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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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November 20th, 2015
 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

NOVEMBER 27, 1965

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘69:

 

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

**********************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 12)

“YOU’VE GOT TO HIDE YOU’RE LOVE AWAY”

(John Lennon / Paul McCartney)

Not credited, but Produced by: JOHN LENNON

Not credited, but Arranged by: PAUL McCARTNEY

Recorded in England

THE SILKIE

FONTANA Records  F-1525

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 14)

“I GOT YOU (I FEEL GOOD”

(From his movie Ski Party)

(James Brown)

Produced by: JAMES BROWN

JAMES BROWN

And The FAMOUS FLAMES

KING Records  45-K-1261

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 8)

“AIN’T THAT PECULIAR”

(Warren Moore / Wm. Robinson / Robert Rogers / Marvin Tarplin)

Produced by: “SMOKEY”

MARVIN GAYE

TAMLA Records  T-54122

******************************

No. 7  (LW 9)

“A TASTE OF HONEY”

(Bobby Scott / Ric Marlow)

Produced by: HERB ALPERT and JERRY MOSS

Arranged by: HERB ALPERT

Engineered by: LARRY LEVINE at GOLD STAR STUDIOS

HERB ALPERT

And the TIJUANA BRASS

A&M Records  AM 775

******************************

No. 6  (LW 4)

“RESCUE ME”

(Carl Smith / Raynard Miner)

Produced by: BILLY DAVIS, CARL SMITH & RAYNARD MINER under the supervision of BILLY DAVIS

Arranged by: PHIL WRIGHT

FONTELLA BASS

CHECKER Records  1120

******************************

No. 5  (LW 3)

“GET OFF MY CLOUD”

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richard)

Produced by: ANDREW LOOG-OLDHAM

Engineered by: DAVE HASSINGER

THE ROLLING STONES

LONDON Records  45 LON 0792

******************************

No. 4  (LW 5)

“LET’S HANG ON”

(Bob Crewe / Denny Randell / Sandy Linzer)

Vocal Produced by: BOB CREWE

Arranged and Conducted by: CHARLIE CALELLO

THE 4 SEASONS

Featuring the “sound” of Frankie Valli

PHILIPS Records  40317

******************************

No. 3  (LW 2)

“I-2-3”

(John Madera / David White / Leonard Borisoff  Added later due to litigation: Eddie Holland / Lamont Dozier / Brian Holland)

Produced by: JOHN MADERA – DAVID WHITE

Arranged by: JIMMY WISNER

LEN BARRY

DECCA Records  31827

******************************

No. 2  (LW 6)

“TURN! TURN! TURN! (To Everything There Is A Season)”

(Words: From the Book of Ecclesiastes Adaptation and Music from: PETE SEGER)

Produced by: TERRY MELCHER

THE BYRDS

COLUMBIA Records 4-43424

******************************

 No.1

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“I HEAR A SYMPHONY”



(Brian Holland / Lamont Dozier / Eddie Holland)

 

Flip-Side:

“WHO COULD EVER DOUBT MY LOVE”

 

 

THE SUPREMES

MOTOWN RecordsM-1083

 

Production by:

BRIAN HOLLAND & LAMONT DOZIER

 

Musicians:

“THE FUNK BROTHERS”

 

  

The Supremes missed the Hot 100’s Top 10 and halted a five-string run at No. 1 with the single before “I Hear A Symphony.” While other acts would have killed to have “Nothing But Heartaches” even in the just the Top 40, Berry Gordy, Jr. got very nervous after that 45 RPM stalled at No. 11. Let’s face it; not many acts can follow themselves up with a No. 1 song after their first—let alone five. It showed that even with Motown’s new-found clout, the company, singers, writers and producers were not able to have a batting average of 1,000. Some musicologists suggest (your Biggest Jay included) that “Nothing But Heartaches” was performed in a minor key, and was a downer lyrically, but quite upbeat musically. Not every song can be positive about love, complete with, “Moon, swoon and June.” Add to this, 1965 ultimately had 25 No. 1 records on the Hot 100; more than ANY year to date during the rock era. That made competition greater, as the British Invasion didn’t let up one bit that year; nor did a prolific amount of incredible product available from all corners of the nation from major record labels and small independent companies during this time-period in American music history. So the pressure was put on everyone at Motown to have another No. 1 Pop hit. This especially fell upon the writers and producers of product for the Supremes. Brian and Eddie Holland along with Lamont Dozier were feeling the force from their boss to return the “girls” to the top. They didn’t disappoint with the stellar success of the act’s sixth No. 1, “I Hear A Symphony.” Here’s a live version, complete with what looked like a real symphony orchestra. This was a quite sterile version of “I Hear A Symphony.”  

One kind of controversial idea about the success of songs like this one is shared by some music historians. These were African-American artists targeting their appeal to Black and White teen audiences (“The Sound of YOUNG America”) and adults simultaneously. Berry Gordy, Jr. purposely began booking the Supremes into “white” nightclubs. That wasn’t an easy task during a time in the U.S.A. when the Civil Rights Act was new. Remember, Rhythm & Blues records didn’t always cross over to the mainstream Pop lists in high chart positions. In fact, if you look at all of the No. 1 songs for 1965, you’ll note that the only R&B acts reaching No. 1 WERE from the Motown Corporation. Those songs included, in order of appearance in ‘65: “My Girl” from the Temptations, “Stop! In The Name Of Love” by the Supremes, “Back In My Arms Again” again from the trio, “I Can’t Help Myself” by Four Tops, and this week’s No. 1 song, “I Hear A Symphony.” No other black artists reached the apex of the Hot 100 in ’65. And, believe it or not, Motown had the only R&B No. 1 songs on the Hot 100 in ’64 as well. That distinction would never happen again, as a diverse bunch of companies big and small were able to reach the top of the Hot 100 with African-American performers from those two years on—although Motown remained strong through the early ‘80s.

  

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

NOVEMBER 24, 1979

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79:

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 10)

“POP MUZIK”

(Robin Scott)

Produced by: MIDASCARE Productions

M

SIRE Records  SRE 49033

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 8)

“TUSK”

(Lindsey Buckingham)

Produced by: FLEETWOOD MAC (with Special Thanks from the Band to LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM) with RICHARD DASHUT and KEN CAILLAT

FLEETWOOD MAC

With the U.S.C. Trojan Marching Band

WARNER BROS. Records  WBS 49077

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 14)

“SEND ONE YOUR LOVE”

(Stevie Wonder)

Produced & Arranged by: STEVIE WONDER

 

STEVIE WONDER

TAMLA Records  T 54303F

******************************

No. 7  (LW 7)

“YOU DECORATED MY LIFE”

(Debbie Hupp / Bob Morrison)

Produced by: LARRY BUTLER

Engineered by: BILLY SHIRRILL

KENNY ROGERS

UNITED ARTISTS Records  UA-X1315-Y

******************************

No. 6  (LW 9)

“PLEASE DON’T GO”

(Harry Wayne Casey / Richard Finch)

Produced by: CASEY / FINCH for SUNSHINE SOUND Enterprises, Inc. ®

K.C. AND THE SUNSHINE BAND

TK Records  TKX-1035

******************************

No. 5  (LW 5)

“HEARTACHE TONIGHT”

(Don Henley / Glenn Frey / Bob Seger / John David Souther)

Produced and Engineered by: BILL SZYMCZYK for PANDORA Productions, Ltd.

EAGLES

ASYLUM Records – E-46545-A

******************************

No. 4  (LW 2)

“DIM ALL THE LIGHTS”

(Donna Summer)

Produced by: GIORGIO MORODER & PETE BELLOTTE

Arranged by: HAROLD FALTERMEYER

DONNA SUMMER

CASABLANCA Records  NB 2201

******************************

 

No. 3  (LW 1)

“STILL”

(Lionel Richie)

Produced and Arranged by: JAMES ANTHONY CARMICHCAEL & COMMODORES

COMMODORES

MOTOWN Records  M 1474F

******************************

No. 2  (LW 4)

“BABE”

(Dennis DeYoung)

Produced by: STYX:

DENNIS De YOUNG, CHUCK PONOZZO, JAMES YOUNG, TOMMY SHAW and JOHN PONOZZO

STYX

A&M Records  2188

******************************



 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 3)

“NO MORE TEARS (Enough Is Enough)”



(Paul Jabara / Bruce Roberts)

 

 

BARBRA STREISAND / DONNA SUMMER

 

COLUMBIA Records1-11125

 

Produced by:

 

GARY KLEIN for THE ENTERTAINMENT Company in Association with Giorgio Moroder’s Productions

 

Arranged and Conducted by:

 

GREG MATHIESON

 

Donna Summer appears through the Courtesy of Casablanca, Record & Filmworks, Inc.

 

 

This week’s No. 1 song in the U.S.A. had two of the leading stars in Pop recording history co-headlining. “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” from Barbra Streisand and Donna Summer was in the opening segment of a two week stay at the zenith of the Hot 100 Singles chart. No one could have anticipated Barbra Streisand having a No. 1 Pop record with a DISCO song; but with the assistance of Donna Summer, it became an actuality. The truth is that Donna, the Disco Diva, was red hot at that moment; but somehow the inspiration of pairing the two singers went fabulously. Summer was also sitting in the No. 4 position after peaking at No. 2 with “Dim All The Lights” during this same survey-phase in ’79. But the song that made the highest achievement on the Hot 100 this week in ’79 was “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” which appeared on Streisand’s then present album Wet, and Summers’ LP On The Radio: Greatest Hits Volumes I & II. The song’s co-writer, Bruce Roberts, has claimed he and Paul Jabara picked up Donna and went directly to Streisand’s home to pitch the song to her. Reportedly, before any of the Brooklyn-born Diva’s peeps and lawyers could say no, the two female superstars were singing the song. Just days later, the duet was officially recorded in the studio. Here’s a fascinating occurrence of aural pleasure you’ve likely never listened to; bringing to light a de-constructed rendering of the song, where you can hear the command of both vocalists doing tracks for the song…including a word we can’t say on the radio by Summer. You’ll get a new appreciation for the completed song when you hear it. **WARNING—MAY NOT BE SAFE FOR WORK.**

There were two somewhat different versions of the single released as they were on two different record labels; Streisand’s Columbia and Summer’s Casablanca for European countries.

Summer’s version was a bit more rock-slanted with further production done by German producer Harold Faltermeyer, celebrated for writing the song “Axel F” from the film Beverly Hills Cop, for his construction of the Top Gun theme, and for soundtrack handiwork for the films American Gigolo along with Midnight Express. Summer died of lung cancer at the age of 63 in 2012.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

 

For the   Chart-Week

ENDING

NOVEMBER 28, 1987

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 14)

“SHAKE YOUR LOVE”

(Debbie Gibson)

Produced by: FRED ZARR for BIZARR MUSIC, Inc.

Arranged by: FRED ZARR & DEBBIE GIBSON  

DEBBIE GIBSON

ATLANTIC Records 7-89187

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 12)

“I’VE BEEN IN LOVE BEFORE”

(Nick van Eede)

Produced & Mixed by: STEVE THOMPSON & MICHAEL BARBIERO

CUTTING CREW

VIRGIN Records  99425

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 11)

“WE’LL BE TOGETHER”

(Sting)

Produced by: Bryan Loren & Sting

Arranged by: Sting

 

A&M Records  AM-2983

******************************

No. 7  (LW 4)

“I THINK WE’RE ALONE NOW”

(Ritchie Cordell)

Produced by: GEORGE E. TOBIN

TIFFANY

MCA Records  53167

******************************

No. 6  (LW 5)

“BRILLIANT DISGUISE”

(Bruce Springsteen)

Produced by: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, JON LANDAU & CHUCK PLOTKIN

Recorded & Engineered by: TOBY SCOTT

Mixed by: BOB CLEARMOUNTAIN

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN

COLUMBIA Records  38-07595

******************************

No. 5  (LW 10)

“FAITH”

(George Michael)

Arranged & Produced by: GEORGE MICHAEL

Engineered by: CHRIS PORTER

GEORGE MICHAEL

COLUMBIA Records – 38-07623

******************************

No. 4  (LW 7)

“SHOULD’VE KNOWN BETTER”

(Richard Marx)

Produced by: HUMBERTO GATICA for HUM PRODUCTIONS, Inc.

Remixed by: DAVID COLE

RICHARD MARX

MANHATTAN (Capitol) Records  B-50083

******************************

No. 3  (LW 1)

“MONY MONY”

(Tommy James / Ritchie Cordell / Bo Gentry)

Produced by: KEITH FORSEY

BILLY IDOL

CHRYSALIS Records  CHS 2543

******************************

No. 2  (LW 3)

“HEAVEN IS A PLACE ON EARTH”

(Rick Nowels / Ellen Shipley)

Produced & Arranged by: Rick Nowels

BELINDA CARLISLE

MCA Records 53181

******************************

 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“(I’VE HAD) THE TIME OF MY LIFE”

(Love Theme From Dirty Dancing)



(Franke Previte / John DiNicola / Donald Markowitz)

 

Flip-Side:

 

“LOVE IS STRANGE”

MICKEY AND SYLVIA

(Ethel Smith / Mickey Baker / Sylvia Robinson

(Originally charting in 1957, peaking at No. 11 on Groove Records – 0175)

 

 

BILL MEDLEY AND

JENNIFER WARNES

 

RCA Records5224

 

Produced by:

MICHAEL LLOYD

 

Arranged by: GENE PAGE

Addition Arrangement by: JOHN DeANDREA & MICHAEL LLOYD

 

 

Franke and the Knockouts “Sweetheart” songwriter (No. 10 Pop in ’81) and Jersey guy Franke Previte had recorded this week’s biggest 45 RPM with a female vocalist named Rachele Cappelli as a demonstration record; shopping it with music producer Jimmy Ienner. Here’s that “DEMO” record that you’ve likely never heard.

Previte has told your Big Jay that he almost turned down the producer when Franke was solicited for a song for an imminent “little” motion picture called Dirty Dancing. He initially said, “No,” mainly because his main priority was trying to get a new recording agreement with his group. Previte had co-written “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life)” with John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz; ultimately landing an Academy Award® for Best Original Song for the principal hit from the soundtrack of Dirty Dancing. The original demo’s instrumental track was what Ienner heard over the phone; commissioning Previte to come up with lyrics quickly. Previte wrote the lyrics while driving on the nearly always crowded Garden State Parkway in NJ. Franke had co-written that melody earlier with DeNicola and Markowitz. The songwriters also shared a Golden Globe® for Best Original Song and Righteous Brothers co-founder Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes; mostly known from her previous duet—a multi-award-winner with Joe Cocker called “Up Where We Belong” from the film An Officer and a Gentleman. Warnes had a No. 6 Pop & No. 1 Adult Contemporary hit in ’77 called “Right Time Of The Night” on Arista Records. Previte, DiNicola and Markowitz’s composition had also been nominated for a Grammy® Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media in the first year of that category; losing to “Somewhere Out There” written by James Horner, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil from the film An American Tale as sung by Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram. “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” was this week’s No. 1 Hot 100 Singles chart hit, remaining there for just this sole week; yet, it was in the second of an ultimate four survey-periods on the Adult Contemporary singles listing.

Medley had to be convinced by producer Jimmy Lenner to sing this song, after Bill got stung on his previous soundtrack recording with Gladys Knight called “Loving On Borrowed Time” from the Sylvester Stallone flick Cobra. Both were duds. But, because I can, here’s that song, which really wasn’t so bad even though barely anyone heard it. Here’s your one chance.

But now back to our main attraction. The soundtrack album to Dirty Dancing was also the best-selling Pop album this week in ‘87 (its third survey-cycle to clinch the top) and would sit atop the Pop Albums chart for 18 non-consecutive weeks beginning two weeks ago (in ’87) and finishing its interrupted string in the top spot in May of 1988! The only two albums that knocked the soundtrack from the head of the pack was Tiffany from the 17 year-old singer Tiffany Renee Darwish, plus the album Faith from George Michael. Another film song written by Previte and DeNicola called “Hungry Eyes” became a hit from the soundtrack for one-time Raspberries member Eric Carmen, reaching number four on the Hot 100 Pop list in early 1988 and No. 2 on the Adult-Contemporary singles chart that year. A third hit single from the soundtrack was released by co-star Patrick Swayze, who co-wrote the tune “She’s Like The Wind” with songwriter Stacy Widelitz; originally written for a film called Grandview, U.S.A.; which also starred Swayze, but never used. Other former hit songs on the soundtrack were from the ‘period’ of the Dirty Dancing flick, including: “Be My Baby” by the Ronettes, “Stay” by Maurice Williams & the Zodiacs, “Hey Baby” by Bruce Channel, “Love Is Strange” from Mickey & Sylvia and (“I Remember) In The Still Of The Night” by the Five Satins. The song “Do You Love Me” by the Contours got a third-time entry on the Hot 100 as a result of it being performed in the movie and was included on yet another album called More Dirty Dancing: More Original Music from the Hit Motion Picture also on RCA Records.

 

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert. 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

All content on this page is copyright Big Jay Sorensen and of its respective copyright owners.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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