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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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October 16th, 2015
 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 21, 1967

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

**********************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 13)

“YOUR PRECIOUS LOVE”

(Valerie Simpson / Nicholas Ashford)

Produced by: HARVEY FUQUA & JOHNNY BRISTOL

MARVIN GAYE & TAMMI TERRELL

TAMLA Records  54156

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 9)

“GIMME LITTLE SIGN”

(Alfred Smith / Joseph Hooven / Jerry Winn)

Promotion In Motion: IRWIN ZUCKER

BRENTON WOOD

PHILIPS Records  40393

******************************

No. 8 (LW 4)

“LITTLE OLE MAN (Uptight-Everything’s Alright)”

(Sylvia Moy / Henry Cosby / Stevie Wonder / Bill Cosby)

Produced by: FRED SMITH

Arranged by: JAMES CARMICHAEL

BILL COSBY

WARNER BROS. Records  7072

******************************

No. 7  (LW 10)

“SOUL MAN”

(Isaac Hayes / Dave Porter)

Produced by: ISAAC HAYES & DAVE PORTER

SAM & DAVE

STAX Records  231

******************************

No. 6  (LW 24)

“IT MUST BE HIM”

(Gilbert Becaud / Mack David)

Produced by: DAVID PELL

Arranged by: ERNIE FREEMAN

VICKKI CARR

LIBERTY Records  55917

******************************

No. 5  (LW 15)

“EXPRESSWAY TO YOUR HEART”

(Kenny Gamble / Leon Huff)

Produced by: KENNY GAMBLE & LEON HUFF

SOUL SURVIVORS

CRIMSON Records  1010

******************************

No. 4  (LW 8)

“HOW CAN I BE SURE”

(Felix Cavaliere / Eddie Brigati)

Produced by: FELIX CAVALIERI, EDDIE BRIGATI, GENE CORNISH & DINO DANELLI

Arranged by: ARIF MARDIN

Engineered by: TOM DOWD

THE YOUNG RASCALS

ATLANTIC Records  2438

******************************

No. 3  (LW 2)

“NEVER MY LOVE”

(Don Addrisi / Dick Addrisi)

      Produced by: BONES HOWE

THE ASSOCIATION

WARNER BROS. Records  428

******************************

No. 2  (LW 1)

“THE LETTER”

(Wayne Carson)

Produced by: DAN PENN

THE BOX TOPS

MALA Records 565

******************************

 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“TO SIR WITH LOVE”



(Don Black / Mark London)

 

Flip-Side:

“THE BOAT THAT I ROW”

(Neil Diamond)

 

LULU

 

EPIC Records10187

 

Produced by: MICKIE MOST

Sitting at the zenith of the Hot 100 Single chart this week in ’67 was Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie—better known as Lulu—with “To Sir With Love.” This, of course, was the title track from the motion-picture co-starring her and Sidney Portier. During this survey-installment, “To Sir With Love” was in the first of a concluding five weeks as the leading hit 45 RPM in America. In addition, according to Billboard Magazine, this Epic Records 45 RPM release was the biggest Pop hit of 1967, notwithstanding “I’m A Believe” by the Monkees having more weeks in the No. 1 slot that year. So where did she get the name Lulu? The perpetual blonde hails from Dennistoun, Scotland, and the singer began performing in her native kingdom at a young age, becoming a component of a local rock & roll band at the age of 13. Two years later, she signed with Decca Records and was renamed as Lulu; and with her newly named band, the Luvers (at the suggestion of her long-time manager Marion Massey) they almost instantly had a British hit re-make of the Isley Brothers’ smash R&B hit, ‘Shout.” The single barely made a blip on the radar here in the colonies, only reaching No. 94 and on the Hot 100 for just three weeks. It was re-released after “To Sir With Love” was a smash; and again, the second time to little detection. It was the song from the film that brought her global fame was the title track from the flick, To Sir With Love. Lulu originally grabbed a bit part in the flick, but highly awed the film’s director James Clavell during early takes. He then re-worked the script and planted Lulu into a more prominent role; giving her the chance to sing the closing segment song, “To Sir With Love”—where she dances with her teacher. The song was composed by Mark London with lyrics by Don Black.

The film edition of the tune has an additional verse that was edited-out for the single release. And interestingly, the smash U.S. hit song was the B side to a record called “Let’s Pretend” in the U.K. and was not a big hit in Blighty. The North American B side was “The Boat That I Row” and bubbled-under the Hot 100 at a peak slot of No. 115. Lulu married Maurice Gibb of the Bee Gees in early 1969 (they divorced in ’74) just before she won the Eurovision competition with a song called “Boom Bang-A-Bang”—a No. 2 hit in the U.K.; but one that never attained a slot on the Hot 100 here. Her American recording career never repeated her early success; but in the opinion of your Big Jay, her 1969 Atco Records release, “Oh Me Oh My (I’m A Fool For You Baby)” recorded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, is her crowning moment musically. It’s female blue-eyed Soul at its finest. Though the song reached only No. 22 on the Hot 100, it was hand-crafted to flawlessness by the Atlantic/Atco Records production team of arranger Arif Mardin with producers Jerry Wexler and Tom Dowd. It came from an album called New Routes which featured the guitar playing of Duane Allman. And because I can, I present this record to you. Give it a close listen.

I know—the Queen of Soul had a version. And it’s great. But, if you’ve never heard Lulu’s interpretation until now, I’d love to hear what you think. Write to me anytime at  BigJaySorensen@gmail.com. Lulu had one more Top 20 U.S. hit in 1981 (No. 18 Pop) called “I Could Never Miss You (More Than I Do) which wasn’t a bad record either.

 

 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

 

No.1

 

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“IT MUST BE HIM”



(Gilbert Becaud / Mack David)

 

Flip-Side:

“THAT’S ALL”

 

VICKKI CARR

 

LIBERTY Records  55917

 

Produced by: DAVID PELL

 

Arranged by: ERNIE FREEMAN

 

Born in El Paso, Texas, Vikki Carr’s real name is Florencia Bisenta de Casillas Martinez Cardona, and had major success singing Spanish songs later her career. But early on, she scored with Easy Listening (or Middle-of-the-Road) audiences with “It Must Be Him” that reached No. 3 on the Hot 100; in that slot for two weeks. The 45 RPM was No. 1 on the Top 40 Easy Listening special survey during this seven-day chronicle-period; the first of three weeks at the summit of this special survey. Her recording made some very impressive leaps up the Hot 100 as well; this week moving from No. 24 to No. 6. Some of you Middle-of-the-Road fans may recall that Vicki Carr was a regular on trumpet player and band-leader’s Ray Anthony Show on ABC Television. He had many shows on TV during the medium’s early years; and was a radio star back in the ‘40s, as well as a popular recording artist. Carr had a brief foray into Rock & Roll just before the Ray Anthony Show re-debuted in ’63. It should be noted, that in 1962, producer Phil Spector overhead Vicki recording a song written by Gene Pitney called “He’s A Rebel.” Spector must have realized it was a hit song, so he hastily did a cover version with what was listed as by the Crystals. That vocal group was out on tour and couldn’t get back to the recording studio in time; so he utilized the talents of Darlene Love & the Blossoms on the track, along with the now infamous “Wrecking Crew”—L.A.’s crack studio cats who helped Spector make his “Wall of Sound.” Nobody knew until years later when Darlene made noise. But Spector’s production approach instantly blew Carr’s version out of the water. Just for a hoot, here’s Vicki’s original recording of “He’s A Rebel” before we get to this week’s featured Easy Listening record.

Did you know the Shirelles turned-down the offer to record Pitney’s composition before Vicki Carr got a hold of it? Ya do now. But while Carr’s version of “He’s A Rebel” wasn’t bad, it didn’t have that certain “thing” that Darlene Love had, in addition to the “Wall-of-Sound” that Spector possessed as his secret weapon. But now back to our story of “It Must Be Him.” The “Original French title of this song was “Seul Sur Son Étoile” with lyrics by Maurice Vidalin. So, Mack David (Hal’s older brother) wrote English lyrics to the Gilbert Becaud melody, and faire sauter à la dynamite; an explosively emotional hit.

Vicki Carr’s biggest success as a singer was in the Spanish language marketplace; especially during the ‘80s and ‘90s. As late at 1993, Carr had a two-month chart-topping single on the Latin Singles chart. Vicki Carr won Grammy© Awards for Best Mexican-American Performance and Best Latin Pop Album. She has recorded dozens of albums from 1963 through the present. Her album, also titled, It Must Be Him, debuted on the Top LPs chart this week at No. 198; ultimately garnering the peak position of No. 12 on Liberty Records. Carr was even once a guest host on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson when he had one of his many days off.    

 

TOP SELLING R&B

 SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

 

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

“SOUL MAN”

 

SAM & DAVE

 

(Isaac Hayes / David Porter)

 

Flip-Side:

“MAY I BABY”

 

Produced by:

 

ISAAC HAYES & DAVE PORTER

 

STAX RECORDS – 231

 

While “Soul Man” was getting ready to reach its peak position on the Hot 100 at No. 2 for the week-ending on November 11, 1967, at the same time it was the foremost 45 RPM on the Top Selling R&B Singles chart as well. And this was the second week at the pinnacle position on this chart. During THIS survey-cycle on the Hot 100, “Soul Man” was climbing rapidly up the ladder at No. 7. The Stax Records Memphis machine  was well-oiled when this record hit the 45 RPM record racks; featuring the backing band Booker T. & the M.G’s featuring Duck Dunn on bass, Al “The Human Metronome” Jackson and guitarist Steve Cropper—“play it Steve.” “Soul Man” was conceived by Isaac Hayes along with his then songwriting partner David Porter. Hayes had watched a TV account of the race riots in Detroit in 1967, with the word “soul” painted on buildings owned by Blacks; thus sparing them from destruction. That word stuck with him as a symbol for pride, and that turned into the song featuring Sam Moore and Dave Prater. Here are Sam & Dave in a live setting with this magnificent slice of Soul.

Let it be known that Sam & Dave didn’t get along; better yet, they hated each other. They used to enter the stage from opposite sides, due to their thorny association. They also never harmonized, as Prater wasn’t very good at it. At the time of his death in 1988 (due to a car accident in Georgia) Prater had been a resident of the Passaic County, NJ city of Patterson. Sam Moore (born Samuel Hicks) is still performing. The act Sam & Dave (the original Sam and not another “Sam” that Prater legally used for touring toward the end of his life) were inducted into the class of ’92 for the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. They’re also in the Vocal Group Hall of Fame. “Soul Man” won a Grammy® for Best Rhythm & Blues Group Performance in ‘67. The song “Soul Man” was put into the Grammy® Hall of Fame in 1999 and was certainly helped by the remake hit performance (No. 14 Pop) from late 1978 of the Blues Brothers. Both Dunn and Cropper of Booker T. & the M.G.’s performed in that band as well; led by Paul Shaffer.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 21, 1967

 

TOP

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

 

No. 1

 

Pop

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

ODE TO BILLY JOE

 

 

 

 

BOBBIE GENTRY

 

 

CAPITOL RECORDS – 2830

Mono & Stereo

 

 

Produced by:

 

KELLY GORDON

 

Arranged and Conducted by:

 

JIMMIE HASKELL

 

Here’s something to stump your Big Jay’s Record Pig Music Trivia © fans. What album replaced the Beatles masterpiece Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band as the biggest LP in America on the Billboard Top LPs chart in 1967? The answer is: Bobbie Gentry’s Ode To Billy Joe album. The original Tallahatchie Bridge buckled just a few years after being depicted in the made-up story "Ode To Billy Joe" by Country singer Bobbie Gentry. Well, the bridge (that fictitious character Billy Joe McAllister jumped off) on this week's No. 1 LP, was genuine, and it crossed the Tallahatchie River in a small unincorporated town called Money, Mississippi. The bridge was replaced after it fell into the river in 1972. It was built nearby, but they renamed it the Sanders-Hooper Bridge. Gee, I wonder why? So just what WAS thrown off the bridge in the song by the girl and Billy Joe? What WHY did the character Billy Joe McAllister leap off the bridge after that episode? Bobbie Gentry (real name Roberta Lee Streeter) maintains she knows what was thrown off the bridge, but she remains tight-lipped. She continues to say even she doesn't know why the guy jumped. Bobbie Gentry maintains the song itself was about the relationship of a family unit that can't come to grips with death and specifically, suicide (in effect, ignoring it) and the pitiful dealings between the song's narrator and her mother. A film version of the story in the song came out in 1976, taking many liberties in the interpretation of the narrative; written and directed by none-other than "Jethro" from TV's The Beverly Hillbillies, Max Baer, Jr. which was quite rewarding financially for Gentry. I've read reports that initially, there was an even longer version of the song. Capitol Records had it edited down to 4:14 in order to leave the listener wondering just what the heck truly went down on the third of June—a sleepy dusty delta day—near the Choctaw Ridge; with the storyteller picking flowers to throw into the muddy water. And interestingly, the song was originally thought by the record company as a B side of the tune "Mississippi Delta," the ultimate flip-side of the 45 RPM.

There were no other hits from this LP to reach the Hot 100; although the B side of the 45 RPM release of “Ode To Billy Joe” was called “Mississippi Delta.” Gentry won three Grammy® Awards for '67, including: Best New Artist, Best Vocal Performance, Female and Best Contemporary Female Solo Performance. Celebrated arranger Jimmy Haskell won a Grammy® for Arranger of the Year, for his simple two violins and four cellos orchestration added to Bobbie Gentry's unaccompanied acoustic guitar track. Incongruously, the song resonated more with the wide Pop audience, and only attained the No. 17 peak position on the Hot Country Singles catalog. This week was the second and final survey-phase for the album Ode To Billy Joe as the nation's biggest Long Player release on Capitol Records. The single was continuing its tumble down the Hot 100 chart after a long ride at that chart’s peak; this week at No. 14. Here’s another Big Jay's Record Pig Music Trivia© question you can try on your music-loving friends. What record replaced the ‘60s anthem “All You Need Is Love” on the Hot 100 Singles chart? Yep. Gentry's single replaced the Beatles one-week No. 1 45 RPM “All You Need Is Love” on that listing back in August of ’67—better known as the “Summer of Love.” Not many artists can say they topped the Beatles twice in the same year! But Gentry was never able to crack the Top 25 again on the Hot 100 Pop Singles chart. She did have 12 entries on that list over the course of nine years. Two of those were duets with Glen Campbell. And when the Robby Benson film came out in ’76, Gentry re-recorded her monster hit. This time it crash-landed harder than whatever it was that was tossed off that bridge—only reaching No. 65 the second time around. It don’t make a lick of sense. 

 

TOP SELLING R&B

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

 

No. 1

 

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

DIANA ROSS & THE SUPREMES GREATEST HITS

 

 

DIANA ROSS & THE SUPREMES

 

 

MOTOWN RECORDS2-663

 

Produced by:

 

BRIAN HOLLAND & LAMONT DOZIER

The last album released by the Supremes came out on May 27, 1967. As a unit, that last LP was The Supremes Sing Rodgers & Hart. The act’s name changed to Diana Ross & the Supremes with the release of this week’s No. 1 R&B album in America on Motown Records. The gate-fold double album would also become the biggest LP in the land next week on the Pop Top LP’s chart; staying there for five total survey-phases. But perhaps more tellingly, this week was the third of an eventual 12 back-to-back survey-periods as the biggest R&B LP in America. Motown kept the group’s latest 45 RPM release, “Reflections,” for a future album inclusion (**see below) but the NAME of the vocal group had already changed by the time of that 45’s release earlier in 1967. The moniker was officially altered in late June of ’67; surprising both Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard, co-founding members. This No. 1 double album set called Diana Ross & The Supremes: Greatest Hits, featured almost all of their hit singles (to date) and a couple of superb 45 ‘B’ sides. This set is sometimes called Diana Ross & the Supremes: Greatest Hits, Vols. 1 & 2—because there was a Greatest Hits, Vol. 3 released in 1969. “Reflections” was the first 45 featuring the new name released on July 27, 1967. But this week’s No. 1 on the Best Selling R&B LP’s listing was the album to have that marquee; released on August 29, 1967. It featured, “The Happening”—the newest song placed on this set—and the LAST song released as the Supremes on a 45 for a few years.

Motown held back the group’s newest single, “Reflections” for a future album of the same name, which was released on March 25, 1968. Another Big Jay fave that was used on this album was yet another Holland-Dozier-Holland mini-masterpiece called “There’s No Stopping Us Now.” It was the B side of the No. 1 single “Love Is Here And Now You’re Gone.” Because I can, here is that magnificent B side.

This name change for the leading act in the Motown roster happened during a tumultuous time for the group, as founding member Florence Ballard was terminated (or asked to leave) after she turned up drunk and slovenly (according to Berry Gordy, Jr.) and was replaced temporarily by a singer named Marlene Barrow from the Motown backing group the Andantes. As early at 1966, Gordy was even considering Motown singer Barbara McNair to replace Flo. Gordy then had intended that Cindy Birdsong from the group the Bluebelles (of Patti LaBelle-fame) would eventually join the Supremes once her contract was ready to be purchased from her label. After leaving the Supremes, Ballard had a rough time, but seemed poised for a comeback when she died suddenly at a Detroit hospital on February 22, 1976 of coronary thrombosis according to the autopsy. But family members believe she did not die of those causes and may have been murdered—silenced to keep quiet as she was about to write a biography telling all. We’ll likely never know if that’s true. By the way, the first Supremes album without Ms. Ross was called Right On, featuring new lead singer Jean Terrell, Cindy Birdsong and original member Mary Wilson released on April 26, 1970 on Motown Records. That album featured “Up The Ladder To The Roof” (No. 10 Pop) and the largely forgotten “Everybody’s Got The Right To Love” reaching only No. 21. Their next hit was the last Top 10 Pop hit for the group (No. 7 Pop & No. 1 Soul) “Stoned Love.”

 

 

 

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 19, 1974

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 17)

“LOVE ME FOR A REASON”

(Johnny Bristol / Wade Brown / Dave Jones, Jr.)

Produced by: MIKE CURB PRODUCTIONS

Arranged by: HIDLE BROWN “H. B.” Barnum

THE OSMONDS

MGM / KOLOB Records  14746

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 11)

“STEPPIN’ OUT (Gonna Boogie Tonight)”

(L. Russel Brown / Irwin Levine)

Produced by: HANK MEDRESS & DAVE APPELL for MEDRESS & APPELL Productions, Inc.

TONY ORLANDO and DAWN

BELL Records  45-601

******************************

No. 8 (LW 10)

“CAN’T GET ENOUGH”

(Mick Ralphs)

Produced by: BAD COMPANY—MICK RALPHS, PAUL ROGERS, RAMOND “BOZ” BURRELL & SIMON KIRKE

BAD COMPANY

SWAN SONG Records  70015

******************************

No. 7  (LW 8)

“NEVER MY LOVE”

(Don Addrisi / Richard Addrisi)

Produced by: BENGT PALMERS

Recorded in Sweden

BLUE SWEDE

EMI Records  3938

******************************

No. 6  (LW 7)

“THE BITCH IS BACK”

(Elton John / Bernie Taupin)

Produced by: GUS DUDGEON

ELTON JOHN

MCA Records  40297

******************************

No. 5  (LW 15)

“JAZZMAN”

(Carole King / Dave Palmer)

Produced by: LOU ADLER

Engineered by: NORM KINNEY

CAROLE KING

ODE Records – 66101

******************************

No. 4  (LW 5)

“HIGHER GROUND”

(Stevie Wonder)

Produced & Arranged by: STEVIE WONDER

STEVIE WONDER

TAMLA Records  54235F

******************************

 

No. 3  (LW 5)

“YOU HAVEN’T DONE NOTHIN”

(Stevie Wonder)

Produced and Arranged by: STEVIE WONDER

STEVIE WONDER

“Doo Doo Wopssss” by the Jackson 5

TAMLA Records  54252F

******************************

No. 2  (LW 3)

“THEN CAME YOU”

(Sherman Marshall / Phil Pugh)

Produced, Arranged & Conducted by: THOM BELL

DIONNE WARWICKE AND SPINNERS

ATLANTIC Records  3029 re-released as 3202

******************************



 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 2)

 
“NOTHING FROM NOTHING”



(Billy Preston / Bruce Fisher)

 

 

BILLY PRESTON

 

A&M Records1544

 

Produced by:

 

BILLY PRESTON

 

 

 

Here’s something you may have forgotten. Billy Preston was the very first musical guest on debut program of Saturday Night Live from 30 Rock. He sang this week’s No. 1 song in the nation, “Nothing From Nothing” on A&M Records; on top of the Hot 100 for this sole survey-sequence in ’74. In fact, here’s that very performance on Oct. 11, 1974 in an abbreviated clip from that historic TV night.

Billy Preston was a child prodigy on keyboards. He performed with celebrated Gospel singer Mahalia Jackson as a 10 year-old child! The following year Billy sang on the Nat King Cole Show TV show and sang “Blueberry Hill” with the star. Preston musts have impressed Cole, because at the age of 12, Billy performed in the film St. Louis Blues, another Nat King Cole project, as a young W. C. Handy. That film also starred Eartha Kitt, Ella Fitzgerald, Cab Calloway, Mahalia Jackson and Ruby Dee, among others. Preston was well regarded and began working as a backing musician for Little Richard. It was during a tour of Germany that Preston met the Beatles while they both performed in Hamburg. Little was thought of that meeting then, but they’d combine for one of the biggest hits by the Beatles just seven years later. Preston played on TV’s Shindig as one of the musicians backing other artists in the mid-‘60s. He joined Ray Charles’ band for awhile, and also performed on many hit songs for artists as diverse as Sly & the Family Stone and the Rolling Stones. His shining historic moment occurred when Billy was invited by George Harrison to play along with the boys during sessions for what became the Let It Be album. He was initially asked to play to try to break the tension that was festering around the group in early 1969. Later that summer, “Get Back” backed-with “Don’t Let Me Down” were released as a single, as the Beatles WITH Billy Preston. He’s the only person to have that designation. And I have my copy of “Get Back” signed by Preston. He appeared on the Joey Reynolds Show on 66 WNNNBC, where I was Joey’s sidekick. Billy began playing “Nothing From Nothing” on the in-studio piano, and of course your Big Jay sang background vocals and banged the drum beats right along with the rest of the cast of characters in the studio, co-incidentally in the same building that he performed the song as the first guest on Saturday Night Live 12 years prior. Preston stayed friendly with George Harrison, and was signed to the Beatles’ Apple Records for a short time. He later graced the stage at Madison Square Garden for the Concert For Bangla Desh along with many other superstars. Preston had four million-selling singles: “Outa-Space” (No. 2 Pop & No. 1 R&B and a Grammy® winner for Pop Instrumental) in ’72, “Will It Go Round In Circles” (No. 1 Pop) “Space Race” (No. 4 Pop & No. 1 Soul) another instrumental in ’73 and this week’s No. 1 record, “Nothing From Nothing,” taken from his then current album The Kids & Me, No. 27 and climbing up the Top LPs & Tape chart, and No. 32 on the Hot Soul LPs chart. The song was on the way down on the Hot Soul Singles listing, currently at No. 40, down from No. 30 after peaking a few weeks prior. The song had also been on top of the other two major national charts; Cashbox and Record World.  Here’s the entire song “Nothing From Nothing” lip-synced on TV’s Soul Train; complete with a very uncomfortable interview.

Preston’s other major hit was with the duet “With You I’m Born Again” (No. 4 Pop) with singer Syreeta used in the film Fast Break starring comedian Gabe Kaplan in ’79. Preston also co-wrote “You Are So Beautiful” with his songwriting partner Bruce Fisher, later a major hit for Joe Cocker. Preston’s life began to spiral out of control by the late ‘80s into the early ‘90s, when he was taken into custody and convicted of insurance fraud. In addition, he was treated for alcohol and cocaine additions; plus, he was also arrested for criminally having relations with a 16 year-old boy. He entered no-contest pleas and served under house arrest ordered to enter rehab. After those incidents, Billy once again toured with major stars including Eric Clapton and others. After George Harrison died in 2001, Preston performed at the Royal Albert Hall at the Concert For George. Billy became ill with failing kidneys, getting transplanted organs, yet returned to   performing. His final appearance was at the opening for the re-release of the film Concert For Bangla Desh in 2005, after which Preston’s continuing kidney disease, brought on by hypertension, ended his musical career. Once again he went into drug rehab but slipped into a coma while there in late 2005. He never recovered and died on June 6, 2006.     

 

 

TOP 50

EASY LISTENING

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

 

No.1

 

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“CAREFREE HIGHWAY”

 

(Gordon Lightfoot)

 

Flip-Side:

“SEVEN ISLAND SUITE”

 

GORDON LIGHTFOOT

 

REPRISE Records  1309

 

Produced by:

 

LENNY WARONKER

 

 

Strings Arranged by:

 

NICK DeCARO

 


Engineered by:

 

LEE HERSCHBERG

 

 

Gordon Lightfoot will be 77 years-old in early November, but he still performs his brand of easy folk/rock songs in concerts all over the world. So just where is this “Carefree Highway” anyway? It is actually Rt. 74 in Arizona, just north of Phoenix. While on this stretch of road in the early ‘70s, Lightfoot wrote down the name of the highway and slept on it—for about eight months; then turned it into a song. The “Ann” in the song was a woman he once had a relationship; ending with Gordon being dumped. “Carefree Highway” was the No. 1 song on the Top 50 Easy Listening Singles chart this week in ’74 for just this one survey-period. The 45 RPM release was No. 22 this week and climbing up the Hot 100 Singles chart; ending up peaking at No. 10 in a few weeks on that chronicle of hits.


Gordon Lightfoot, born in Orillia, Ontario, Canada, began his career as a singer in 1961. But it wasn’t until ’65 that he was able to gain a recording contract. His first album simply called Lightfoot appeared in ’66. Four years later, Gordon Lightfoot had a major hit song, “If You Could Read My Mind,” peaking at No. 5 in early 1970. That song set the tone for his easy-going love songs and other tomes. One of my favorite songs from his early days of hit-making was called “Beautiful” (No. 58 Pop) on Reprise Records in ’74. I am going to feature it here, as you’ve likely not heard of it, or perhaps forgot about the song. This is a beautiful piece of music.

Lightfoot had the biggest hit of his career two years later in ’74 with his only million-selling 45 RPM, “Sundown.” “Carefree Highway” was the follow-up single from the LP called Sundown. Other hits for Lightfoot included: “Rainy Day People” (No 26 Pop but No. 1 Easy Listening) his second biggest hit, “The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald” (No. 2 Pop) in 76, and one more Top 40 hit, the wonderful song “The Circle Is Small (I Can See It In Your Eyes” (No. 33 Pop) in ’78. He failed to have further hits in the U.S. Tragedy struck Gordon Lightfoot in 2002, as he suffered a near-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (much like the situation that took the life of comic actor John Ritter in 2003) left Lightfoot in a coma for five weeks and restricted to a bed for three months. He has stated it almost killed him, and he couldn’t perform for 2 _ years. He was bestowed the honor of Companion of the Order of Canada, which is their highest non-military honor, and recently was given the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Gordon Lightfoot is also one of the fewer than 400 people in the Songwriters Hall of Fame.  

 

HOT

SOUL

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

 

No.1

 

R&B (SOUL)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“DO IT

(‘Til You’re Satisfied)”

 

 

(Billy Nichols)

 

Flip-Side:

DISCO REMIX by TOM MOULTON of “DO IT (‘TIL YOU’RE SATISFIED)”

 

 

B.T. EXPRESS

 

SCEPTOR Records  12395

 

 

 

Produced by:

 

JEFF “DOC” LANE and DOCK PRODUCTIONS for “O” PRODUCTIONS, Inc.

 

Strings Arranged by:

 

TRADE MARTIN

 

They were almost called Madison Street Express, suggested by execs at Scepter Records, but they settled on Brooklyn Transit Express, which was quickly shortened to B. T. Express. The band had their first of two million-selling crossover smashes during this survey-cycle called "Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)" the No. 1 Soul 45 RPM in the land for this sole week on a very competitive chart. The single was a fast-riser on the Pop side too, as after just four weeks on the Hot 100, this single on Scepter Records was already at No. 24; heading for a peak of No. 2 for two weeks. Here is B.T. Express on TV’s Soul Train in ’74.

The Disco Remixes on their first LP were done by the great “Father of the Disco Mix,” Tom Moulton. The band B.T. Express consisted of Barbara Joyce Lomas on vocals, Louis Risbrook (vocals & bass) with his brother Bill (saxophone) Carlos Ward (flute) Richard Thompson (guitar) and Dennis Rowe (congas) and drummer Terrell Wood. A studio cat named Sam Taylor provided the organ sounds on the song “Do It (‘Til You’re Satisfied.)” Their album also called Do It ('Til You're Satisfied) was also a big crossover, as it gained the peak position of No. 2 on the Top LPs list and No. 1 on the Soul LPs chart later in 1975 due to the strength of their second single from the album, “Express” (No. 4 Pop & No. 1 Soul) another million-selling 45 RPM release. Their next hit was called “Give It What You Got” a huge Disco hit in NYC (No. 40 Pop) quickly followed-up by the B side “Peace Pipe” (No. 31 Pop) in the late summer of ’75. Those tracks came from the LP called Non-Stop; also a No. 1 Soul LP chart hit. After the demise of Scepter Records, B. T. Express signed a deal with Columbia Records, but couldn't regain their groove, as their last Pop chart record only got to No. 52 called “Can't Stop Groovin' Now, Wanna Do It Some More.” While with Columbia Records, they did have a couple of decent albums landing on the Soul LPs chart; but little Pop success. A later alumnus of the band went on to solo fame. Keyboard player Michael Jones was renamed Kashif and became a techno-funk singer, songwriter and producer.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 19, 1974

 

TOP

LPs & TAPE 

 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

 

No. 1

 

Pop

LP

 

(Last Week No. 9)

 

NOT FRAGILE

 

 

 

 

BACHMAN- TURNER OVERDRIVE

 

MERCURY Records  1004

 

Produced by:

 

 

RANDY BACHMAN

 

What Billboard Hot 100 1974 No. 1 record was not intended to be released at all, as it was a joke intended only for the writer’s stuttering brother? “You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” by Bachman-Turner Overdrive. Not only did that song become a No. 1 Hot 100 chart topper, the album it came from, Not Fragile, was sitting at the pinnacle of the Top LPs & Tape listing for this sole week in ’74. The band was originally called Brave Belt, formed after Randy Bachman had left the very popular group the Guess Who. He and former Guess Who singer (on their early recordings) Chad Allan were founding members of that new band Brave Belt. Allan left after their second album failed to ignite any interest. Lead guitarist (classically trained) Randy Bachman brought in his brother Robbie Bachman on drums along with C.F. Turner on vocals and bass plus two other guitarists, another brother Tim Bachman and Blair Thornton. An exec at Mercury Records had a conversation with Randy Bachman, saying if he had a new demo tape, he’d listen to it. He did, but the Mercury Records guy had been out of the country and the tapes piled up. He dumped them all into a big garbage pail, and only one hit the floor. They were still called Brave Belt at this point, but when they were signed by Mercury, they thought the band needed a new moniker. That tape that landed on the ground was the demo for what became known as Bachman-Turner Overdrive. The “Overdrive” came from a trucking magazine of the same name. That LP featured a lowly charting hit (No. 68 Pop) in the U.S. called “Blue Collar.” The next album was called appropriately Bachman-Turner Overdrive II and contained the group’s breakout hits, “Let It Ride” (No. 23 Pop) and “Takin’ Care Of Business” (No. 12 Pop) in early ’74. Another brother Tim Bachman was initially in the band, but left after the second LP (kicked out) as the band had a strict rule about no drugs, drinking or sex on the road. Reportedly, he broke all three rules. Mercury knew what they had in the band by this point and their third album was named Not Fragile (a not so subtle dig on the Yes album called Fragile) containing the No. 1 Hot 100 single “You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” backed with another charting song “Free Wheeling” dedicated to the late guitarist Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers, who was killed in a motorcycle crash in 1971. “You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” would become the No. 1 song in the U.S.A.—two weeks down the highway from this survey-phase in ’74. This week it was at No. 17 and climbing rapidly. Here’s a live version of the song, sung by Bachman, who usually didn’t sing lead. That chore was left to C.F. Turner on most occasions. 

The genesis of “You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” happened when Randy Bachman (the song’s composer) was fooling around with some rhythm guitar sounds along the lines of Dave Mason’s work; then, just an instrumental. Bachman added the stuttering later as a gift intended for his other brother Gary. Mercury Records company execs didn’t recognize a standout hit from this album when they reviewed for release, and asked for more material. Randy Bachman reluctantly let them hear this song—and the rest is No. 1 history. Another single from Not Fragile was a decent sized rocker and certainly not a fragile-sounding track called “Roll On Down The Highway” (No. 14 Pop) in early ’75. Minor hits followed, including their last Top 20 U.S. hit, “Hey You” only reached No. 21. Litigation has prevented a full-blown Bachman-Turner Overdrive reunion, as other members own the licensing of the name. So Randy Bachman and C. F. Turner (the group’s namesakes) have toured under another name. B.T.O. (as they are often called) is in the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and they have won numerous Juno® Awards in their native Canada.

 

SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

 

No. 1

 

 

R&B

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

FULLFILLINGNESS’ FIRST FINALE

 

 

 

STEVIE WONDER

 

TAMLA Records  6-332

 

Written, Produced & Arranged by:

 

STEVIE WONDER

 

This was Stevie Wonder’s breath-taking ventures and his first Pop Top LPs & Tape No. 1 album for two weeks, back in September of ’74. However, Fullfillingness’ First Finale was in the No. 1 slot this week on the Hot Soul LPs chart; the third of an ultimate eight non-successive survey-periods in the top slot. In two weeks from this song appraisal-cycle, his 45 RPM release “You Haven’t Done Nothing” would reach the crest of the Hot 100 Singles chart, and then nose-dive to No. 12 the following week; one of the fastest dropping No. 1 songs of all time on this chronicle. The song had just exited the No. 1 spot after two weeks on the Hot Soul Singles register. The song was overtly anti-Richard Nixon and the U.S. government in general. So much so, that Wonder nearly moved to Africa as a political statement. He thought better and stayed in the U.S.—warts and all. “You Haven’t Done Nothin’” was written earlier in ’74 and was on Wonder’s LP timely released on July 22, 1974, less than three weeks before Nixon resigned on August 9, 1974 as a result of assured impeachment and expulsion from office. The single’s official release date was two days before Nixon gave up power and Gerald Ford moved into the White House. Featuring the so-called “Doo Doo Wopssss” of the Jackson 5, here is “You Haven’t Done Nothin.”

It’s almost certain Stevie Wonder’s song didn’t cause “Tricky Dicky” from jumping on that helicopter that hot August day with victory signs flashing from both of his hands, but the song was symbolic none the less. The next single from the album Fullfillingness’ First Finale was pure Stevie, as other than conga player Richard Dzidzornu, Wonder played every other instrument including drums, Moog bass, harmonica, Fender Rhodes and piano on “Boogie On Reggae Woman.”


That song peaked at No. 3 on the Pop chart in early February of ’75. Both singles from the LP reached No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles chart. Fullfillingness’ First Finale won Grammy® Awards for Album of the Year, Best Male Pop Vocal and Best Male Rhythm & Blues Vocal Performance for “Boogie On Reggae Woman.”

 

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 23, 1982

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

 


THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 5)

“ABRACADABRA”

(Steve Miller)

Produced by: STEVE MILLER and GARY MALLABER

Under license from SAILOR RECORDS

THE STEVE MILLER BAND

CAPITOL Records 5126

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 10)

“I RAN (So Far Away)”

(Ali Score / Paul Reynolds / Mike Score / Frank Maudsley)

Produced by: MIKE HOWLETT

Engineered by: Ron Saint Germain, Compass Point, Nassau

A FLOCK OF SEAGULLS

JIVE Records  102

******************************

No. 8 (LW 8)

“YOU CAN DO MAGIC”

(Russ Ballard)

Produced by: RUSS BALLARD for RUJO Productions

AMERICA

CAPITOL Records  5412

******************************

No. 7  (LW 7)

“SOMEBODY’S BABY”

From the Soundtrack Album “Fast Times At Ridgemont High” Music from the Motion Picture

(Jackson Browne / Danny Kortchmar)

Produced by: JACKSON BROWNE

JACKSON BROWNE

ASYLUM Records  69982

******************************

No. 6  (LW 9)

“HEART ATTACK”

(Steve Kipner / Paul Bliss)

Produced by: JOHN FARRAR

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN

MCA Records  52100

******************************

No. 5  (LW 11)

“UP WHERE WE BELONG”

Love Theme from the Paramount Film “An Officer And A Gentleman”

(Jack Nitzsche / Will Jennings / Buffy Sainte Marie)

Produced by: STEWART LEVINE

JOE COCKER AND JENNIFER WARNES

ISLAND Records – 99996

******************************

No. 4  (LW 6)

“I KEEP FORGETTIN’ (Every Time You’re Near)”

(Jerry Lieber / Mike Stoller / Michael McDonald / Ed Sanford)

Produced by: TED TEMPLEMAN & LENNY WARONKER

Engineered by: DONN LANDEE

MICHAEL McDONALD

WARNER BROS. Records  29933

******************************

 

No. 3  (LW 3)

“EYE IN THE SKY”

(Eric Woolfson / Alan Parsons)

Produced and Engineered by: ALAN PARSONS

Executive Producer: Eric Woolfson

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT

ARISTA Records  0696

******************************

No. 2  (LW 2)

“WHO CAN IT BE NOW”

(Colin Hay)

Produced by: PETER McLAN

MEN AT WORK

COLUMBIA Records  02888

******************************



 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 
“JACK & DIANE”



(John Cougar Mellencamp)

 

 

JOHN COUGAR

 

RIVA Records210

 

Produced by:

 

JOHN COUGAR MELLENCAMP and JOHN GEHMAN

 

 

“Jack & Diane”—from the still called John Cougar—was in the last of four continuous survey-cycles as the biggest 45 RPM in the land on the Hot 100 Singles chart this week in ’82. Cougar’s album, American Fool, was also in the prime position on the Top LPs & Tape chart this week. (**See below) To date, this has been his biggest hit single. The song reportedly is loosely-based on the motion picture from 1962, Sweet Bird Of Youth, starring Paul Newman, Geraldine Page and Ed Begley; which was based on the 1959 play by Tennessee Williams, with Newman and Page reprising their Broadway roles. Hold on to 16 as long as you can kids, and clap along while ya watch and listen to “Jack & Diane” right now.

Speaking about the clapping on “Jack & Diane”—it wasn’t supposed to remain on the finished track as John Cougar Mellencamp couldn’t get his band to follow the odd tempo changes in the song. He claimed without the clapping, it sounded even more like crap. So they stayed. Mellencamp’s—oops—Cougar’s LP was No. 1 this week as well. (**See below.)

 

TOP 50

ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES

 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

 

No.1

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“HEARLIGHT”

 

(Neil Diamond / Burt Bacharach / Carole Bayer Sager)

 

Flip-Side:

“YOU DON’T KNOW ME”

 

NEIL DIAMOND

 

COLUMBIA Records  03219

 

Produced by:

 

 

BURT BACHARACH, CAROLE BAYER SAGER & NEIL DIAMOND

 

 

Arranged & Conducted by:

 

BURT BACHARACH

 

 

Mixed by: BILL SCHNEE & JEREMY SMITH

 

Given this song’s pedigree, it was almost a certain hit. Songwriters Neil Diamond, Burt Bacharach and his then wife Carole Bayer Sager put their noggin’s together for the song inspired by the film E.T. All three got producer’s credit as well. The track was arranged and conducted by Bacharach. A little known fact was that in order to even use any ideas from the film for a song, the songwriters had to collectively kick-in $25 grand to Universal Studios. How’s that for a licensing fee? That’s enough to phone home every minute of every day for a century if you own a smartphone; or whatever we’ll be communicating with a hundred years from now!

The title track from the Columbia album also called Heartlight was enjoying its initial week, of an ultimate four survey-cycles as the standard-barer on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart; while reaching a respectable peak slot of No. 5 on the Hot 100 Singles listing. The 45 RPM was at No. 16 this week on that chart. This would be the last Top 5 hit for Diamond, as his recorded music wasn’t embraced the way his music had been for nearly two decades. The idea for the song happened directly after Neil, Burt and Carole saw the film and went back to the couple’s apartment to come up with the simple musical statement. They must have clicked, as the three songwriting superstars wrote five more songs integrated into the LP Heartlight, including “Front Page Story” a minor hit in ’83 for Diamond. Brooklyn boy Diamond continues to pack ‘em in at live shows and still records. He was finally inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame for the class of 2011.

 

BLACK

SINGLES

 

 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82

 

No.1

 

R&B (Black)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“LOVE COME DOWN”

 

 

(Kashif Saleem)

 

Flip-Side:

“LOVE COME DOWN -- INSTRUMENTAL”

 

 

EVELYN KING

 

RCA VICTOR Records  13273

 

 

 

Produced by:

 

MORRIE BROWN for MIGHTY M Productions

 

Assistant Producers: KASHIF and PAUL LAWRENCE JONES, Jr.

 

Bronx born, but Philly-raised Evelyn “Bubbles” King had already had two million-selling singles. “Bubbles” had altered her name to the more mature “Champagne” when she began having hits on RCA Records at the age of 17—still a bit young to be imbibing. Flash-forward to 1982; and Evelyn was still at it with a new producer and a new sound with “Love Come Down” although she dropped all of the gimmicky nicknames and was just plain Evelyn King by then.


“Love Come Down,” in its fourth of five eventual back-to-back weeks as the No. 1 song on the Black Singles chart during this survey-period in ’82, sprang from the LP Get Loose, (**See The Big Albums listing below) headed by a producer and songwriter for Evelyn King, Kashif—a/k/a Kashif Saleem, born Michael Jones. The former member of the Columbia Records-era B. T. Express co-produced that LP. (**See the B.T. Express story above in the ‘70s section.) Kashif was also the writer of “Love Come Down.” He also wrote the follow-up single called “Betcha She Don’t Love You” which reached No. 49 on the Hot 100, but attained the strong position of No. 2 on the Black Singles chart. Kashif went on to produce and write many hit songs including “You Give Good Love” by then newcomer Whitney Houston.

 

THE

BIG 

ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 23, 1982

 

TOP

LPs & TAPES 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

 

No.1

 

Pop

LP

AMERICAN FOOL

 

 

JOHN COUGAR

 

RIVA Records 7501 

 

Produced by:


JOHN COUGAR MELLENCAMP & DON GEHMAN

 

This was the last album for the artist known as John Cougar. He’d be called John Cougar Mellencamp beginning in 1983, keeping the “Cougar” nickname (which he hated) until 1991, when he simply used his real name; John Mellencamp. American Fool was no stooge, nyuk, nyuk, nyuk. The LP contained both of his biggest hits, “Hurt So Good” (No. 2 Pop for four weeks) and “Jack & Diane (No. 1 Pop) his biggest hit single ever. (**See above.) Those two tracks had been hits earlier in ’82, so it was kind of a surprise that American Fool was still strong nearing the end of the year. There was still another single lurking from the album called “Hand To Hold On To.”

“Hand To Hold On To” had just been released, and was about to reach the Hot 100 Singles chart in two survey-phases, for the week ending on November 6, 1982; yet this 45 RPM was a disappointment when it only reached No. 19 on that survey. This was the seventh of nine adjoining weeks at the pinnacle of the Top LPs & Tape chart for American Fool. The album almost didn’t get completed, as Riva Records’s execs thought they were getting a sterile Pop album to promote. Instead, what they heard was something they didn’t know what to do with. The co-producer with Mellencamp was Don Gehman, who says he and John had put together over 20 songs, but the A&R (Artists & Repertoire) guy just didn’t like what he heard; almost dumping Gehman. Mellencamp somehow got them to let them finish the tracks with his co-producer and he was on his way to having an album that would go on to sell over five million copies. I wonder if that A&R guy still had a job after he was proven wrong. Or maybe he was promoted after his final decision to release it after all was correct?

BLACK

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

 

No. 1

 

 

R&B

(Black)

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

GET LOOSE

 

 

EVELYN KING

 

RCA VICTOR Records  4337

 

Produced by:


THE GLIMMER TWINS

 

 

Associate Producer:

 

 

 

Chris Kimsey

 

 

Get Loose was set free on the Black LPs chart, as it sat at the peak of that list for the second and final week at No. 1 for Evelyn King on RCA Victor Records. King was discovered at the now being demolished home of Sigma Sound Studios (Philadelphia International Records) on South Broad Street in Philadelphia, where she was cleaning the facilities part-time with her mother. A producer there named Theodore Life overheard her singing in the ladies room, and when she came out (thankfully) he offered to get her a production deal plus a contract with the competing RCA Victor Records. That first hit was “Shame” (No. 9 Pop and No. 7 on the then called Hot Soul Singles chart) released in ’78 and one of the first four records inducted into the short-lived Dance Music Hall of Fame. Move ahead to 1982, and the hit that was still No. 1 on the Black Singles chart for its four of five weeks called “Love Come Down.” (**See above in the Big Singles list.) But lurking in the wings was another R&B monster hit from Evelyn King called “Betcha She Don’t Love you.”

Except for drums and percussion, all of the other instrumental sounds on “Betcha She Don’t Love You” were expertly crafted by the song’s writer/arranger Kashif. He performed all synthesizers on the track, made to sound like real instruments with another-worldly dimension, much like Stevie Wonder did on his albums. King only had two more low-charting entries on the Hot 100 that didn’t make much noise.

 

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert. 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

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