH A PANTHER

LL Cool J

Def Jam/Columbia Records45274

Ladies Love Cool James—that they did in 1989, and still do. They liked him as a teenager performing Rap music while going to Andrew Jackson High School in Queens, NY. He dropped out after his success with his first release, “I Need A Beat” in 1984. This was just the start for James Todd Smith, as in 1989, he had the Top Black Album chart-leader this week for the second of four successive survey-periods. Walking With A Panther was called a ‘sell-out’ Hip-Hop album by some reviewers for its mainstream appeal, as it reached No. 6 on the Top Pop Albums chart as well. He was even booed at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, as he admitted he was out of touch with his ‘Rap’ constituency at the time. LL Cool J had his first million-selling single with “Going Back To Cali” on Def Jam Records. His next single, “I’m That Type Of Guy” reached No. 15 on the Hot 100. Next up as a single track was “Big Ole Butt,” and while it didn’t reach the mainstream chart, it did get to No. 13 on the Hot Rap Singles chart. This is as steamy as your Big Jay wants to get in this weekly feature.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84LUpG6ieis

The track “One Shot At Love” followed up “Big Ole Butt,” and “Jingling Baby” rounded out the singles from the album. Only the first two singles made the mainstream lists this time around, but were both million-sellers. LL Cool J went on to acting in several movies and is considered one of the hottest actors in Hollywood, playing Special Agent Sam Hanna on CBS Television since 2009. NCIS: Los Angeles. He has been the host of the last three Grammy® Awards shows. James was nominated but not inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame for the Class of 2014.  




(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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