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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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October 9th, 2015
 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 15, 1966



HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

 

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

**********************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 8)

“YOU CAN’T HURRY LOVE”

(Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier / Eddie Holland)

Produced by: BRIAN HOLLAND & LAMONT DOZIER

THE SUPREMES

MOTOWN Records  1097

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 10)

“I’VE GOT YOU UNDER MY SKIN”

(Cole Porter)

Produced by: BOB CREWE

Arranged & Conducted by: ARTIE SCHROECK

THE FOUR SEASONS Featuring the ‘sound’ of Frankie Valli

PHILIPS Records  40393

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 11)

“WHAT BECOMES OF THE BROKEN HEARTED”

(Paul Riser / James Dean / William Weatherspoon)

Produced by: WILLIAM STEVENSON & WILLIAM WEATHERSPOON

JIMMY RUFFIN

SOUL Records  35022

******************************

No. 7  (LW 14)

“WALK AWAY RENEE”

(Mike Brown / Bob Calilli / Tony Sansone)

Produced by: HARRY LOOKOFSKY for WORLD UNITED Productions

Arranged by: JOHN ABBOTT

THE LEFT BANKE

SMASH Records  2041

******************************

No. 6  (LW 7)

“CHERRY, CHERRY”

(Neil Diamond)

Produced by: JEFF BARRY & ELLIE GREENWICH

Arranged by: ARTIE BUTLER

NEIL DIAMOND

BANG Records  528

******************************

No. 5  (LW 9)

“PSYCHOTIC REACTION”

(Ken Ellner / Roy Chaney / Craig Atkinson / Sean Byrne / John Michalski)

Produced by: JOSEPH HOOVEN—HAL WINN

COUNT FIVE

DOUBLE SHOT Records  104

******************************

No. 4  (LW 6)

“LAST TRAIN TO CLARKSVILLE”

(Tommy Boyce / Bobby Hart)

Produced by: TOMMY BOYCE & BOBBY HART

Music Supervision: DON KIRSHNER

THE MONKEES

COLGEMS Records  1001

******************************

No. 3  (LW 3)

“96 TEARS”

(Rudy Martinez)

***On the 96 TEARS LP it is listed as written by (The Mysterians)    

Recording Director: NEIL BOGART

? & THE MYSTERIANS

CAMEO Records  428

******************************

No. 2  (LW 1)

“CHERISH”

(Terry Kirkman)

Produced by: CURT BOETTCHER

THE ASSOCIATION

VALIANT Records 747

******************************

 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“REACH OUT I’LL BE THERE”



(Brian Holland / Lamont Dozier / Eddie Holland)

 

Flip-Side:

“UNTIL YOU LOVE SOMEONE”

 

 

FOUR TOPS

MOTOWN Records1098

 

Produced by: BRIAN HOLLAND & LAMONT DOZIER

 

 

Yet another Holland-Dozier-Holland masterwork for Motown Records and Four Tops with “Reach Out I’ll Be There” sitting at the helm of the Hot 100 Singles chronicle this week in ’66. The melody was what first clutched us with the flute and Middle-Eastern-type opening, complete with the sound of whacks on two-by-fours surrounded by an echo chamber (actually in the attic) at the Hitsville, U.S.A. studios in Detroit. Then, the Funk Brothers (the studio cats) and Levi Stubbs, Renaldo “Obie” Benson, Lawrence Payton and Abdul “Duke” Fakir whacked us over the head with one of their most stellar vocal tracks ever; enlarged by the female vocal group, the Andantes on the soaring high notes harmonies.

This was the earliest record by Four Tops to be certified as a million-selling 45 RPM; as Motown’s founder Berry Gordy, Jr. usually didn’t release sales figures. It’s likely that “I Can’t Help Myself” from 1965 was truly the first; but it wasn’t reported. The sound on “Reach Out I’ll Be There” was a different approach from previous hits by Four Tops with its major/minor key changes, along with the mystifying sounds coming out of the “snake-pit” studio (about the size of a garage) in the Motor City. What stayed the same was the singing/shouting that became Levi Stubb’s signature sound. Oddly, the song was the key tune on the Hot 100 before becoming the chart-topper on the R&B side two survey-cycles later. The song that kept it out of the top spot on the R&B list during those weeks was “Beauty Is Only Skin Deep” by the Temptations. (**See below.) The current LP by Four Tops was called On Top, containing the great songs: “Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever” (a Stevie Wonder / Ivy Joe Hunter tune—No. 45 Pop) “Shake Me, Wake Me (When It’s Over)” (No. 18 Pop) and a later (1967) phenomenal B-side to the single “Bernadette,” called “I Got A Feeling.” But this week’s No. 1 song (currently No. 3 R&B) was not contained on this Long-Player. “Reach Out I’ll Be There” was given a Lifetime Achievement Award Grammy® in 2009. This was the first of two weeks in ’66 as the standard-barer on the Pop Hot 100 for the former Jazz group, originally known as The Four Aims. The first member of Four Tops to pass away was Lawrence Albert Payton, who died in 1997 of liver cancer. Next to leave us was Renaldo “Obie” Benson of lung cancer and other ailments in 2005. Lead singer Levi Stubbs died of a stroke at his home in 2008. Abdul “Duke” Fakir is the only original member of the Four Tops still with us. Four Tops got to join the class of 1990 in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, A Pioneer Award by the Rhythm & Blues Foundation in ’97, induction into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1999 and voted into the fairly new (started in 2013) R&B Music Hall of Fame in its inaugural year—in addition to many other awards and honors.

 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

 

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 4)

 

“SUMMER WIND”



(Henry (Heinz) Mayer / Johnny Mercer)

 

Flip-Side:

“YOU MAKE ME FEEL SO YOUNG”

Frank Sinatra with Count Basie

 

 

FRANK SINATRA

 

 

REPRISE Records0509

 

Produced by:

 

SONNY BURKE

 

Arranged & Conducted by:

 

NELSON RIDDLE

 

The Chairman of the Board was on a roll. “Strangers In The Night” had just recently been Old Blue Eyes’ first No. 1 record since 1955’s “Learnin’ The Blues.” Sinatra’s current LP, Strangers In The Night, contained (as track two) the song “Summer Wind.” That song was the follow-up to “Strangers In The Night,” yet it just reached No. 25 as a peak slot on the Pop Hot 100; a far cry from its predecessor. But “Summer Wind” was a scorcher on the Top 40 Easy Listening singles register; but for just this sole survey-period. “You can argue that the song “Summer Wind” had longer legs in popularity over the years than Frank’s previous single. No one can deny that “Strangers In The Night” was the song that brought him back from the brink of Pop music success, yet again; but “Summer Wind” has become one of the evergreens in the musical vault of Sinatra. Here’s a re-mastered and elegant track, “Summer Wind.”

Did you know that Sinatra was NOT the first to record “Summer Wind?” The song had been recorded first (in ’65) by a 23 year-old Wayne Newton at Sinatra’s old record label Capitol Records, and had first charted 13 months prior to Sinatra’s version hit the Hot 100. Newton’s performance only reached No. 68 on that list in ’65. The hit streak that Sinatra was currently riding was started in late 1965 (just before “Strangers In The Night”) with the release of the song “It Was A Very Good Year” reaching No. 28—the highest charting song on the Hot 100 for Frank since 1964’s “Softly As I Leave You.” “Summer Wind” was followed-up by “That’s Life” (No. 4 Pop & No. 1 Easy Listening) and then the last No. 1 on the Hot 100 for Frank; “Somethin’ Stupid” in a duet, where his daughter Nancy got top-billing.

 

TOP SELLING R&B

 SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

 

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

“BEAUTY IS ONLY SKIN DEEP”

 

THE TEMPTATIONS

 

(Norman Whitfield / Eddie Holland)

 

Flip-Side:

“YOU’RE NOT AN ORDINARY GIRL”

 

Produced by:

 

NORMAN WHITFIELD

 

GORDY RECORDS – 7055

 

While the current Temptations album was called Gettin’ Ready—featuring the songs “Get Ready” and “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg”—their current 45 RPM release (that was NOT on that LP) was sitting at the apex of the Top Selling R&B Singles special survey, this week in ’66. “Beauty Is Only Skin Deep” did show finally up on a later album called The Temptations Greatest Hits released on November 16, 1966 as its opening track. “Beauty Is Only Skin Deep” was co-written by up-and-coming producer/songwriter Norman Whitfield (who had begun taking over the Temptations’ production reigns from Smokey Robinson) with words by Eddie Holland.

David Ruffin got the lead on this song; produced with a bit of grit by Whitfield. “Beauty Is Only Skin Deep” was currently seated in the No. 12 after reaching a peak spot of No. 3 several weeks back. So this was another case where the Pop Hot 100 was a bit ahead of the R&B Singles chart regarding certain records. This was the third song to be listed by Berry Gordy, Jr.’s Temptations as a certified million-seller. “Beauty Is Only Skin Deep” was the first in a new streak of what would become four-straight Pop Top 10 hits; and the third of four consecutive No. 1 songs on the R&B singles list. 

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 15, 1966

 

TOP

LPs

 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

 

No. 1

 

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

REVOLVER

 

 

 

THE BEATLES

 

 

CAPITOL RECORDS – 2576

 

 

Produced by:

 

George Martin

 

Revolver is thought by many Beatles specialists and musicologists as being their finest LP. Of course, that’s debatable; but this collection of songs (even the American release) was a high watermark with the group at its peak of collective excellence. At the request of John Lennon, the cover design for Revolver came from one of the groups’ earliest friends Klaus Voorman, who met them when they performed in the Reeperbahn section of Hamburg, West Germany in the early ‘60s. Voorman’s penciled doodling was an innovative way of showing the “new” Beatles, developing beyond their reputation as ‘Mop-Tops.” The only U.S. single from Revolver was “Yellow Submarine” backed with “Eleanor Rigby.” 10 years later, in 1976, Capitol released another single from Revolver; “Got To Get You Into My Life” oddly backed with “Helter Skelter” from the ‘White Album’ a/k/a The Beatles. Once again, production on Revolver was headed by George Martin with engineering and mixing help from Geoff Emerick recorded at the EMI Studio at Abbey Road, in London. The U.S. Revolver included this track listing: Side One—“Taxman,” “Eleanor Rigby,” “Love To You,” “Here, There And Everywhere,” “Yellow Submarine” and “She Said She Said.” Side Two—“Good Day Sunshine,” “For No One,” “I Want To Tell You,”

 “Got To Get You Into My Life” and “Tomorrow Never Knows.” My fave track from the American Revolver is “She Said She Said,” featured here.

The Beatles didn’t care for the machinations of Capitol Records, (EMI’s American subsidiary) and would only be resolute enough by 1967 to stop the practice of changing the amount of songs or adding or subtracting cuts from an LP. Revolver from the Beatles was the Fabs’ third number one LP released in the U.S. during 1966; sitting in the top slot for the last of six weeks on Capitol Records. This album’s release in North America was altered from the original version put out in the U.K. In fact, there were three less tracks on the album in the states. But interestingly, we had already heard them! In the U.S., Capitol Records (a subsidiary of EMI Records/Parlophone) had released a hodgepodge album we knew as Yesterday And Today that reached number one just weeks earlier in ’66. Those three tunes “Doctor Robert,” “And Your Bird Can Sing” and “I’m Only Sleeping” would be released weeks later on the international version of Revolver. When Beatles CDs were released; original British versions became the norm. The name of the album came about after many suggestions; with the boys deciding upon Revolver to depict a record spinning on a turntable, and for a pun about a handgun. The irony is not lost on John Lennon devotees.

 

TOP SELLING R&B

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

 

No. 1

 

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

SOULIN’

 

 

LOU RAWLS

 

 

CAPITOL RECORDS2566

 

Produced by:

 

DAVID AXELROD

Arranged and Conducted by:

 

HIDLE BROWN “H.B.” BARNUM



 

Ex-Gospel singer Lou Allen Rawls had his second No. 1 album this week on the Top Selling R&B LPs chart with his long-player Soulin’ on Capitol Records. His first No. 1 was Lou Rawls Live which had been on top of that chart for a total of 12 survey-periods earlier in ’66. Rawls’ album called Soulin’ ended up with a total of nine weeks at the pinnacle position on this chart, and was currently in the third of an ultimate eight survey-cycles of its run there. The initial single to burst through the noise for Rawls came from this LP Soulin’ called “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing.” This occurred after a dismal chart position for his debut charting 45 RPM called “Three O’Clock In The Morning” in ’65, reaching only No. 83 Pop. “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing” reached No. 13 on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart, but saw its strength on the Top Selling R&B Singles listing; eventually reaching No. 1 for the week ending on November 12, 1966. Rawls sings the story of a man who’s lived too long with anguish quite persuasively. Here’s a TV appearance by Lou Rawls singing his first big hit, “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing.”



It should be pointed out that Lou Rawls was one of the opening acts for the Beatles during their last concert go round in Cincinnati at Crosley Field on August 21, 1966 just before “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing” took off. There were both on Capitol Records, so draw your own conclusions about him being on the bill. Rawls had been linked with Sam Cooke; even replacing him in the Gospel group the Highway QC’s when Cooke left to join the Soul Stirrers in 1950. Rawls was in the U.S. Army for three years. After service, Rawls was in a car wreck in 1958; in a coma for about a week, recovering after extensive rehabilitation. After Sam Cooke switched to secular music, Rawls did the same and signed with Capitol in ‘62. The same year, Lou sang with Cooke on hit songs like “Bring It On Home To Me,” “That’s Where It’s At” and “Having A Party.” Lou Rawls went on to win three Grammy® Awards for Best R&B Male Performance during his career, and had quite a run later in his career with Philadelphia International Records, where he had his biggest hit single; “You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine” (No. 2 Pop, No. 1 R&B & No. 1 Adult Contemporary) written by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. Other notable 45 RPM hits from Rawls included: “Dead End Street” (No. 29 Pop in ‘67) a song about living in a Chicago ghetto, and his first Grammy® winner for Best R&B Vocal Performance, “You’re Good Thing Is About To End” (No. 18 Pop) in ’69, “A Natural Man” (No. 17 Pop) in 1971 his first release on MGM Records, written by comedian Sandy Baron and Bobby Hebb of “Sunny”-fame. His last hit of any notoriety was with the luscious “Lady Love” (No. 24 Pop) in ’78. Lou had an exquisite version of “Wind Beneath My Wings” in ’83 as his last Hot 100 chart entry; six years before Bette Midler made it a Grammy® Song and Record of the Year in ’89. Lou Rawls died of lung and brain cancer at age 72 on January 6, 2006 in Los Angeles.


 

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 13, 1973

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 4)

“WE’RE AN AMERICAN BAND

(Don Brewer)

Produced by: TODD RUNDGREN

GRAND FUNK

CAPITOL Records  3660

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 10)

“KEEP ON TRUCKIN’

(Part 1”

(Frank Wilson / Anita Poree / Leonard Caston)

Produced by: FRANK WILSON & LEONARD CASTON

Arranged by: JAMES CARMICHAEL & JERRY LONG

EDDIE KENDRICKS

TAMLA Records  54238F

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 11)

“MIDNIGHT TRAIN TO GEORGIA)”

(Jim Weatherly)

Produced, Arranged & Conducted by: TONY CAMILLO

GLADYS KNIGHT & THE PIPS

BUDDAH Records  383

******************************

No. 7  (LW 2)

“LOVES ME LIKE A ROCK”

(Paul Simon)

Produced by: PAUL SIMON, THE MUSCLE SHOALS RHYTHM SECTION & PHIL RAMONE

PAUL SIMON

with the DIXIE HUMMINGBIRDS

COLUMBIA Records  45907

******************************

No. 6  (LW 6)

“THAT LADY (Part 1)”

(-The Isleys- Ronald, O’Kelly & Rudolph Isley)

Produced, Arranged & Conducted by: RONALD, O’KELLY & RUDOLPH ISLEY

THE ISLEY BROTHERS

T-NECK Records  2251

******************************

No. 5  (LW 8)

“ANGIE”

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richard)

Produced by: JIMMY MILLER

Strings Arranged by: NICKY HARRISON

THE ROLLING STONES

ROLLING STONES Records – 19105

******************************

No. 4  (LW 5)

“HIGHER GROUND”

(Stevie Wonder)

Produced & Arranged by: STEVIE WONDER

STEVIE WONDER

TAMLA Records  54235F

******************************

 

No. 3  (LW 3)

“LET’S GET IT ON”

(Ed Townsend)

Produced by: MARVIN GAYE & ED TOWNSEND

Arranged by: RENE HALL

MARVIN GAYE

TAMLA Records  54234F

******************************

No. 2  (LW 7)

“RAMBLIN’ MAN”

(Richard Betts)

Produced by: JOHNNY SANDLIN & THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND for CAPRICORN RECORDS with special arrangement by PHIL WALDEN & ASSOC, Inc.

THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND

CAPRICORN Records  0027

******************************



 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 
“HALF- BREED”



(Mary Dean / Al Capps)

 

 

CHER

 

MCA Records41012

 

Produced by:

 

SNUFF GARRETT

for GARRETT MUSIC ENTERPRISES

 

Arranged by:

 

AL CAPPS

 

 

Cherilyn Sarkasian a/k/a Cher had her second No. 1 solo single to date on the Hot 100 Singles chart with “Half-Breed” on MCA Records. It was her second million-selling single. This 45 RPM was at the chart’s summit for two seven-day survey-phases. I find it quite interesting that Cher’s biggest hits during the early to mid-‘70s were all quite quirky lyrically, including: “Gypsy, Tramps & Thieves” (No. 1 Pop) in ‘71 “Half- Breed” (this week’s No. 1 45 RPM) and “Dark Lady” (No. 1 Pop) in ’74. “Half-Breed” almost didn’t get recorded, as Cher’s producer Snuff Garrett had a falling out with Sonny Bono over the material she should sing as a solo act. Reportedly, the song’s lyric writer, Mary Dean, didn’t realize Cher was not under the tutelage of Garrett when she gave him the song “Half Breed.” Garrett instinctively knew that only Cher could pull off recording this song. Somehow, negotiations brought Cher back into the good graces of Garrett. After the song languished for several months, she recorded her second million-seller.

By the time “Half Breed” was No. 1, Sonny & Cher’s time as a hit-making recording act was over after the low-charting duet on MCA Records, “Mama Was A Rock And Roll Singer, Papa Used To Write All Her Songs (Part 1)” reached the paltry position of No. 77 Pop on the Hot 100. With a title like that, you can see why is bombed. Cher clearly wanted a totally solo recording career by this point; and this week’s No. 1 record solidified that decision.


TOP 50

EASY LISTENING

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

 

No.1

 

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“ALL I KNOW”

 

(Jimmy Webb)

 

Flip-Side:

“MARY WAS AN ONLY CHILD”

 

ART GARFUNKEL

 

COLUMBIA Records  45926

 

Produced by:

 

 

ART GARFUNKEL & ROY HALEE

 

 

Strings Arranged & Conducted by:

 

ERNIE FREEMAN

 

 

For my money, there is no sweeter tenor voice in all of Pop music better than that of Art Garfunkel’s. If there was a “Bridge Over Troubled Water – Part 2)”—this song would be it. Most people have forgotten about this week’s chart-topping tune on the Top 50 Easy Listening Chart; “All I Know” from Art Garfunkel. This Jimmy Webb song was included on the very pleasant Garfunkel solo LP called Angel Clare on Columbia Records. Larry Knechtel, who played the memorable piano track on “Bridge Over Troubled Water” also performed the same duty on “All I Know,” along with many other members of the L.A. “Wrecking Crew” studio musicians—many who also played on Simon & Garfunkel’s magnum-opus. So the similarities were bound to be heard with “All I Know.” But add the pedigree of songwriter Jimmy Webb, and you have what I consider another masterpiece.

Another song from the Angel Clare LP was the follow-up single to “All I Know” called “I Shall Sing,” written by the one and only Van Morrison. By far, “All I Know” was Art Garfunkel’s biggest Hot 100 hit song (No. 9 Pop) and it was first of four No. 1 songs on the Easy Listening Singles special surveys, including: “I Only Have Eyes For You” in ’75 (No. 18 Pop) “Break Away (No. 39 Pop) and “(What A) Wonderful World” listed as by Art Garfunkel with James Taylor & Paul Simon—the longest lasting Easy Listening No. 1 song for Garfunkel at five weeks. Art along with his sometimes partner Paul Simon were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. In 2010, Garfunkel suffered from what’s called “vocal cord paresis,” after he stopped smoking just weeks before. His ailment was a weakness in one or more of the vocal folds; causing hoarseness—a singer’s worst nightmare. It took Garfunkel nearly four years of on-again-off-again cancelled tour dates to get back up to speed. He presumably liked to smoke weed, as Art was arrested twice for possession in ’04 and again in ’05. 

 

HOT

SOUL

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73

 

No.1

 

R&B (SOUL)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“KEEP ON TRUCKIN’ (Part 1)”

 

 

(Frank Wilson / Anita Poree /

Leonard Caston)

 

Flip-Side:

“KEEP ON TRUCKIN’ (Part 2)”

 

 

EDDIE KENDRICKS

 

TAMLA Records  54238

 

 

 

Produced and Arranged by:

 

FRANK WILSON & LEONARD CASTON

 

Arranged by:

 

 

 

JAMES CARMICHAEL & JERRY LONG

His final single singing lead on a Temptations recording was back in ’71 with “Just My Imagination (Running Away With Me)” (No. 1 Pop & No. 1 R&B) after Eddie Kendricks reluctantly left the vocal group just when it started its climb up the charts. Kendricks always maintained that it wasn’t his intention to leave the Temptations, but was forced to go into a fully solo career after he was not allowed to record by himself, in addition to his group duties. His first few forays into solo-land didn’t fare too well on the Hot 100; although here in NYC, followers of early Disco music will perhaps recall a song called “Girl, You Need A Change Of Mind (Part 1)” being played in the new dance clubs. While that 45 RPM only charted at No. 87 on the Hot 100, it was well received in the early genesis of the Disco movement. But after a follow-up single flopped after just five weeks on the Pop list called “Darling Come Back Home,” Tamla (Motown) realized it had a hit and quickly replaced that song with “Keep On Truckin’ (Part 1).” This 45 RPM was the prime record on the Hot 100 for this, the second and final survey-cycle at the helm. But you know your Big Jay. I’m gonna feature the over eight minute LP version. “Keep On Truckin’ Parts 1 & 2” in all of its glory.

The follow-up to Eddie Kendricks’ only No. 1 song on the Hot 100 was “Boogie Down,” a slightly faster song with a similar feel as “Keep On Truckin’.” “Boogie Down” was followed by a minor hit, “Son Of Sagittarius” (No. 28 Pop) in ’74. Minor hits came next; then a decent showing with “Shoeshine Boy” (No. 18 Pop & No. 1 R&B single) in 75. He got one more shot at a Top 40 solo hit in ’76 with the Disco-influenced “He’s A Friend.” It would take another nine years; but Kendricks teamed up with former group-mate David Ruffin for some touring. One of those dates was saved for posterity, when Daryl Hall & John Oates released a single featuring the two Motown legendary voices for a one-off record called, “A Nite At The Apollo Live! The Way You Do The Things You Do / My Girl” giving both Kendricks and Ruffin one more glorious moment in the spotlight. David Ruffin passed away in Philadelphia from a drug overdose in 1991 age 50 (drugs was just one of the reasons he was booted from the Temptations in 1968) and Kendricks died the year after Ruffin from lung cancer at the age of 52.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 13, 1973

 

TOP

LPs & TAPE 

 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73:

 

No. 1

 

Pop

LP

 

(Last Week No. 9)

 

**WARNING: Graphic word included in this segment. NSFW**

 

GOATS HEAD SOUP

 

 

 

 

THE ROLLING STONES

 

ROLLING STONES Records  59101

 

Produced by:

 

 

JIMMY MILLER

 

It was the first of four back-to-back survey-   stages in the peak spot for the Rolling Stones’ 13th U.S. album, Goats Head Soup. This release, on Rolling Stones Records (a subsidiary of Atlantic Records) didn’t like the first choice of “Angie” as the first single from the LP. Atlantic wanted a signature rocker as the first track to be on a 45 RPM A side. But the Stones prevailed. Now let’s put this myth to rest. The song “Angie” (which was the band’s choice as the first single) was NOT about David Bowie’s wife from 1970 to 1980, Angela (Angie) Barnett. Nor was it about Keith Richards’ daughter named Dandelion Angela. She hadn’t been born at the time the song was written by Keith Richards. His then girlfriend, Anita Pallenberg, was pregnant with Dandelion Angela when Keef wrote the song, and at that time, people didn’t even know the sex of the unborn child until they took their first breath. Today, the now 43 year-old goes by Angela, dropping the Dandelion moniker, also the name of the 1967 Rolling Stones hit song; and one of Big Jay’s personal fave Stones records. But here’s “Angie,” currently No. 5 (after just six weeks on the chart) heading for No. 1 for a sole week during the very next seven-day survey-period on the Hot 100.



The Rolling Stones were not allowed to be in many countries when they needed to join forces to record what would become the LP Goats Head Soup. To put it nicely, the “Bad Boys of Rock & Roll” had lived up to the reputation at the time, with some members not allowed into certain jurisdictions due to drug issues. So, the Stones ended up in Jamaica to record the album, which (legend has it) was named after just what you might think; road-killed goat—with the head of the animal made into soup—a Jamaican dish. The follow-up single to “Angie” was “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)” reaching No. 15 in February of ’74, followed by “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)” (No. 16 Pop) in September of ’74 and finally, a remake of the Temptations hit “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” peaking at No. 17 at the end of ’74. The release of Goats Head Soup was delayed by a couple of months by Atlantic Records, after the Glimmer Twins (Jagger & Richard) had written and recorded (with the group) a song originally called “Starfucker.” The record company insisted that the name of the labels be changed to “Star Star.” There were a couple of “lasts” for Goats Head Soup. It was the last Stones LP to utilize Jimmy Miller as their producer (drug dependency was the official reason given) and it was the last of their albums to feature guitarist Mick Taylor, who had replaced Brian Jones in the band in 1969; with Taylor citing musical disparity as the reason for his exit. Ron Wood would eventually take his place in the Rolling Stones. A future Rolling Stones hit single, “Waiting On A Friend” (No. 13 Pop) also released in 1981 on the album Tattoo You came from the sessions for Goats Head Soup, recorded in 1973! Wow, the Stones were pulling an Elvis—taking old recordings a releasing them years later.

 

SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘73:

 

No. 1

 

 

R&B

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

LET’S GET IT ON

 

 

 

MARVIN GAYE

 

TAMLA Records  329

 

 

Produced by:

 

MARVIN GAYE & ED TOWNSEND

(Side One)

 

MARVIN GAYE

(Side Two)

 

(Side One) Arranged by:

 

RENE HALL

 

(Side Two) Arranged by:

 

DAVID BLUMBERG, DAVID Van DE PITTE & GENE PAGE

 

Engineered and Mixed by:

 

ART STEWART & CAL HARRIS

 

Marvin Gaye’s first full-force foray in his sexual nature appeared on the LP Let’s Get It On released on Tamla Records; No. 1 this week on the Soul LPs special survey. On this chart, it was the third of an uninterrupted 11 weeks for the album Let’s Get It On during this survey-cycle in ’73. The song “Let’s Get It On” originally had totally different lyrics, supplied by Ed Townsend, who had his own recording career, with the self-penned R&B song “For Your Love” (No. 13 Pop) in 1958. Townsend had originally given a religious spin to the song when he wrote it, after he had spent time in an alcohol rehab. One of Marvin Gaye’s pals changed the lyrics to reflect more of a political slant and was recorded. However; Townsend vehemently protested, and insisted that song be changed to reflect a religious fervor about sex and love. So, with the lyrics changed yet again, Gaye and Townsend re-recorded the lyrics (and kept the music track) and this is the version we all know and love.

** Note: the video has been removed from Vimeo and YouTube by Marvin Gaye's Estate. **

That’s the album-length version of “Let’s Get It On.” The single was No. 1 on the Hot 100 for two survey-phases, and sat in the pinnacle position on the Soul Singles listing for six back-to-back weeks during August and September of ‘73. Other 45 RPM single releases from the LP included: “Come Get To This” (a HUGE Big Jay fave (No. 21 Pop & No. 3 Soul) and the sexually-charged “You Sure Love To Ball” (No. 50 Pop & No. 13 Soul) which was certainly kept from a lot of Top 40 radio-play simply due to the title. Another LP track “Distant Lover” (the B side of “Come Get To This) was later released as a live version single (No. 28 Pop & No. 12 Soul) from Gaye’s concert LP called Marvin Gaye Live! in ’74, recorded at the Oakland Coliseum on January 4, 1974. During the run of Let’s Get It On (the LP) Motown diluted the sales of the two other singles from that album, by releasing two duets listed as by Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye: “You’re A Special Part Of Me” (No. 12 Pop & No. 4 Soul) and “My Mistake (Was To Love You)” (No. 19 Pop & No. 15 Soul) on Diana’s Motown label. Ross was said to be pregnant at the time of the recording of the album called Diana & Marvin. Reportedly, when Ross first walked into the studio, Gaye was smoking weed. Ross is said to have walked out of the session. Motown’s owner/founder Berry Gordy, Jr., asked Gaye to get rid of the reefer. Gaye supposedly said, “If I can’t smoke, I can’t sing.” But Gordy talked Marvin into dumping the joint, and Ross reentered the vocal booth.

 


THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

 

For the   Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 17, 1981

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘81:

 

 


THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 11)

“THE NIGHT OWLS”

(Graham Goble)

Produced by: GEORGE MARTIN for AIR STUDIOS

LITTLE RIVER BAND

CAPITOL Records  5033

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 13)

“HARD TO SAY”

(Dan Fogelberg)

Produced by: DAN FOGELBERG with MARTY LEWIS

DAN FOGELBERG

(with Glen Frey on harmony vocals)

FULL MOON / EPIC Records  02488

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 4)

“WHO’S CRYING NOW”

(Steve Perry / Jonathan Cain)

Produced by: MIKE STONE for Mike Stone Enterprises, Ltd.

& KEVEN ELSON for Elson Music Vision

 

JOURNEY

COLUMBIA Records  18-02241

******************************

No. 7  (LW 3)

“STOP DRAGGIN’ MY HEART AROUND”

(Tom Petty / Michael Campbell)

Produced by: JIMMY IOVINE and TOM PETTY

Engineered by: SHELLY YAKUS

STEVIE NICKS

(with Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers)

MODERN Records  7336

******************************

No. 6  (LW 8)

“PRIVATE EYES”

(Daryl Hall / Warren Pash / Sara Allen / Janna Allen)

Produced by: DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES Co/Producer: NEIL KERNON

DARYL HALL &

JOHN OATES

RCA Records  12296

******************************

No. 5  (LW 6)

“STEP BY STEP”

(Eddie Rabbitt / Even Stevens / David Malloy)

Produced by: DAVID MALLOY

EDDIE RABBITT

ELEKTRA Records - 47174

******************************

No. 4  (LW 5)

“FOR YOUR EYES ONLY”

Vocal by: SHEENA EASTON

(Bill Conti / Mike Leeson)

Produced by: CHRISTOPHER NEIL

ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK

LIBERTY Records  1418

******************************

No. 3  (LW 7)

“START ME UP”

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richards)

Produced by: The GLIMMER TWINS

Associate Producer and Engineer: CHRIS KIMSEY for Wonder Knob, Ltd.

Remix by: Bob Clearmountain

THE ROLLING STONES

ROLLING STONES Records  21003

******************************

No. 2  (LW 1)

“ENDLESS LOVE”

(Lionel Richie)

Produced by: LIONEL RICHIE
Arranged by: GENE PAGE

DIANA ROSS & LIONEL RICHIE

MOTOWN Records 1519F

******************************

 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“ARTHUR’S THEME

(Best That You Can Do)”



(Peter Allen / Burt Bacharach / Christopher Cross / Carole Bayer Sager)

 

Flip-Side:

“MINSTREL GIGOLO”

 

 

CHRISTOPHER CROSS

 

WARNER BROS. Records49787

 

Produced by:

 

MICHAEL OMARTIAN

 

Executive Producer:

 

STEPHEN PALEY

 

Engineered by:

 

CHET HIMES

Assisted by:

STUART GITLIN

 

 

 

Another movie tune was hot this week in ’81—this time in the peak position on the Hot 100 Singles chart— from Grammy® and soon-to-be Oscar® winner Christopher Cross. His recording, co-written by Peter Allen, Burt Bacharach (his then soon-to-be wife) Carole Bayer Sager along with Cross, was in the first of three consecutive survey-phases on this chronicle. “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” knocked off “Endless Love” on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart after a lengthy nine weeks as the prime song in America. Here’s a live version of “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” on Warner Bros. Records from Christopher Cross.

This record won an Oscar® for Best Original Song for the writers; as well as a Golden Globe® for Best Original Song for the songwriters. The lyric, “When you get caught between the moon and New York City” was from a past collaboration between Peter Allen and Carole Bayer Sayer that was never released on a recording to the public. But it came to good use in this 45 RPM and Soundtrack cut. The song was contained in an LP called Arthur – The Album, also on Warner Brothers Records, featuring songs by the late Nicolette Larson, the group Ambrosia and Stephen Bishop. The Steve Gordon-directed film starred Dudley Moore (as Arthur Bach) Liza Minnelli (as Linda Morolla) and (Sir Arthur) John Geilgud (as valet Hobson) who died at the ripe old age of 96 in 2000. Also the movie’s director / screenwriter, Steve Gordon passed away ironically in New York City of a heart-attack just one year after the film Arthur was released. Moore refused to acknowledge a poorly made Arthur Part 2 in 1988. Dudley Moore died of a brain-disorder in Plainfield, NJ in 2002.

 

TOP 50 ADULT 

CONTEMPORARY

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘81

 

 

No.1

 

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY 

(Middle-Road)

45 RPM

 

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“ARTHUR’S THEME

(Best That You Can Do)”

(Peter Allen / Burt Bacharach / Christopher Cross / Carole Bayer Sager)

 

Flip-Side:

“MINSTREL GIGOLO”

 

 

CHRISTOPHER CROSS

 

WARNER BROS. Records49787

 

Produced by:

 

MICHAEL OMARTIAN

 

Executive Producer:

 

STEPHEN PALEY

 

Engineered by:

 

CHET HIMES

Assisted by:

STUART GITLIN

 

This was the last of four back-to-back survey-cycles as the leading 45 RPM on the Top 50 Adult Contemporary Singles chart for Christopher Cross’ “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” on Warner Bros. Records. (**See above.)

 

HOT

SOUL

SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘81

 

 

No.1

 

 

 

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“WHEN SHE WAS MY GIRL”

 

 

(Marc Blatte / Larry Gottlieb)

 

Flip-Side

“SOMETHING TO REMEMBER”

 



FOUR TOPS

 

CASABLANCA Record & Filmworks – 2338

  

Produced by:

 

DAVID WOLFORT for THE ENTERTAINMENT COMPANY

 

Executive Producer:

 

Charles Koppelman

 

On the Hot Soul singles listing this week in ‘81, Motown’s “Endless Love” was replaced after seven weeks (on this chart) at the zenith with a former Motown act, Four Tops with their third (or was it fourth) comeback—this time on Casablanca Records with “When She Was My Girl.” This was the second and final week as the prime 45 RPM on the Hot Soul list for the veteran vocal group. This was their 41st Hot 100 entry (it was No. 16 this week on the Pop side—heading for a peak position of No. 11) in the weeks ahead.



Four Tops only had two releases on Casablanca Records; “When She Was My Girl,” and a song called “Sad Hearts.” But it was that single’s B side that made lasting noise—only not on the Hot 100…yet. “I Believe In You And Me” was picked up by smart mobile-DJ’s who found that many people wanted that song for their wedding receptions by Four Tops. Levi Stubbs belted out this beauty that never made the Hot 100, and was, in essence, a Stubbs solo song, as the other three Tops were not on the vocal track. I defy you to not love this version.

Four Tops’ “I Believe In You And Me,” written by Sandy Linzer and David Wolfert, is one of those songs that had legs; as it was later a million-selling hit (No. 4 Pop) by Whitney Houston in early 1997.

 

 

THE

BIG 

ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 17, 1981

 

TOP

LPs & TAPES 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘81:

 

 

No.1

Pop

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

TATTOO YOU

 

 

THE ROLLING STONES

 

ROLLING STONES Records  16052

 

Produced by:


THE GLIMMER TWINS

 

 

Associate Producer:

 

 

 

Chris Kimsey

 

 

 

 

The Bad-Boys of Rock & Roll were on top of the U.S. Top LPs & Tape chart for the last time with Tattoo You, distributed in America by Atlantic Records on the groups’ own Rolling Stones Records. This was the fifth of nine concluding weeks at the summit of this directory. Indeed, the album was simply a bunch of mostly out-takes and left-over songs from the ‘70s, recorded in Paris and the Bahamas. Part of the reason for no new material on this collection was that Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were not on splendid terms and hadn’t sat down to write new tunes. They did agree to tour America and Europe, and needed an album of seemingly new songs to promote to the concert audiences. Improbably, the critics and the public liked the record, largely on the strength of “Start Me Up” which had been recorded during the Some Girls album sessions in ’78; originally as a Reggae-style song. The updated track was over three years old by the time it saw the light of day. And, in addition, the song was rehearsed, but not fully produced as far back at 1975 during the session for the album Black And Blue. “Start Me Up” was released in August as the first single from the set, and ended up reaching No. 2 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, kept out of the top slot by “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” by Christopher Cross and “Private Eyes” by Daryl Hall & John Oates. Here’s one of the most powerful records the Stones ever did.

The second single from Tattoo You was even older. “Waiting On A Friend” dates back to 1972 (**see above under Goats Head Soup) and because of that, the guitar player who replaced Brian Jones—Mick Taylor—was originally on the track, and even though he left the band in ’74, he wanted royalties—and somehow got them! However, in overdubbing for this “new” song, only Keith Richards’ guitar work is featured, even though Taylor’s replacement, and guitar player Ron Wood was in the group by the time Tattoo You was released. Wood IS featured in the video for the single (**see below) but not the actual audio track itself. The song got to No. 13 on the Hot 100. The building revealed in the video for “Waiting On A Friend” is right here in New York City on St. Mark’s Place; the same building featured on the cover of Led Zeppelin’s 1975 album Physical Graffiti.




That was the late Nicky Hopkins on the piano on “Waiting On A Friend,” along with Jazz great Sonny Rollins on the sax solo. A third single from Tattoo You was called “Hang Fire” and was released in the spring of ’82, just attaining the No. 20 position on the Hot 100. Mick Jagger wanted the LP to be called simply Tattoo. But he claims his Glimmer Twin Keith Richards put the word “YOU” on it, maddening Jagger.

    
SOUL

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘81:

 

 

No. 1

 

R&B

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

STREET SONGS

 

 

RICK JAMES

 

GORDY RecordsG8-1002

 

Produced by:

 

Rick James

 

This was the very last of a definitive 20 weeks as the prime album on the Hot Soul LPs register for Rick James, with his record Street Songs. The first single to show up from this LP was “Give It To Me Baby” on Gordy Records. That song just made it into the Top 40 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, but had recently enjoyed a five-week stay at the crest of the Hot Soul Singles chart back in June and July of ‘81. The Rick James album Street Songs reached a highly regarded No. 3 on the Top LPs & Tape chart as well. The following single from Street Songs was the everlasting testimonial to the talent of Rick James, at least on the POP side of the charts. “Super Freak” (No. 16 Pop) is his most remembered song; not just for the slightly decadent lyrics, but the supplement of the Temptations on the backing vocals. It’s super freaky, ain’t it?

James’ recording was ably sampled in 1990’s smash by MC Hammer, “U Can’t Touch This.” Despite the mainstream and eternal success of “Super Freak,” Rick’s first single for Motown (Gordy Records) was, in point of fact, his highest-charting Hot 100 single; “You And I” leaping to No. 13 out of the box as the introduction 45 RPM release back in ’78. “You And I” was No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles chart for two weeks that summer. The Rick James (bitch) album Street Songs sold over three million copies; helping a slipping Motown Records recoup some of its ‘60s & ‘70s luster in the early ‘80s. Rick James (originally from Buffalo, NY) had the distinction of being a member of a group called the Mynah Birds, along with Neil Young in Toronto, Canada in the late ‘60s. Later, James was infamously mired in drug use during his career, and died from his excesses of a heart-attack at age 56 in 2004.  

 

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert. 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

All content on this page is copyright Big Jay Sorensen and of its respective copyright owners.

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