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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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October 2nd, 2015
 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 9, 1965



HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

**********************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 12) 

“DO YOU BELIEVE IN MAGIC”

(John Sebastian)

Produced by: Eric Jacobson

A Product of: Koppelman–Rubin Associates

THE LOVIN’ SPOONFUL

KAMA SUTRA Records  201

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 5)

“YOU WERE ON MY MIND”

(Sylvia Fricker)

Produced by: FRANK WERBER for TRIDENT PRODUCTIONS

WE FIVE

A&M Records  770

******************************

No. 8 – (LW d9)

“BABY DON’T GO”

(Sonny Bono)

Arranged and Produced by: SONNY BONO

A YORK RECORDS PRODUCTION

Subsidiary of GREEN-STONE Enterprizes

SONNY AND CHER

REPRISE Records  0392

******************************

No. 7  (LW 8)

“YOU’VE GOT YOUR TROUBLES”

(Roger Greenaway / Roger Cook)

Produced by NOEL WALKER

Musical Director: LES REED

THE FORTUNES

PRESS Records  9773

******************************

No. 6  (LW 4)

“CATCH US IF YOU CAN”

(Dave Clark / Lenny Davidson)

Produced by: Dave Clark

THE DAVE CLARK FIVE

EPIC Records  9833

******************************

No. 5  (LW 6)

“THE “IN” CROWD”

(Gene Page) 

Produced by: ESMOND EDWARDS 

RAMSEY LEWIS TRIO

ARGO Records  5506 

******************************

No. 4  (LW 2)

“EVE OF DESTRUCTION”

(P. F. Sloan)

Produced by: LOU ADLER with P. F. SLOAN & STEVE BARRI

Sound Supervisor: BONES HOWE

BARRY McGUIRE

DUNHILL Records  4009 

******************************

No. 3  (LW 7) 

“TREAT HER RIGHT”

(Roy Head / Gene Kurtz)

Produced by: HUEY P. MEAUX

ROY HEAD and the TRAITS

BACK BEAT Records  546

******************************

No. 2  (LW 1)

“HANG ON SLOOPY”

(Bert Russell / Wes Farrell)

Produced by: BOB FELDMAN, JERRY GOLDSTEIN & RICHARD GOTTEHRER

THE McCOYS

BANG Records 506

******************************

 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“YESTERDAY”



(John Lennon / Paul McCartney)

 

Flip-Side:

“ACT NATURALLY”

 

 

THE BEATLES

 

CAPITOL Records5498

 

Produced by: GEORGE MARTIN

 

Musical Score by: GEORGE MARTIN & PAUL McCARTNEY


 

This song was recorded June 14, 1965 when Paul McCartney was about to turn 23 years old in a few days. Little did he know then, that “Yesterday” would become one of—if not the most performed songs of the 20th Century and beyond? With the assistance of producer, George Martin, Macca recorded his part simply with an acoustic guitar. Martin suggested adding strings to the song. At first, the future Sir Paul told producer and future Sir George that it would make the song to sound “saccharine” like Montovani. Ironically, on later recordings, the Beatles and Martin would use members of Montovani’s string players, all plucked from the London Symphony Orchestra. Giving in, McCartney allowed Martin to add a string quartet on June 17, 1965. Often, the backing players didn’t get a mention; but I’d like to simply tell you who those players were: Tony Gilbert on first violin, Sidney Sax on second violin, Kenneth Essex on viola along with Francisco Gabarro on cello. Listen to just the strings before we add McCartney’s singing and acoustic guitar to the track. Wait…it takes 16 seconds into the track before you hear what Martin & McCartney scored.

It’s been reported that Paul instructed the string quartet to not add vibrato (or pitch variation) to the notes; giving the track a unique sound. Now, let’s hear the finished product, albeit in a live setting.

McCartney still sticks to his story that he dreamt the melody. He even asked anyone who would listen in his circle of friends if they’d ever heard the song. Nope, they hadn’t. So, with just silly lyrics originally, and a working title of “Scrambled Eggs,” he began putting the song together after waking up one morning in early ‘65 and walking over to his piano to record this dream’s melody. Certainly, this composition has not only stood the test of time; but will be heard for centuries to come. I’ve read that McCartney’s voice is truly a remarkable instrument, as he had just finished doing the vocal track to the song (and B side of “Help”) called “I’m Down” where he virtually shrieked the lyrics. Imagine doing that, then switching gears and then singing the almost angelic “Yesterday?” The 45 RPM, with “Act Naturally” on the B side, sung by Ringo Starr, also charted in a peak position of No. 47. But this was only the third survey-period on the Hot 100 for “Yesterday,” debuting at No. 45, jumping last week to No. 3 and this week, it became the U.S.A.’s most important single. This was the first of four back-to-back weeks at the helm of the Hot 100 on Capitol Records.

 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65

No.1

 

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“I’M YOURS”



(Don Robertson / Hal Blair)

 

Flip-Side:

“(IT’S A) LONG LONELY HIGHWAY”

 

 

ELVIS PRESLEY

with the JORDANAIRES

 

RCA VICTOR Records47-8657

 

Produced by:

 

STEVE SHOLES

 

Recorded in Nashville by:

 

BILL PORTER & THORN NOGER

 

Your King of Rock & Roll was no longer much of a king by the time 1965 rolled around. In fact, Elvis Presley only had one Top 10 single in about a two-year span—and that song (No. 3 Pop) had been recorded five years prior called “Crying In The Chapel.” But it doesn’t end there. RCA Victor began to realize that the British Invasion not only slowed down many of the U.S. record industry’s American artists from gaining traction on the Hot 100; but they were willing to risk putting out older material regularly from Elvis. This week’s No. 1 song on the Top 40 Easy Listening singles listing featured a song that had been included on a three year-old LP from ’62 called Pot Luck. “I’m Yours” was a pleasant enough song, and was used in the current film Tickle Me. But, like “Crying In The Chapel” and other recent Presley releases, “I’m Yours” had been recorded way back on June 26, 1961!!

Record buyers generally had no clue the song was that old; and frankly, I bet most didn’t care. If you still liked Elvis (and there was still ample demand for his recordings) you grabbed this ballad. It was yet another million-selling single, and was backed with a Doc Pomus / Mort Shuman tune called “(It’s A) Long Lonely Highway” charting by itself at a “Bubbling Under” position of No. 112.

 

 TOP SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65

 

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 3)

“I WANT TO (DO EVERYTHING TO YOU)”

 

JOE TEX

 

(Joe Tex)

 

Flip-Side:

“FUNNY BONE”

 

Produced by:

 

BUDDY KILLEN

 

DIAL RECORDS – 4016

 

Joe Tex had his second No. 1 R&B single with “I Want To (Do Everything For You)” on the Dial Records label. Joe Tex won talent shows at Harlem’s Apollo Theater and was originally signed to King Records in 1955 (a year after he won the contests) as his mother wouldn’t allow him to get into a contract before he was 19 years-old. It took several record companies and nine exhausting years before Joe Tex had a mainstream hit; finally on Dial Records. He would remain with that label for over 11 years. Joe Tex was a Rogers, Texas native, thus; his stage name. Tex first showed up on the charts (in a minor way) as far back as 1960 on the Berry Gordy, Jr.-owned (pre-Motown) record label named Anna; named after another sister. Berry Gordy, along with Roquel Davis and yet another sister Gwen Gordy, co-wrote a song called “All I Could Do Was Cry (Part 1)”—but it was a dud; reaching only No. 102 on the “Bubbling Under” chart below the Hot 100. But someone else was also watching this guy, whose real name was Joseph Arlington, Jr.  In fact, this label (Dial) was begun in Nashville circa 1961, initially to promote Joe Tex by song-plugger, music publisher and producer, Buddy Killen who produced this record. Killen had several mis-fires in his efforts to make Joe Tex a star. But he finally succeeded; as his breakthrough 45 RPM release “Hold On To What You’ve Got” hit the Hot 100 just before year’s end in 1964 to become the label’s main attraction. During this survey-period in ’65, the 45 RPM was enjoying the first of three consecutive weeks commanding the Top Rhythm & Blues Singles listing for “I Want To (Do Everything For You.)” The song was sitting in the No. 46 slot on the Hot 100 during this survey-cycle; peaking at No. 23 a few weeks later. After his breakthrough Soul ballad hit in early ’65, this week’s crowning R&B single was Joe Tex’s second appearance on the Hot 100’s Top 40 as well with “I Want To (Do Everything With You.)”



Joe Tex’s biggest hits (million-sellers) would come later in the ‘60s and into the ‘70s, including: “Skinny Legs And All” (No. 10 Pop) in ’67, “I Gotcha” (No. 2 Pop) in ’72, perhaps his best known recording and “Ain’t Gonna Bump No More (With No Big Fat Woman)” in ’77 (No. 12 Pop) during the Disco craze. He remained with Dial Records for over a decade, but left for Epic Records with that sole Disco hit in 1977. Big Jay’s fave Joe Tex 45 RPM was called “Show Me” a rockin’ soul record from 1967 that reached No. 35 on the Hot 100 and (surprisingly) only No. 24 on the R&B register. I want to feature THAT song here too, just because it’s so damn good—and because I can. I defy you to say this ain’t got soul. Go ahead—“Show Me!”

I love that excitement in an entertainer. Interestingly, Joe Tex wrote every single entry that reached the Hot 100, with one exception; his very last hit about not wanting to bump with no big fat woman. That was co-written by the very guy who signed him to his new Dial Records label way back in ’61; Buddy Killen along with a guy named Bennie McGinty. Right after his biggest hit “I Gotcha” in ’72, Joe became a Muslim, renaming himself Joseph Hazziez. He left the music business after that Disco million-seller. Joe died at age 49 of a heart attack in August of ’82.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 9, 1965

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

 

No. 1

 

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

HELP!

 

(Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

 

 

 

 

THE BEATLES

 

 

CAPITOL RECORDS – 2386

 

 

Produced by:

 

George Martin

 

This one’s in colour! Ringo Starr once claimed, “If you look at pictures of us (during the filming of Help!) you see a lot of blood-shot eyes; they were red from the dope we were smoking.” Good thing the movie was in colour! And these were the clean-cut boys. The American release of Help! Original Motion Picture Soundtrack on August 12, 1965—a week after the Help! LP came out in the U.K.—was the chart-leader on the Top LPs listing in the U.S. this week in ’65, for the fifth of nine uninterrupted analysis-phases. The Capitol Records set is different from the U.K. version, which wasn’t truly a soundtrack over there; although it did include all of the songs in the movie and more. The U.S. adaptation only included the songs: “Help,” “The Night Before,” “You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away,” George Harrison’s “I Need You,” “Another Girl,” “Ticket To Ride” (a previously released single—No. 1 Pop) and “You’re Gonna Lose That Girl.” Over the years, I’ve grown quite fond of this John Lennon tune; recorded on February 19, 1965 at the EMI Studios at Abbey Road in just two fundamental takes and some overdubbing of voices and instruments. The Beatles did try to make a better reworked copy at the end of March of that year, but decided to go with this version.



George Harrison wasn’t too pleased with the filming of the outdoor sequences in Austria (as seen in the film with “Ticket To Ride” in the background, once saying, “They took us to Austria, took us up a mountain, gave us our boots (that no one ever laced up) gave us our skis, said ‘turn over – take one. Action! – and gave us a push.” The remainder of the U.S. soundtrack was crammed with score music, conducted and written by Ken Thorne (who died on July 9, 2014) plus instrumentals of Lennon/McCartney compositions, with a distinct spy-flick sound. Help! sold just over three million copies in the U.S.; a measly amount by several of their other albums’ standards. The British edition of the album Help! (featuring this week’s No. 1 song here in America this week, “Yesterday” **see above) was initially released on CD in the U.S. in 1987, and has had two other digitally re-mastered versions hit the record outlets and downloads since then. There were two other songs recorded during the sessions for Help! Those two were called “If You’ve Got Trouble,” and “That Means A Lot.” The first one was so bad, even the Beatles didn’t want it released. And the second was given to the recording artist P. J. Proby (James Marcus Smith) who had a minor hit with it in the U.K. Here’s the Beatles rare version of “That Means A Lot” from the sessions for HELP!

That’s a fairly decent song that we never got to hear during the hey-day of Beatlemania.

 

TOP SELLING R&B

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

 

No. 1

 

 (Last Week No. 1)

 

THE “IN” CROWD

 

 

RAMSEY LEWIS TRIO

 

ARGO RECORDS757

 

Produced by:

ESMOND EDWARDS

 

Engineered on location by:

 

Ed Green 

 

The album called The In Crowd by Ramsey Lewis Trio was released on Argo Records, a subsidiary of Chess Records; with the objective of using it as a Jazz label. The Ramsey Lewis Trio was, the Chicago-born namesake on piano, Eldee Young on bass and cello, plus Isaac “Red” Holt on drums. Young passed away in 2007. Those later two formed Red-Holt Unlimited after just one additional LP with Lewis, and were replaced in Lewis’ ensemble by bass player Cleveland Eaton and the later co-founder of Earth, Wind & Fire, drummer Maurice White. Maurice had been a session drummer at Chess Records in Chicago, and was the percussionist on the huge hit called “Rescue Me” by Fontella Bass. The In Crowd by Ramsey Lewis Trio was recorded live at a nightclub named The Bohemian Caverns in Washington, D.C. during three nights in May of ‘65. This Long-Player was in the fifth of an ultimate 12 non-consecutive weeks as the biggest album on the Top Selling R&B LPs chart. Here’s the entire version of the title track from this live LP. The single was substantially cut for Top 40 radio airplay. 

The song “The “In” Crowd” was written by Billy Page, the brother of the extremely talented arranger, Gene Page who later went on to bigger things working with many artists including the Maestro, Barry White on his hits. The Ramsey Lewis Trio album The In Crowd, was produced by a Jamaican-native and New York City-raised Esmond Edwards. He died in 2007. Ramsey Lewis Trio’s follow-up single to “The “In” Crowd” was another well-known song at the time; an instrumental remake (No. 11 Pop) of the McCoy’s recent Hot 100 No. 1 record, “Hang On Sloopy.” The song “The “In” Crowd” was already known by Top 40 and R&B listeners from a vocal version by the Dobie Gray, who passed away in 2011. Gray’s performance previously entered the chart in ’65, attaining the No. 13 slot on the Hot 100 on the tiny Charger Records label.

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 7, 1972

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘72:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 10) 

“POPCORN”

(Gershon Kingsley)

Produced by: BILL & STEVE JEROME for MTL Productions and R.E. TALMADGE & DANNY JORDAN

Arranged by: DAVE MULLANEY & JOHN ABBOTT

Engineered by: STEVE JEROME

HOT BUTTER

MUSICOR Records  1458

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 13)

“MY DING-A-LING”

(Chuck Berry)

Produced by: ESMOND EDWARDS for GRT Corporation  

 CHUCK BERRY

CHESS Records  2131

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 2)

“BLACK & WHITE”

(David Arkin / Earl Robinson)

Produced by: RICHARD PODOLOR for Three Dog Night, Inc.

THREE DOG NIGHT

DUNHILL / ABC Records  4317

******************************

No. 7  (LW 9)

“BURNING LOVE”

(Dennis Linde)

Produced by: JERRY WEXLER & TOM DOWD

Vocal Accompaniment by: J. D. Sumner & The Stamps

ELVIS PRESLEY

RCA VICTOR Records  74-0769

******************************

No. 6  (LW 8)

“USE ME”

(Bill Withers)

Produced by: BILL WITHERS with RAY JACKSON, JAMES GADSON, MELVIN DUNLAP & BENORCE BLACKMON

Arranged by: BILL WITHERS

BILL WITHERS

SUSSEX Records  241

******************************

No. 5  (LW 7)

“GO ALL THE WAY”

(Eric Carmen) 

Produced by: JIMMY IENNER

RASPBERRIES

CAPITOL Records - 3348 

******************************

No. 4  (LW 6)

“EVERYBODY PLAYS THE FOOL”

(Rudy Clark / James Ralph Bailey / Ken Williams)

Produced by: TONY SYLVESTER & LUTHUR SIMMONS, Jr.

Production Supervised by: BUZZ WILLIS – An Ingredient Production, Ltd.

Arranged and Conducted by: BERT DeCOTEAUX

THE MAIN INGREDIENT

RCA VICTOR Records  74-0731 

******************************

No. 3  (LW 4)

“BACKSTABBERS”

(Leon Huff / Gene McFadden / John Whitehead)

Produced by: KENNY GAMBLE & LEON HUFF Productions

Strings & Horns Arranged by: Thom Bell

O’JAYS

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL Records  3517

******************************

No. 2  (LW 5)

“BEN”

(Don Black / Walter Scharf)

Produced and Arranged by: THE CORPORATION™ (Alphonso Mizell, Berry Gordy Jr., Deke Richards & Freddie Perren)

MICHAEL JACKSON

MOTOWN Records 1207

******************************

 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 
“BABY DON’T GET HOOKED ON ME”



(Mac Davis)

 

 

MAC DAVIS

 

COLUMBIA Records45618

 

Produced by:

 

RICK HALL

 

Strings Arranged by:

 

JIMMIE HASKELL

 

 

 

Mac Davis once worked for the Chicago-based R&B record label Vee-Jay and later Liberty Records as a manager. The Lubbock, Texas native then plugged away for Nancy Sinatra and her company. He had rapidly become a successful tunesmith by the time this week’s biggest Hot 100 Singles chart-hit was at the high point of that listing with “Baby Don’t Get Hooked On Me” on Columbia Records. He wrote “I Believe In Music” a minor hit for Gallery after their success with a song called “Nice To Be With You.” The tune “I Believe In Music” is often tabbed as Davis’ signature song; as it has been recorded by assorted artists over the years as well as by Mac himself. Here’s Davis with his only No. 1 Pop hit for the last of three consecutive weeks on the Hot 100 with “Baby Don’t Get Hooked On Me.” The signature sound of the string section on the song was arranged by Jimmie Haskell and recorded at the Rick Hall FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. He was named Producer of the Year after this album was released.

“Baby Don’t Get Hooked On Me” had also been the top tune on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles chart for three uninterrupted survey-periods, ending last week; and was still strong at No. 2 on that chronicle during this seven-day chart-phase. Davis was able make good use of his asset with the 45 RPM “Baby Don’t Get Hooked On Me,” turning things into a TV late-night music show; and later, a weekly variety show. Davis was also a regular guest on other television talk programs. Mac Davis also wrote “A Little Less Conversation,” “Memories,” “Don’t Cry Daddy” and “In The Ghetto” all performed by Elvis Presley. You can also lay blame on Davis for the wishy-washy “Watching Scotty Grow” from Bobby Goldsboro. Davis was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2000 and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his music. Mac began a drama career after the hits dried up.

  

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘72

 

No.1

 

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 2)

 

 

“BLACK & WHITE”

 

(David Arkin / Earl Robinson)

 

Flip-Side:

“FREEDOM FROM THE STALLION”

 

THREE DOG NIGHT

 

DUNHILL / ABC Records  4317

 

Produced by:

 

 

RICHARD PODOLOR

for Three Dog Night, Inc.

 

 

Ok, so they were a cover/remake band. Many other acts had great careers doing that as well. And yet (despite their enormous success in the late ‘60s into the mid-‘70s) the band Three Dog Night is still not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. They covered and/or remade some great material in their recording careers. Three Dog Night held the No. 1 position on the Top 40 Easy Listening chart for this, the sole week in ’72 (after being No. 1 on the Hot 100 several weeks back) with a song that had roots all the way back to the ‘50s called “Black And White” on Dunhill/ABC Records. Their version was inspired by hearing a reggae interpretation of the song on a Dutch radio station while Three Dog Night was touring the Continent. The original song was motivated by the U.S. Supreme Court stopping segregation in America’s schools in 1954. The next year, Earl Robinson and David Arkin (yes, the father of actor Alan Arkin) wrote a lengthy work about the decision. Folky Pete Seeger laid down the first rendition, followed by Sammy Davis, Jr. But Three Dog Night’s re-worked adaptation was a remake of the song they heard by a group called Greyhound while in Europe. That band never had a chart hit in the U.S., but the Kings of remakes/covers took this to No. 1 and became their fifth million-selling 45 RPM.

Singer Danny Hutton got the lead vocal on this track. Three Dog Night was not known as an album band, but their LP’s did sell well because they had at least two hit songs on each Long-Player. “Black And White” was snagged from the Seven Separate Fools album; a bit of self-deprecating humor, as there were SEVEN members of the band, including the three singers. The follow-up single to “Black And White” was a song written by Dave Loggins (of “Please Come To Boston”-fame called “Pieces Of April” which rose only to the No. 19 spot on the Hot 100. The three singers—Hutton, Cory Wells and Chuck Negron—had just two more Top 10 hits; “Shambala” (No. 3 Pop) a quickly turned-around cover-version of a tune done by B.W. Stevenson (“My Maria”) with “Shambala” heard on a TV commercial in the recent past. The other was the circus-themed “The Show Must Go On” a cover of a song by Leo Sayer, their last million-selling single reaching No. 4 Pop. The album featured two other super songs called “Freedom From The Stallion” (the B side of “Black & White) and another called “Going In Circles,” made well-known by the Friends Of Distinction. Chuck Negron famously had profound drug issues and left the band. He recovered years later—remained sober—and wrote a best-selling book about his struggles. Both Cory Wells and Danny Hutton still portray the co-leads of Three Dog Night, with Negron performing separately to this day. I’d like to name the other members of the group, as in this case, Three Dog Night was not JUST the singers. They included: Mike Allsup on guitar, Floyd Sneed on drums, Jimmy Greenspoon (who died on March 11, 2015) on keyboards (his Godfather was comedian Jack Benny) and the late Joe Schermie on bass guitar who passed on March 26, 2002. Three Dog Night was one of the first bands to regularly fill outdoor stadiums in the early ‘70s until their original break-up in 1977. Did you know it was singer Danny Hutton’s then girlfriend who named the band way back in 1967?  She had seen a magazine article about dogs in Australia’s outback sleeping with the indigenous people (the number of animals depended on the temperature—in this case three) to keep the humans warm. Her name was June Fairchild, who died back in February of 2015. She is perhaps best known as the A-Jax girl in Cheech & Chong’s film, Up In Smoke. And ironically, she suffered from drug abuse for much of her adult life, leading to her demise.

 

BEST SELLING

 SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘72

 

No.1

 

R&B (SOUL)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“GET ON THE GOOD FOOT

—Part 1”

 

 

(James Brown / Fred Wesley /

Joe Mims)

 

Flip-Side:

“GET ON THE GOOD FOOT Part 2”

 

 

JAMES BROWN

 

POLYDOR Records  2751

 

SOUL I

JAMES BROWN—THE CREATOR

 

 

Produced and Arranged by:

 JAMES BROWN

 

It was not likely his first true million-selling single, but “Get On The Good Foot – Part 1” was the first CERTIFIED million-seller for the ‘The Hardest Working Man In Show Business’—in this case the Godfather of FUNK—in the last of four back-to-back weeks at the crest of the Best Selling Soul Singles chart this week in ’72. The 45 RPM was also No. 19 during this survey-cycle on the Hot 100 Pop singles listing; heading for a peak there at No. 18 next week. JB’s current album was No. 66 on the Top LPs Pop chart during this survey-period; but it didn’t include his current single. James Brown had been having hits since the end of 1958, and had reached the peak of his crossover appeal by the mid-to late ‘60s and continued his assault on the charts up until “Get On The Good Foot – Part 1.” Trouble brewed for the superstar when he oddly got behind Republican candidate for President, Richard Nixon, then running for his second term in ’72; this time against Democrat George McGovern. We all know Nixon won in a significant landslide; but that decision by Brown cost him exceedingly in record sales and ticket sales in the African-American community after this song led the Soul singles listing. But, you KNOW you’re a big star when your picture is placed on the 45 record labels, and everyone knows who it is.

Brown, of course, did recover his standing, becoming the purveyor of Funk music. But he began having I.R.S. issues and his music career had hit bottom in 1977; with his releases not even doing well on the R&B charts. The Godfather of Soul did make a comeback after being featured in films like The Blues Brothers and Rocky IV; plus, he had one final huge crossover hit from that Sylvester Stallone flick called “Living In America” written and produced by the late Dan Hartman (of “Instant Replay” and “I Can Dream About You”-fame.) Brown’s troubles weren’t quite done yet, as he spent time in jail on several well documented charges. After his release, “Mr. Dynamite” relentlessly toured all over the world trying to make up for lost time, and performed just a month before his death on December 26, 2006 due to congestive heart-failure caused by pneumonia at age 73.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 7, 1972

 

TOP

LPs & TAPE 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘72:

 

No. 1

 

Pop

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

CHICAGO V

 

 

CHICAGO

 

COLUMBIA Records  31102

 

Produced by:

 

JAMES WILLIAM GUERCIO

 

Chicago began tweaking their sound a bit by this, the fifth album on Columbia Records, and were riding high with what would become their first million-selling single, “Saturday In The Park, currently dropping down to No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles list; peaking at No. 3 a few weeks ago. Their album Chicago V was the groups’ first to be a one-LP set, after having double studio albums and one four-disc live set. Robert Lamm became (for now) the defacto lead songwriter with this album, featuring eight of his compositions out of the 10 on the record. Chicago V was the biggest album chart hit of 1972. Here’s “Saturday In The Park.”

While Lamm was the dominant songwriter at this time, it was rapidly becoming apparent that Peter Cetera was fetching enough to be the face of the band as a vocalist and bass player, and would become more prolific in his writing with forthcoming albums; eventually being asked to leave. The horn section still was in the forefront, but by their next few LPs, Cetera would contribute more lead vocals as well. Another single from the Chicago V album was “Dialogue Part I & II” which was edited down for 45 RPM release. The song was politically-charged as had some earlier tracks by Chicago. Here’s the entire LP version.

Basically, it was an observation of the trials and tribulations people were having in the early ‘70s; showing some ideas were negative and others very positive about the state of affairs in the U.S. and abroad. I have seen the band in concert too many times to count. I will tell you one of the unsung members of the band is former drummer Danny Seraphine who may well belong in the Top 5 of best rock drummers in existence. If you agree or disagree, let US have a “dialogue” about it by sending me an email at BigJaySorensen@gmail.com. I will get back to you. Chicago V also made its way to the R&B album chart in ’72—a testament to their blending of genres. If you go by Billboard Magazine’s stats, the group is the second most successful U.S. group in the rock era if you measure sales of both albums and singles…second to the Beach Boys. However; unconscionably, Chicago is NOT in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame despite their long list of achievements. 

 

 

*NOTE:

Billboard Magazine suspended publishing of the BEST SELLING SOUL LPs (R&B Albums) chart for several weeks from August 26 to October 7, 1972—so no SOUL albums were posted in that timeframe. I don’t have access to any other Soul LP listing from other publications at this time. IF someone wants to contribute to the cause so I can gain said items, I’d be happy to entertain a trade of goods and/or banner ads on this website. I came to the conclusion that the biggest SOUL album WOULD have been The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack -- Superfly by Curtis Mayfield, currently No. 8 on the TOP LPs & TAPE chart for this week.

 




THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

 

For the   Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 4, 1980

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80:

 

 


THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

************************************************************

No. 10 – (LW 11)

“XANADU”

(Jeff Lynne)

Produced by JEFF LYNNE

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN / ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA

MCA Records  41285

******************************

No. 9 – (LW 5)

“LOOKIN’ FOR LOVE”

(Wanda Mallett / Patti Ryan / Bob Morrison

Produced by: JOHN BOYLAN

Executive Producer: IRVING AZOFF

 JOHNNY LEE

FULL MOON / ASYLUM Records  47004

******************************

No. 8 – (LW 10)

“I’M ALRIGHT

(THEME FROM “CADDYSHACK”)”

(Kenny Loggins)

Produced by: KENNY LOGGINS & BRUCE BOTNICK for The Boardwalk Entertainment Co.

 

KENNY LOGGINS

COLUMBIA Records  1-11317

******************************

No. 7  (LW 12)

“WOMAN IN LOVE”

(Barry & Robin Gibb)

Produced by: BARRY GIBB, ALBHY GALUTEN & KARL RICHARDSON for BARRY GIBB Productions & KARLBHY Productions

Executive Producer: CHARLES KOPPELMAN for The Entertainment Company

BARBRA STREISAND

COLUMBIA Records  1-11364

******************************

No. 6  (LW 6)

“LATE IN THE EVENING”

(Words & Music by Paul Simon)

Produced by: PHIL RAMONE & PAUL SIMON

Engineered By: JIM BOYER

PAUL SIMON

WARNER BROS. Records  49511

******************************

No. 5  (LW 7)

“DRIVIN’ MY LIFE AWAY”

(Eddie Rabbitt / Even Stevens / David Malloy) 

Produced by: DAVID MALLOY

EDDIE RABBITT

ELEKTRA Records - 46656 

******************************

No. 4  (LW 4)

“GIVE ME THE NIGHT”

(Rod Temperton)

Produced by: QUINCY JONES for Quincy Jones Productions, Inc.

GEORGE BENSON

QUEST / WARNER BROS. Records  49505

******************************

No. 3  (LW 1)

“UPSIDE DOWN”

(Bernard Edwards / Nile Rogers)

Produced by: NILE ROGERS & BERNARD EDWARDS for The CHIC Organization

Conducted & Arranged by: BERNARD EDWARDS & NILE ROGERS

DIANA ROSS

MOTOWN Records  1494

******************************

No. 2  (LW 2)

“ALL OUT OF LOVE”

(Music by: Graham Russell – Lyrics by: Graham Russell & Clive Davis)

Produced by: ROBIE PORTER
Executive Producer: CLIVE DAVIS

AIR SUPPLY

ARISTA Records 0520

******************************

 No.1

 

Pop

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST”



(John Deacon)

 

Flip-Side:

“DON’T TRY SUICIDE”

 

 

QUEEN

 

ELEKTRA Records47031

 

Produced by:

 

QUEEN

(Freddie Mercury, Brian May, John Deacon & Roger Taylor

 

Co-Produced and Engineered by: MACK

 

 

This was the second No. 1 record in 1980 for Queen, following, “Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” released in late ’79. That song reached No. 1 for the week-ending February 23, 1980 and sat there for two total survey-cycles. But it’s week number one for Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust” sitting atop the Hot 100 singles chart. The song would remain in the pinnacle position for three uninterrupted survey-cycles. Performing most of the instruments on this track, the group’s bass player John Deacon also got the writing credit on this Elektra Records release. Taken from Queen’s current album The Game, the song sounded a bit like the Chic song “Good Times”—and there’s a reason. The late Bernard Edwards, the bass player and co-producer of Chic’s song claimed Deacon had spent time with them in the studio not long before recording “Another One Bites The Dust”. The “funk-rock” 45 was the best selling single the group had worldwide, selling an estimated 7 million copies. In the U.S.A., “Another One Bites The Dust” was their biggest hit ever; selling upwards of two million PHYSICAL copies here.

I must put an asterisk on the claim that “Another One Bites The Dust” was Queen’s best selling single as it sold over two million in America. Their hit “Bohemian Rhapsody” reached the Hot 100 in the U.S. twice, and the first time it was give the million-seller designation by the Recording Industry Association of America or RIAA. The second time it was released in 1992, after being featured prominently in the film Wayne’s World, it garnered an even higher position the second time around (first was No. 9) reaching No. 2 on the Hot 100 for one week. It gained yet another million-selling designation and because of the digital era, it was also legally downloaded 3.8 million times. So based on that criteria, “Bohemian Rhapsody” wins the contest. However, unexpectedly, “Another One Bites The Dust” reached the peak position of No. 2 on the Hot Soul Singles chart this week as well; a triumphant feat for a white band from the U.K. Queen’s current LP, The Game, was the principal LP on the Top LPs & Tape chart during this seven-day survey-stage. (**See below.) For this song, Queen was nominated for a Grammy® for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, but lost out to Bob Seger’s song “Against The Wind”.

 

TOP 50 ADULT 

CONTEMPORARY

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80

 

 

No.1

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY 

(Middle-Road)

45 RPM

 

 

(Last Week No. 2)


“NO NIGHT SO LONG”

 

(Richard Kerr / Will Jennings)

 

Flip-Side

“REACHING FROM THE SKY"

 

 

 DIONNE

WARWICK

 

ARISTA Records  0527

 

 

Produced by:

 

STEVE BUCKINGHAM

 

 

Dionne Warwick’s late ‘70s and early ‘80s comeback on Arista Records happened because of Barry Manilow and Ron Dante. Manilow and Dante had worked together early in Barry’s career, and when the Jersey diva signed with Clive Davis’ Arista Records, they decided she needed an update of her slick Uptown Soul sound. They achieved that with the bombastic-sounding “I’ll Never Love This Way Again” which was Dionne’s first million-selling single since “Then Came You” with the Spinners in ‘’74. That album also contained the hit “Déjà Vu.” The album that held her next hit was called No Night So Long. That happened to be the name of the single that was at the pinnacle of the Adult Contemporary Singles chart this week in 1980. The same songwriting team that had penned her comeback hit with Manilow and Dante at the helm “I’ll Never Love This Way Again” by Richard Kerr and Will Jennings, also wrote “No Night So Long.” Here she is on TV’s Solid Gold with her No. 1 Easy Listening record, which reached No. 23 on the Hot 100 Singles list.

The LP No Night So Long had a new producer named Steve Buckingham who started his production career with a little ditty named “I Love The Nightlife (Disco ‘Round)” by Alisha Bridges in ’78. He wound up producing major artists like: Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, Shania Twain, Ricky Scaggs and dozens of others. All told, Steve Buckingham has produced more than 200 albums.

 

HOT

SOUL

SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80

 

No.1

 

 

 

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“FUNKIN’ FOR JAMAICA”

 

 

(Tom Browne / Toni Smith)

 

Flip-Side

“DREAMS OF LOVIN’ YOU”

 



TOM BROWNE

 

GRP / ARISTA Records – 22895

  

Produced by:

 

DAVE GRUSIN & LARRY ROSEN for Grusin / Rosen Productions

 

Arranged by:

TOM BROWNE

 

Digitally Recorded and Mixed by: Larry Rosen

 

Jamaica, Queens—not the island nation of Jamaica, mon. Jazz/Funk trumpet player Tom Browne put together a great ensemble for this week’s No. 1 song on the Top Soul singles chart for the song, “Funkin’ For Jamaica” on the Arista distributed GRP Records. This was produced by the talented Dave Grusin and Larry Rosen’s label GRP Records.  Oddly, this didn’t even show up on the Hot 100 Singles listing, but was strong enough on the R&B list to be the chief song there for this, the first of four straight survey-periods. This infectious and happy song was all about Browne’s home-town of Jamaica, Queens, New York. This track came from his second LP called Love Approach.

That was the song’s co-writer Tina Smith a/k/a Thomasina Carrollyne Smith on the vocals helping out trumpet master Tom Browne. He got the idea for the tune after visiting his parents in his home section of Queens. “Funkin’ For Jamaica” was strong enough to also reach No. 9 (this week No. 11) on the Disco Top 100 chart, and No. 18 on the Pop Top LPs chart. Tom Browne was respected enough to have his album Love Approach as the current No. 4 Long-Player on the Soul LPs listing AND No. 2 LP on the Best Selling Jazz LPs chart this week as well. But Pop success eluded this artist and the song on the Hot 100; despite being the No. 1 Soul hit in the country. Other members of Browne’s studio ensemble included: Bernard Wright on keyboards, Bobby Brown on guitar, Marcus Miller on bass, Buddy Williams on drums, percussionist “Crusher” Bennett and co-producer Dave Grusin on piano. Grusin is perhaps best known as the writer of movie scores, including: On Golden Pond, The Goonies, Tootsie and The Graduate.   

 

THE

BIG 

ALBUMS

 

 

For the Chart-Week

ENDING

OCTOBER 4, 1980

 

TOP

LPs & TAPES 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80:

 

 

No.1

Pop

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

THE GAME

 

 

QUEEN

 

ELEKTRA Records  5E - 513

 

Produced by:


QUEEN

 

 

Co-Produced and Engineered by:

 

Reinhold Mack

 


Queen was on top of their game this week in 1980 with the chart-topping album The Game on Elektra Records. You had to see that first sentence coming. This album was the only Queen LP to hit the superior spot of the Top LPs & Tape chart, and was in that slot for five consecutive weeks; with this being the third of those seven-day survey-periods. It replaced Hold Out by Jackson Browne who was at the summit for just a week. The album featured two No. 1 Hot 100 singles. Freddie Mercury’s composition (the Rock-a-Billy-styled) “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” made the chart just before Christmas in ’79 and was on top of that directory for four weeks in the middle of February through the middle of March in 1980 and sold over a million copies. It was Queen’s biggest chart single, with regard to weeks at No. 1—if you don’t include the re-release of “Bohemian Rhapsody. The second single was sort of a dud. But I kinda liked the record. I played it on the radio when released. “Play The Game” which was the albums’ opening track didn’t even make the Top 40, stalling at No. 42; surprising after such a big hit from a major act. But what came next became one of the biggest hits of the decade sale-wise (**see above.) Bassist John Deacon wrote this copyright. He could likely retire on this one alone. A recent article on a news website says he is a multi-millionaire, and virtually nobody recognizes him in his native England. “Another One Bites The Dust” was No. 1 for “just” three weeks but it sold mightily and quickly. Legend has it that Michael Jackson convinced the band to release the song as a single. But let’s hear that single “Play The Game” and try to figure out why it wasn’t a big hit; sandwiched in between two monster singles.

A fourth single from the album The Game found it impossible to follow a monster hit like “Another One Bites The Dust.” “Need Your Loving Tonight” stopped at No. 44 on the Pop singles chart. The LP was recorded in Munich, Germany and produced by band members Freddie Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon along with co-producer Reinhold Mack. The LP sold over four million copies in America. The Game was such a winning album it also reached No. 8 on the Hot Soul LPs chart. Not bad for white boys from the U.K.

 

SOUL

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80:

 

 

No. 1

 

R&B

LP

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

GIVE ME THE NIGHT

 

 

GEORGE BENSON

 

RUTHLESS RECORDS / ATLANTIC RECORDS91275

 

This week’s No. 4 45 RPM on the Hot 100 Singles chart, “Give Me The Night,” was the title track on George Benson’s No. 1 Soul LP in U.S. during this survey-phase in 1980. It was also the No. 1 Jazz LP this week. Benson had already had six Hot 100 45 RPM entries to date; and with the seventh, “Give Me The Night,” he’d end up with the biggest single of his career. Two of those previous singles were Top 10: “This Masquerade” (No. 10 Pop & No. 3 Soul) in ’76 and a remake of the Drifters’ record, “On Broadway” (No. 7 Pop & No. 2 Soul) in 1978. Benson had his career best Hot 100 entry with the next single on Quest / Warner Bros. Records with mega-producer Quincy Jones at the helm of the LP and this magnificent piece of music. Here’s “Give Me The Night” from George Benson.

The title track from the LP was written by Rod Temperton who was a member of the band Heatwave (“Boogie Nights,” “The Groove Line” and “Always And Forever”) and had contributed songs to Michael Jackson, like: “Rock With You,” “Off The Wall,” future hits “Thriller” and also wrote songs like “Stomp” by the Brothers Johnson, “Sweet Freedom” by Michael McDonald and “Baby Come To Me” from Patti Austin with James Ingram. Benson’s Give Me The Night album was filled with some of the finest instrumentalists and singers around, including: Herbie Hancock, Lee Ritenour, George Duke, Greg Phillinganes, Louis “Thunder-Thumbs” Johnson (of the Brothers Johnson) and singers Patti Austin, Patrice Rushen and Jim Gilstrap. Another track from the LP Give Me The Night, “Moodie’s Mood” sung with Austin, was a standout track. All told, Benson won three Grammy® Awards due to the LP: Best Male R&B Performance, Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Male (for “Moody’s Mood”) and Best Instrumental Performance for a track called “Off Broadway.” In addition, producer Quincy Jones his arranger Jerry Hey won a Grammy® for Best Instrumental Arrangement for the LP track, “Dinorah, Dinorah.” In addition to being this week’s No. 1 Soul LP, the album Give Me The Night was currently No. 3 on the Pop Top LPs & Tape chart, and No. 1 on the Jazz LPs chart.        

Thanks for reading! Share this feature with a friend please, and BE BIG!

Big Jay Sorensen

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert. 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

All content on this page is copyright Big Jay Sorensen and of its respective copyright owners.

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