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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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September 4th, 2015

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

SEPTEMBER 6, 1969

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘69:

 

 



THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

 

***************************************************************************

No. 10  (LW 14)  "I'LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN"

(Lonnie Donegan / Jimmy Currie)

Produced by: PETER SULLIVAN

TOM JONES  PARROT Records  40018



******************************

No. 9  (LW 5)  "SWEET CAROLINE (Good Times Never Seemed So Good)"

(Neil Diamond)                                   

 Produced by: TOMMY COGBILL, TOM CATALANO & NEIL DIAMOND
Arranged and Conducted by: CHARLIE CALELLO



NEIL DIAMOND UNI Records  55136





******************************

No. 8  (LW 13)  "EASY TO BE HARD"  

(Galt MacDermot / James Rado / Gerome Ragni)                                                           

Produced by: GABRIEL MEKLER

THREE DOG NIGHT DUNHILL - ABC Records  4203




******************************


No. 7  (LW 9)  "LAY LADY LAY"

(Bob Dylan)                                                           

Produced by: BOB JOHNSTON

BOB DYLAN COLUMBIA Records  4-44926




******************************


No. 6  (LW 4)  "PUT A LITTLE LOVE IN YOUR HEART"

(Jackie DeShannon / Jimmy Holiday / Randy Myers)                             

Produced by: VME (George Vitale and DARGIN McWHORTER

Arranged by: VME (George Vitale and DARGIN McWHORTER) & JAMES LANGFORD)


JACKIE DeSHANNON IMPERIAL Records  66385



******************************

No. 5  (LW 6)  "GET TOGETHER" 


(Chet Powers) 

Produced by: FELIX PAPPALARDI 
Recording Supervisor: BOB CULLEN - A BSM Production

THE YOUNGBLOODS RCA VICTOR Records - 47-9752 


******************************

No. 4  (LW 7)  "GREEN RIVER"


(John C. Fogerty)                                                     

Produced and Arranged by: JOHN FOGERTY



CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL FANTASY Records  625 



******************************


No. 3  (LW 3)  "SUGAR, SUGAR"

(Jeff Barry / Andy Kim)

Produced by: JEFF BARRY


THE ARCHIES CALENDAR Records  63-1008



******************************


No. 2  (LW 2)  "A BOY NAMED SUE"

(Shel Silverstein)                                                 

Produced by: BOB JOHNSTON


 JOHNNY CASH  COLUMBIA Records 4-44944



******************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

"HONKY TONK WOMEN"



(Mick Jagger / Keith Richards)

 

Flip-Side:

"YOU CAN'T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT"

Charted separately in 1973--Peak Position, No. 42

 

THE ROLLING STONES

LONDON Records45-910

 

Produced by:

JIMMY MILLER 



Arranged by: 


THE ROLLING STONES

 

 

The Rolling Stones hadn't had a big hit single in over a year; but they stuck gold with their fifth U.S. No. 1 hit "Honky Tonk Women"--this week in its third of four back-to-back survey-stages on London Records. The "Bad Boys of Rock & Roll" hadn't had a chart-topping single in America since "Ruby Tuesday" hit the peak position on the Hot 100 back in '67. They did have hits in between, but only one reached the Top 10; "Jumpin' Jack Flash" (No. 3 Pop) in '68. The songs in-between were certainly worthy (depending on your point of view) including: "Let's Spend The Night Together"--the B side of "Ruby Tuesday" (No. 55 Pop) "Dandelion" (No. 14 Pop) backed with "We Love You" (No. 50 Pop with John Lennon on backing vocals) "She's A Rainbow" (No. 25 Pop) followed by the aforementioned "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and the single prior to this week's No. 1 song "Street Fighting Man" (No. 48 Pop)--all great songs in their own right. But "Honky Tonk Women" struck all the right chords right out of the box. But the opening sounds weren't chords at all. It was the sound of a drumstick hitting a cowbell, performed by producer Jimmy Miller. Here's a live version of "Honky Tonk Women" from a Madison Square Garden concert in the fall of '69.


 “Honky Tonk Women” started out as a sort of cowboy song, according to Keith Richards, while Keef and Mick (with their girlfriends at the time Marianne Faithful and Anita Pallenberg) were staying at a dude ranch in Brazil. Richards says he was just doodling on his guitar and the basics of the song were made in a "honky-tonk" manor. Once they got into the studio, the song morphed into a bluesy groove. The Stones did release a country-like version; calling it “Country Honk” on their 1969 album Let It Bleed. On the original version of “Honky Tonk Women,” Rolling Stones’ founder Brian Jones’ guitar tracks were erased after the Glimmer Twins fired him; with new licks filled by brand new member Mick Taylor, his first song performing with the band. Jones died in his swimming pool under mysterious circumstances on July 3, 1969, the same day the single was released in the U.K. Backing singers on the original 45 RPM track included: Raparata & the Delrons, the Brooklyn-based all-girl vocal group, Doris Troy of "Just One Look" fame and just signed to the Beatles record label Apple and another Brooklyn girl, Nannette Workman, credited as Nannette Newman.


 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘69

No.1

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

"A BOY NAMED SUE"

 

(Shel Silverstein)

 

Flip-Side:

“SAN QUINTON”

 

JOHNNY CASH

COLUMBIA Records  4-44944

 

Produced by:


BOB JOHNSTON



The "Man in Black" Johnny Cash had the biggest hit on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles special survey this week in ’69 with "A Boy Named Sue" recorded live at San Quentin Prison on Columbia Records. This was the last of two back-to-back weeks at the apex of that chart, and was in the third and final survey-cycle in the No. 2 slot on the Hot 100 Singles list. It was also the nation's biggest Country hit this week that summer. "A Boy Named Sue" was Cash’s first Top 30 Pop hit since “Ring Of Fire” in 1963.


In addition to being the biggest 45 RPM on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles special survey, "A Boy Named Sue" was also the No. 1 Hot Country Singles chart hit during this seven-day chart-phase in '69; kept from the summit of the Hot 100 by the Rolling Stones. That live performance of "A Boy Named Sue" was recorded in California at the prison on February 24, 1969, and was included on the Cash LP At San Quentin, released on June 4th, 1969. "A Boy Named Sue" was written by Shel Silverstein who had just recorded the song himself, produced by Country guitar virtuoso Chet Atkins along with Felton Jarvis who handled much of the output by Elvis Presley from ’66 until his death. It’s been said that long-time New York radio personality Jean Shepherd (A Christmas Story from 1983) inspired his friend Silverstein to write the song "A Boy Named Sue" based on the taunting Jean received as a kid due to his name being considered feminine. "A Boy Named Sue" was the biggest chart hit single ever for John R. “Johnny” Cash who died in 2003. Silverstein passed away in 1999. Your Big Jay met Johnny’s younger brother Tommy Cash when he was a guest on the TV show All Night with Joey Reynolds, produced in Times Square, where I was sidekick/announcer. Tommy Cash is also a fine interpretive country singer.

 

BEST SELLING

SOUL

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘69

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

"SHARE YOUR LOVE WITH ME"

 

(Deadric Malone / Al Braggs)

 

Flip-Side:

“PLEDGING MY LOVE / THE CLOCK”

 

 

ARETHA FRANKLIN

 

ATLANTIC Records  2650

 

Produced by:



JERRY WEXLER, TOMMY DOWD & ARIF MARDIN



The Queen of Soul was on a roll with yet another No. 1 song on the newly re-named Best Selling Soul Singles chart; the second of five ultimate weeks in that position. This R&B chart’s moniker changed frequently through the years. At the peak of the list was “Share Your Love With Me” on Atlantic Records, in the third of five concluding weeks in that position. The 45 RPM would reach No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles chart; it was No. 20 during this chart-phase. The song was actually a remake for Sister Soul. “Share Your Love With Me” was initially recorded by Bobby Blue Bland on Duke Records back in 1963 and included on his ’64 album Call On Me.


 "Share Your Love With Me" was written by Al “TNT” Braggs (an opening act for Bobby Bland) and Deadric Malone, one of dozens of aliases for Don D. Robey the owner of Peacock and Duke Records. He reportedly put his name on the writing credits to reportedly scam money from many of his artists. That was a fairly common practice in the Rhythm & Blues recording field in the ‘50s into the ‘60s. According to people like songwriter Jerry Lieber (Lieber & Stoller) Robey was a gangster who used violence and intimidation and murder—stealing the copyright for songs they wrote like “Hound Dog” for Big Mama Thornton. After Elvis Presley recorded that song, the song’s true writers fought for years to get proper credit much to the chagrin of Robey who had to eventually pay them royally. Aretha’s “Share Your Love With Me” was taken from the Queen’s LP called This Girl’s In Love With You, that featured the singles: “The Weight” (No. 19 Pop from 1969) with Duane Allman on slide guitar, a remake of the song from the Band, another remake with the Lennon/McCartney song “Elenore Rigby” (No. 17 Pop) and “Call Me,” the album’s only Franklin original song (No. 13 Pop) backed with “Son Of A Preacher Man” as the charted B side. An album track from Aretha’s album, the Lennon/McCartney song “Let It Be” was released even  before the Beatles single version came out on March 6, 1970. Their LP—the soundtrack for Let It Be—wasn’t released until May 8, 1970. Aretha’s version was on the loose for its debut on HER album on January 15, 1970. Lady Soul did it first for public consumption. That’s a pretty good trivia question and answer. Yes, you may use it Record Pigs; with permission, of course, from your Biggest Jay.


 


 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

SEPTEMBER 6, 1969

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘69:

 

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

AT SAN QUENTIN

 

JOHNNY CASH

 

COLUMBIA Records  9825

 

Produced by:

 

BOB JOHNSTON

 

 

This was the third of four consecutive weeks as the biggest album in America for Johnny Cash with At San Quentin, on Columbia Records. The song was No. 2 on the Hot 100 this week, No. 1 on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles special survey and No. 1 on the Hot Country Singles chart as well. (**See above.) On the Hot Country LPs chart, it was No. 1 for the sixth of 20 survey-periods; by far the biggest Country LP of the year. If you like Johnny Cash, here’s the original masterful LP in its entirety.


The original LP was actually a shorter version of the entire live show, but has been released several times with different running-orders through the years. There is a CD version which claims to be the full concert, but there are cuts, and reportedly features some addition audio not heard on any other release. Some reviewers say the original LP was the greatest album Cash ever released. Billboard Magazine reported that last week's show by Johnny Cash (with over 100,000 in attendance) was the largest show every seen in the state of Wisconsin at the State Fair. They also said ABC Television picked up the option for Cash's TV show for the next season. The magazine also reported this week that Cash had a newly formed public relations and promotion firm, with headquarters in Nashville.

 

 



BEST SELLING

SOUL 

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘69:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

HOT BUTTERED SOUL

 

 

ISAAC HAYES

 

ENTERPRISE (Stax) Records  1001

 

Produced by:

 

Al Bell, Allen Jones & Marvell Thomas

 

 

How about an album with just four songs on it? That’s what you got with Hot Buttered Soul from Isaac Hayes; the No. 1 album on the Best Selling Soul LPs chart for the third of 10 back-to-back weeks on the Stax Records subsidiary label, Enterprise. This album went on to sell over three million copies and was the beginning of keeping Stax alive for another few years after they lost affiliation with Atlantic Records. Two of the songs were the A and B sides of a seriously edited single. Both were from other songwriters. The A side was “Walk On By” (12:03 on the LP) the Burt Bacharach and Hal David song made famous by Dionne Warwick, and the B side was an interpretation of “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” (18:40 on the album) made popular by Glen Campbell and written by Jimmy Webb. Here’s the single edit of the long version of “Walk On By” from  Hot Buttered Soul.


Now here’s the B side, the entire un-edited “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” featuring Hayes doing what seemed like an ad-libbed slow rap.


The surviving members of the Bar-Kays (the rest of the band died along with Otis Redding in ’67) performed with Hayes on this album. Hot Buttered Soul was far more successful than his first full album for Stax (Enterprise) Records  Presenting Isaac Hayes. In 1968, when Stax got estranged from Atlantic Records, the company from Memphis released a ton of old and new product (in hopes of staying alive) simultaneously unleashed by orders from Al Bell the company leader. He told every artist on the roster to come up with new material. When Hayes’ 1968 improvised LP Presenting Isaac Hayes flopped (performed by the future ‘Black Moses’ along with just drummer Al Jackson, "the human metronome" and bassist Donald "Duck" Dunn both from Booker T & the M.G.’s) it led to the highly successful Hot Buttered Soul; largely because Hayes told Art Bell that he wanted total creative control this time. Isaac’s gamble paid off, as Hot Buttered Soul became one of the biggest albums of the year 1969; making Isaac Hayes an icon. Hayes died of a stroke near Memphis on August 10, 2008.





 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

SEPTEMBER 6, 1975

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

 

 


 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.

*************************************************************************

No. 10  (LW 4)  "ONE OF THESE NIGHTS"

(Don Henley / Glen Frey)

Produced by: BILL SZYMCZYK for Pandora Productions

                                                                                               

EAGLES ASYLUM Records  45257



******************************


No. 9  (LW 12)  "COULD IT BE MAGIC"

(Inspired by Prelude in C Minor - F. Chopin)

(Barry Manilow / Adrienne Anderson)

Produced by: BARRY MANILOW and RON DANTE

Arranged BARRY MANILOW and JOE RENZETTI



BARRY MANILOW ARISTA Records  0126



******************************

No. 8  (LW 10)  "FIGHT THE POWER (Part 1)"  

(Ernie Isley / Marvin Isley / Ronald Isley / O'Kelly Isley / Rudolph Isley / Chris Jasper)

Produced and Arranged by: ERNIE ISLEY, MARVIN ISLEY, RONALD ISLEY, O'KELLY ISLEY, 

RUDOLPH ISLEY and CHRIS JASPER



THE ISLEY BROTHERS T-NECK Records  2256


******************************

No. 7  (LW 11)  "FAME"

(David Bowie / John Lennon / Carlos Alomar)

Produced and Mixed by: DAVID BOWIE and HARRY MASLIN

Arranged by: DAVID BOWIE



DAVID BOWIE RCA VICTOR Records  10320



******************************

No. 6  (LW 6)  "JIVE TALKIN'"

(Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb)                                                           



Produced by: ARIF MARDIN

By arrangement with the ROBERT STIGWOOD ORGANIZATION



BEE GEES RSO Records  510


******************************

No. 5  (LW 5)  "HOW SWEET IT IS"

(Brian Holland / Lamont Dozier / Eddie Holland)

Produced by: LARRY WARONKER & RUSS TITELMAN

String Arrangement by: Nick DeCaro

Engineed by: LEE HERSCHBERG


 JAMES TAYLOR WARNER BROS. Records  8109




 ******************************

No. 4  (LW 7)  "AT SEVENTEEN"

(Janis Ian)

Produced by: BROOKS ARTHUR

Horns Arranged by: JANIS IAN



JANIS IAN  COLUMBIA Records 3-10154


******************************

No. 3  (LW 1)  "GET DOWN TONIGHT"

Produced by: HARRY W. CASEY / RICHARD FINCH



K.C. & the SUNSHINE BAND TK Records  1009




******************************

No. 2  (LW 2)  "FALLIN' IN LOVE"

(Dan Hamilton / Ann Hamilton)

Produced by: JIM PRICE



HAMILTON, JOE FRANK AND REYNOLDS PLAYBOY Records  6024


******************************


No.1

Pop

45 RPM


(Last Week No. 3)

 

"RHINESTONE COWBOY"

 

         (Larry Weiss)             

 

Flip-Side:

"LOVELIGHT"

 

 

GLEN CAMPBELL

 

CAPITOL Records  4095





Produced by:



DENNIS LAMBERT and BRIAN 

 

The Pop music charts have always been filled with a mix of styles, but during 1975, almost all genres of music co-existed with numerous No. 1 songs that year on the Hot 100 and even Easy listening lists. This week's top Hot 100 single replaced

         "Get Down Tonight" by K.C. and the Sunshine Band on top of the chart. This new No. 1 single was written by Larry Weiss (I know his sister) who originally recorded it himself. Glen Campbell (no stranger to the Pop and Country charts) laid down this track called for Capitol Records way before the title would also become a major motion-picture starring Sylvester Stallone and Dolly Parton. In fact, Weiss' own version of "Rhinestone Cowboy" did reach No. 10 on the Top 40 Easy Listening chart in '74, and was remembered by Capitol Records A&R (Artists & Repertoire) guy Al Coury, along with producers Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter, and even Campbell himself. They had all discussed the song as a possible album cut on Glen's next album. For comparison's sake, here's Larry Weiss and his original version of "Rhinestone Cowboy" on 20th Century Records from 1974.


One of Weiss' jobs was as a publisher for the recently deceased Bob Crewe; famous as the producer of the 4 Seasons during the '60s as well as a co-writer of many of their hits of that decade. Songwriter Weiss now considers "Rhinestone Cowboy" from Glen Campbell an "American anthem," although he wished he had the actual hit with it as the performer and the writer. The producers, Campbell and Capitol Records all thought it would be a strong cut, and released it as the LP's first single. Glen's version would eventually reach the pinnacle of the Pop Hot 100 Singles list for two weeks (this was the first of two) in 1975, had already been No. 1 for a sole week (for the week ending on August 2nd) and was on top of the Country list for three survey-periods. This week it was No. 2 after a two-week run at the top, and would return to that apex for one more survey-cycle.

Arkansas native Glen Campbell has had a storied career. First as member of a small family combo, then a backup musician and one of the most sought after guitar-slinging studio cats in L.A. He became a superstar Country-crossover recording artist as a vocalist. Glen first recorded in 1961 with a No. 62 Hot 100 single “Turn Around, Look At Me” that was covered much more successfully by the Vogues in ’68. The song “Gentle On My Mind” (written by John Hartford) won Grammy® Awards for Best Country Record, Best Country Song and Best Country Male Vocal. Campbell recorded several songs penned by Jimmy Webb, including Grammy® winning songs like “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” and his first million-selling single, “Wichita Lineman” (my personal fave) in late ’68 into early ’69. Later came “Galveston” another Webb tune. “Rhinestone Cowboy” was kind of a surprise to everyone, as Campbell hadn’t had a major hit since 1969; though he was a chart regular. “Rhinestone Cowboy” brought him back into the limelight in a big way. Less than two years later, Campbell took a song written by New Orleans-legend Allen Toussaint to the top of the Hot 100 one more time with “Southern Nights” in ’77. Glen retired from the music business after a farewell tour and (as of this writing) is now being cared for in a health-care facility with late stages of Alzheimer’s disease.



 

TOP 50

EASY LISTENING

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75

No.1

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM


(Last Week No. 4)

 

 

"SOLITAIRE"

 

(Neil Sedaka / Phil Cody)

                                                                                      

Flip-Side:

“LOVE ME FOR WHAT I AM”

 

CARPENTERS


A&M Records  1721

 

Produced by:

Richard Carpenter



Associate Producer:

Karen Carpenter

Arranged and Orchestrated by:


Richard Carpenter


Richard Carpenter doesn't get the credit he deserves, as most of the adulation for the brother and sister act Carpenters went to the singer and sometimes drummer Karen. But frankly, without his lush orchestrations, vocal arrangements and production, it is unlikely (as a team) they would have had the immense success so cherished by millions of fans. They may not be considered "In" by some standards, but their record sales prove otherwise. I'm sure there are tons of closet Carpenters fans all over the world. This week's No. 1 Top 50 Easy Listening Singles special survey was topped by "Solitaire," written by Neil Sedaka and Phil Cody. The song had been included in Sedaka's album called Solitaire in 1972, recorded with members of 10cc at their own studio. Sedaka was still successful in the U.K. even though his following in the U.S. had waned because of the British Invasion! The song "Solitaire" was covered in '72 by Petula Clark and a guy named Tony Christie. However, the first single for the song was from the British Invasion band from Liverpool; the Searchers. It didn't chart in the U.S. But I remember hearing Neil Sedaka's version...I may have even played it on the radio circa '74 right around the time of his comeback that year with "Laughter In The Rain." So let's compare his original to Carpenters hit version of "Solitaire."

Wow, that could have been a monster hit had Harry Nilsson recorded it as a single. It's similar to "Without You" isn't it? I also remember a version by Andy Williams getting played on the radio in '74. Sedaka's version also was re-released on his comeback album Sedaka's Back on Elton John's Rocket Records. Ok, so now here's the No. 1 single on the Top 50 Easy Listening Singles special survey this week in '75, peaking at No. 17 on the Hot 100 from Carpenters.

Karen Carpenter sang her heart out on the pathos-filled ballad in a different key than Sedaka's original rendition. I just love this song for some reason. I hope you did too. Carpenters didn't have many more big hits after this one, partly because times changed by the mid-'70s with less of a demand for "soft rock" material. Karen and Richard still had a few Easy Listening hits in them, including a remake of "There's A Kind Of Hush (All Over The World)" (No. 12 Pop and No. 1 Easy Listening) "I Need To Be In Love" (No. 25 Pop & No. 1 Easy Listening) and their final true hit, "Touch Me When We're Dancing" (No. 16 Pop and No. 1 Adult Contemporary) as that charge changed names by '81. Sedaka did OK too in the mid-to-late '70s with hits like: "The Immigrant," about John Lennon's saga for U.S. citizenship, "Bad Blood" (No. 1 Pop) with Sir Elton John, and a slow remake of his own 1962 No. 1 record, "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do" (No. 8 Pop & No. 1 Easy Listening) in early '76. Sadly, we lost Karen Carpenter in '83 of complications from anorexia nervosa at age 32.

 

 

 



HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75

No.1

R&B

45 RPM


(Last Week No. 4)

 

"HOW LONG

(BETCHA GOT A CHICK ON THE SIDE"

 

(Anita Pointer / Ruth Pointer** / June Pointer / Bonnie Pointer / David Rubinson)

**Some copies omit Ruth Pointer's name as a co-writer; others omit Bonnie's name. Still others add the name of Tom Salisbury, the arranger.

 

Flip-Side:

“EASY DAYS”

 

THE POINTER SISTERS


ABC / BLUE THUMB Records  265

 

Produced by:



DAVID RUBINSON and FRIENDS, Inc.



Arranged by:

TOM SALISBURY


The Pointer Sisters had their first and only No. 1 Hot Soul (R&B) chart hit in their entire career with "How Long (Betcha' Got A Chick On The Side)" on ABC / Blue Thumb Records for the first of an ultimate two weeks in '75. This track reached No. 20 on the Hot 100, and was in the No 29 slot this week on the Pop listing. The song didn't sound like anything else on the radio at the time; a quite refreshing thing to be honest with you. All four Pointer sisters were still with the group at this time: Anita, Bonnie, Ruth, and June. If you can put up with the banter, here are the Pointer Sisters with a tedious interview with Don Cornelius before they finally get to the song, "How Long (Betcha' Got A Chick On The Side)" on TV's Soul Train.


The Pointer Sister went on to have a huge career after Bonnie Pointer left the act for a solo career. Their big hits included: "Yes We Can Can" (No. 11 Pop No. 12 Soul) in '73 as their debut single on the Jazz label Blue Thumb, "Fairytale" (No. 13 Pop & No. 39 Country) which became a Grammy® winner for Best Country Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group for 1974. Their first major crossover hit was a remake of the Bruce Springsteen song "Fire" (No. 2 Pop for two weeks) "He's So Shy" (No. 3 Pop) "Slowhand" (No. 2 Pop for three weeks) "Automatic" (No. 5 Pop) "Jump (For My Love") (No. 3 Pop & another Grammy® winner for Best Pop Vocal Group Performance) a re-release and re-mix of "I'm So Excited" (No. 9 Pop) "Nuetron Dance" (No. 6 Pop) included in the Eddie Murphy film Beverly Hills Cop in '84. Their last charting song on the Hot 100 was "Be There" (No. 42 Pop) included on the next entry into the Eddie Murphy film catalog, Beverly Hills Cop II in '87. June Pointer passed away from cancer in 2006.



THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

SEPTEMBER 6, 1975

 

TOP LPs 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

 

No. 1

Pop

LP


(Last Week No. 3)

 

RED OCTOPUS


JEFFERSON STARSHIP


GRUNT (RCA) Records  0999

 

Produced by:

 

JEFFERSON STARSHIP and LARRY COX

 

Strings and Horn Arrangements by:

 

DAVE ROBERTS

 

Now that Marty Balin was successfully entrenched as the lead songwriter and singer in the latest incarnation of Jefferson Starship, Red Octopus ended up being the most successful chart album of any version of Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship or just plain Starship. This week, the album was in the first of two non-consecutive survey-phases as the prime LP in the U.S.A. Jefferson Airplane was notoriously a psychedelic band from the beginning in the San Francisco Bay area in the mid-to-late '60s. Their early hits included, '67's "Somebody To Love" No. 5 Pop) and "White Rabbit" (No. 8 Pop) 1969's "Volunteers" (No. 65 Pop and included in the first Woodstock triple LP recorded live at the festival in August of that year) and not much after that as the Jefferson Airplane. Steadily, members left and new ones entered with little success as the '60s became the early '70s. A name change was in order, as the group had splintered into many other bands. The name was altered to Jefferson Starship by '74, and at first it seemed that the rocket ship had sputtered out. After one dud called "Ride The Tiger," Marty Balin took charge of the majority of the writing and what was left of this new version of the group for the album Red Octopus. The LP included a long version of "Miracles" which was a bit too nerve-wracking for the record company to release as a single in its long form; mostly due to sexual references that was a tad too hot to handle at that time. However, FM rock stations (including the one I was on not long after the LP's release) played the long version while safer stations played the just over three minute edited single. That version became the biggest hit up to that date for the band beginning with Jefferson; reaching No. 3 for three weeks on the Hot 100. "Miracles" was rapidly climbing that listing; currently at No. 50 after just three weeks. Here's a live version of "Miracles" from '75.

Grace Slick was relegated to backing vocals for the demonstrative Balin; but you could still recognize her very strong voice on the track. Plus, some of the holdover sound of the '60s still resonated in this ensemble; as some of the tunes were a bit spacey. Other members of this version of the group included: Balin and Slick, along with Paul Kantner on guitar, Craig Chaquico on vocals, Papa John Creach on electric violin, David Freiburg on keyboards and bass, Pete Sears on bass, keyboards and synthesizers and John Barbata on drums. A follow-up single written by Slick and Sears bombed. Their next album called Spitfire was a similar LP; yet it didn't do as well, but did reach No. 3 on the Top LPs chart. That album spawned the single "With Your Love" which managed to garner the No. 8 peak slot on the Hot 100. The hits continued after a year off the road with another album called Earth, featuring the singles "Count On Me" (No. 8 Pop) and "Runaway" (No. 12 Pop) both mid-tempo songs. Marty Balin left the band, and Grace Slick was dealing with substance issues and also left for a time. A new lead singer Mickey Thomas (who sang lead on "Fooled Around And Fell In Love" by Elvin Bishop) appeared in time for the '79 album Freedom At Point Zero, featuring the strong rock song "Jane" (No. 14 Pop) and a another dud follow-up. Their first album of the '80s was highlighted by the tune "Find Your Way Back" (No. 29 Pop) with some minor hits to follow. Along came 1985, and the outfit wanted to continue, but founding Jefferson Airplane member Paul Kantner  filed a lawsuit against that act, and prevented the words Jefferson or even Airplane from being used unless all of the remaining members of that original partnership agreed. The remaining members finally whittled the name down to just plain Starship. With this new moniker and line-up in '85, they had some monster hits with their first album Knee Deep In The Hoopla, including: "We Built This City" (No. 1 Pop) followed by their second No. 1 Pop record, "Sara" both featuring Mickey Thomas on lead vocals. Starship had one more No. 1 song in them called "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now" featured in the film Mannequin with Kim Catrell and Andrew McCarthy and prominently featuring Grace Slick back as co-lead vocalist. Starship had a couple more songs to round out their recording careers with "It's Not Over ('Til It's Over)" (No. 9 Pop) and their last hit of any significance (No. 12 Pop) in '89 called "It's Not Enough." Slick retired from the music business and Mickey Thomas was seriously injured in a brawl in '89 while on tour in Pennsylvania with band member Donny Baldwin (another alum from Elvin Bishop's group) resulting in the drummer being fired from Starship. Thomas still fronts a live act called Mickey Thomas' Starship. Papa John Creach died in 1994 at age 76. The original Jefferson Airplane reunited in '89 (minus drummer Spencer Dryden who died in 2005) for a brief time. 

 

SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP


(Last Week No. 5)

 

NON-STOP


B.T. EXPRESS

ROADSHOW (SCEPTER) Records  41001

 

Produced by:

Jeff Lane


Brooklyn Transit a/k/a B. T. Express had the biggest Soul LP in the nation this week in '75 called Non-Stop on Roadshow Records, a subsidiary of Scepter Records. That company was one of the first to jump on the fast moving Disco bandwagon in the mid '70s. That decision may have hastened the labels' demise by the year of the Bi-Centennial. However, B. T. Express couldn't be stopped just yet as the album featured their third Hot 100 hit "Give It What You Got" (No. 40 Pop) quickly followed by the flip-side of the 45 RPM release "Peace Pipe" (No. 31 Pop) with both tracks reaching the No. 5 position (separately) on the Hot Soul Singles special survey in '75.
I'll feature both songs here. Better get your dancin' shoes on. First, here's "Give It What You Got."

Ya better keep those platform shoes on as here's "Peace Pipe" from B. T. Express.

"Peace Pipe" made the chart within a month of "Give It What You Got" as the other side of the single exploded in the Disco clubs all around NYC. However; B. T. Express' biggest hits had already happened in '74 into early '75. Their first hit was a million-selling crossover smash called "Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)" (No. 2 Pop for two weeks) & No. 1 Soul for a sole survey-period. Their follow-up 45 RPM was called "Express" and that too sold over a million; reaching No. 4 on the Hot 100 and another chart-topping tune on the Hot Soul Singles listing. Their album also called Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)" was also a big crossover, as it gained the peak position of No. 2 on the Top LPs list and No. 1 on the Soul LPs chart. It also reached No. 5 on the Disco chart. After the demise of Scepter Records, B. T. Express signed a deal with Columbia Records, but couldn't regain their groove, as their last Pop chart record only got to No. 52 called "Can't Stop Groovin' Now, Wanna Do It Some More." While with Columbia Records, they did have a couple of decent albums landing on the Soul LPs chart; but little Pop success. An alum of the band went on to solo fame. Keyboard player Michael Jones was renamed Kashif and became a techno-funk singer, songwriter and producer.

 

 



THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

SEPTEMBER 12, 1987

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

 

***************************************************************************

No. 10  (LW 17)  "I HEARD A RUMOUR"
(featured in the Motion Picture Soundtrack DISORDERLIES)

(Sarah Dallin / Siobhan Fahey / Karen Woodward / Mike Stock / Matt Aitken / Peter Waterman)

Produced by: MIKE STOCK, MATT AITKEN & PETER WATERMAN for PWL Productions


BANANARAMA  LONDON Records  886-165-7

******************************
No. 9
  (LW 3)  "WHO'S THAT GIRL"

(Madonna / Patrick Leonard)

Produced by: MADONNA and PATRICK LEONARD

MADONNA SIRE Records  28341


******************************

No. 8  (LW 11)  “WHEN SMOKEY SINGS”    

(Martin Fry / Mark White)

Produced by: MARTIN FRY, MARK WHITE & BERNARD EDWARDS

ABC MERCURY Records  888 604-7

 

******************************

No. 7  (LW 10)  "DOING IT ALL FOR MY BABY"                         

(Phil Cody / Michael Duke)

Produced by: HUEY LEWIS and the NEWS

HUEY LEWIS and the NEWS CHRYSALIS Records  43143



 ******************************

No. 6  (LW 7)  "CAN'T WE TRY"

(Dan Hill / Beverly Hill)

Produced by: HANK MEDRESS and JOHN CAPEK
For THE ENTERTAINMENT MUSIC COMPANY

DAN HILL (Duet with VONDA SHEPPARD) COLUMBIA Records 07050


******************************

No. 5  (LW 4)  "ONLY IN MY DREAMS"

(Deborah Gibson)

Produced by: FRED ZARR for BiZarre Music, Inc.

Executive Producer: DOUG BREITBART
Arranged by: DEBBIE GIBSON & FRED ZARR

DEBBIE GIBSON ATLANTIC Records  89322



 
****************************

No. 4  (LW 8)  "HERE I GO AGAIN"

(David Coverdale / Bernie Marsden)

Produced by: KEITH OLSON for POGOLOGO Productions
On behalf of WHITESNAKE OVERSEAS Productions, Ltd.

WHITESNAKE GEFFEN Records 28339



 
******************************

No. 3  (LW 5)  "DIDN'T WE ALMOST HAVE IT ALL"

(Michael Masser / Will Jennings)

Produced by: MICHAEL MASSER
Executive Producer: CLIVE DAVIS

Vocal Arrangement: Whitney Houston

WHITNEY HOUSTON ARISTA Records  9616



 ****************************

No. 2  (LW 2)  "I JUST CAN'T STOP LOVING YOU"

(Michael Jackson)

Produced by: QUINCY JONES

Co-Produced by: MICHAEL JACKSON

MICHAEL JACKSON (backing vocal by Siedah Garrett) EPIC Records
07253


****************************

 

 No.1

Pop

45 RPM


(Last Week No. 1)

 

"LA BAMBA"

 

(Arranged and Adapted by Richie Valens)

 

Flip-Side

“CHARLENA”

 

 

LOS LOBOS

 

SLASH (WARNER BROS.) Records  28336

 

Produced by:

 

MITCHELL FROOM

 

 

You're in the third and final survey-phase for "La Bamba" from Los Lobos as the prime 45 RPM on the Hot 100 on Slash / Warner Bros. Records this week in '87. The original hit was recorded and adapted from the traditional Mexican song by Richie Valens in 1958. Valens, as you know, was killed just over a month after his version of "La Bamba" was climbing the charts; ultimately attaining the No. 22 position on the Hot 100. His version of the song is in the Grammy® Hall of Fame. His recording featured the drums of Earl Palmer, and the bass guitar playing of Carol Kaye (both members of the so-called ‘Wrecking Crew’ from the L.A. music scene; who both played on hundreds, if not thousands of recording sessions. It turns out that Valens barely knew what he was singing about, as his speaking, yet alone singing Spanish was minimal. He only knew the song from family parties he attended as a child. He died at age 17 along with Buddy Holly and J.P. Richardson (and the pilot) in a plane crash in Iowa on what’s now referred to as “The day the music died.” But this update version by the Los Angeles-based group Los Lobos went all the way to the apex of Pop music's most coveted spot; No. 1 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. The five-man band Los Lobos, had only one minor hit before being asked to record the track from the film also called La Bamba, starring Lou Diamond Phillips as Valens. "Will The Wolf Survive" lay low on the Hot 100; just reaching No. 78 in 1985. But two years later, they were on top of the world.

Los Lobos (which translates to mean the Wolves in English) roots are in East L.A. They started out doing cover versions of rock songs, but were convinced to be able to make it as a recording act they’d have to do something different. That difference was performing the music they heard as kids; traditional Mexican tunes. Their re-creations of Valens’ songs for the soundtrack put them in front of mainstream audiences worldwide. The flip-side of the original single by Richie Valens was actually a bigger hit at the time, with “Donna” reaching the No. 2 position on the Hot 100. It didn’t hurt Los Lobos one bit that the film about Richard Steven Valenzuela was a box-office smash in 1987. Writer and director Luis Valdez wanted new original music used in the production instead of using the versions recorded in the ‘50s. The band Los Lobos got the nod to re-record the so-called wedding song that originated in Veracruz, Mexico.

HOT

ADULT 

CONTEMPORARY

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87

 

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY 

(Middle-Road)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)


"I JUST CAN'T STOP LOVING YOU"

 

(Michael Jackson)

 

Flip-Side

“BABY BE MINE"

 

 

 MICHAEL JACKSON 


(Duet with SIEDAH GARRETT)

 

EPIC Records  07253

 


Produced by:

QUINCY JONES


Co-Produced by:


MICHAEL JACKSON



Sometimes, mid-tempo ballads are not the smartest choice to be the first single from an album. But after Thriller, it appeared no matter what Michael Jackson did, it was the right move. The initial single from the album BAD was "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" with backing vocals from Siedah Garrett, who co-wrote "Man In The Mirror" with Glen Ballard; the fourth single and fourth No. 1 from BAD. This was the third and final survey-period for "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" in the principal spot on the Hot Adult Contemporary singles listing. The song would be No. 1 next week on the Black Singles chart for just that survey-cycle and it was also about to storm ahead of "La Bamba" on the Hot 100 Pop singles register for just one week during the next survey-phase. Ok, so the song wasn't a "Billie Jean," but it proved that MJ was still the King of Pop.

 
The reason Siedah Garrett was used on the track, was because after Quincy Jones and Michael wanted Barbra Streisand or Whitney Houston on the track--and both declined--they went with someone who had been singing backing vocals for the album BAD. Sometimes being in the right place at the right time is key. Garrett didn't have much time to think about it, as she had no idea her voice was the one picked until the day of recording her vocal track. She recorded a Spanish version and a French version of "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" that was included as just one of the bonus tracks on a 25th Anniversary release of the album re-titled Bad 25 in 2012 that also included demos and live versions of songs on the original LP/Cassette/CD.

 

BLACK SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87

 

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

"LOVE IS A HOUSE"

 

(Martin Lascelles / Geoff Gurd / Gina Foster)

 

Flip-Side

"LOVE IS A HOUSE" (INSTRUMENTAL)

 



FORCE M.D.'S


TOMMY BOY Records – 28300

  

Produced by:

 

MARTIN LUCELLES and GEOFF GURD

For DE-MIX Productions, Ltd.

 

Force M.D.’s' (the M.D. standing for Musical Diversity) first hit on the POP Hot 100 Singles chart was from the all-Rap musical film shot mostly in the Bronx called Krush Groove titled “Tender Love,” with the "quiet-storm-style" record reaching No. 10 on that list. They included originally wanted to use the name Force MC’s but decided to go with the M.D.’s. Doo-Wop-styled vocal harmonies (in addition to rap beat-box sounds) was in their arsenal. A year and a half later, the R&B vocal group from Staten Island struck again with “Love Is A House.” This single didn’t make much noise on the Pop side, garnering the lowly No. 78 spot at its peak. But looks can be deceiving, as “Love Is A House” ascended to the summit of the Black Singles chart, for this, the first of two concurrent survey-periods on Tommy Boy Records. This was Force M.D.'s third Top 10 45 RPM on the Black Singles chart and their last recording to be included on the Hot 100 register.

 "Love Is A House" was from the Force M.D.’s album called Touch and Go. Force M.D.'s started out singing in Times Square on the streets (I hope they had clothes on) as well as for captive audiences on the Staten Island Ferry to and from Manhattan. They had the added benefit of having the red-hot team of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis write and produce “Tender Love” from their own album Chillin’ which was released on Warner Bros. Records due to its inclusion in Krush Groove flick. The group members included: brothers Stevie and Antoine Lundy, Jesse Lee Daniels, Trisco Peterson and Charles “Mercury” Nelson. "Mercury" died of a heart-attack in 1995 at the age of 30. Antoine Lundy died of ALS a/k/a Lou Gehrig’s disease in 1998.

 


 THE

BIG 

ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week ENDING

SEPTEMBER 12, 1987

 

TOP POP

ALBUMS 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:

 

No.1

Pop

LP


(Last Week No. 2)

LA BAMBA

Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

 

PERFORMED BY:

Los Lobos

Bo Diddley

Howard Huntsberry

Brian Setzer

and

Marshall Crenshaw


 

SLASH (WARNER BROS.) Records  25605

 

 

Album Co-coordinators:

 

 

JERRI LAUREDSEN and MARY LOU EALES

 


Executive Producers - Album:

 

 

JOEL SILL and TAYLOR HACKFORD

 

 

Los Lobos performed the first six songs on the Soundtrack album for the motion picture La Bamba; No. 1 this week on the Top Albums chart on Slash/Warner Bros. Record; the first of a two-week stint at the crest. In addition to the title track to open the proceedings (**see above) they also remade five other songs originally performed by Richie Valens: his first A side from late 1958, "Come On Let's Go," along with "Ohh, My Head," "We Belong Together," "Framed" (the B side of "Come On Let's Go") and "Donna" the A side to "La Bamba." Here's Los Lobos with "Come On Let's Go" featuring the lip-syncing of Lou Diamond Phillips.


The album was rounded out by Howard Huntsberry as Jackie Wilson singing "Lonely Teardrops," "Crying Waiting Hoping" by Marshall Crenshaw as Buddy Holly, "Summertime Blues" performed by Brian Setzer of Stray Cats as Eddie Cochran and  Bo Diddley (Otha Ellis Bates McDaniels) as himself performing "Who Do You Love." All of the original artists depicted here are in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and in Rock & Roll Heaven. This soundtrack sold well over two million copies.



BLACK

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP


(Last Week No. 2)

 

BIGGER AND DEFFER


LL COOL J 

 

DEF JAM RECORDINGS 40793

 

Produced by:

 

 

L.A. POSSE and LL COOL J

 

 

 

Ladies Love Cool James—that they did in 1987, and still do. They liked him as a teenager performing Rap music while going to Andrew Jackson High School in Queens, NY. He dropped out after his success with his first release, “I Need A Beat” in 1984. This was just the start for James Todd Smith, as in 1987, he had the Black Album chart-leader this week with Bigger And Deffer or BAD for this, the ninth of 11 non-consecutive survey-periods. This was his second album; with the lead single called "I'm Bad." The second single made L.L. Cool J a star with the Rap ballad, "I Need Love."

While he had bigger Hip-Hop singles later in his career, Bigger And Deffer was his best-selling album set, with over three-million sold. His biggest Pop chart hits were "Hey Lover" featuring Boys II Men on backing vocals, and "Loungin'" featuring guest vocals from Total. In fact, many of his singles have featured big stars, including Jennifer Lopez, and others. LL Cool J went on to acting in several movies including: Krush Groove as a DJ, Wildcats, Toys (with Robin Williams) In Too Deep and Any Given Sunday, S.W.A.T. and Last Holiday. He is considered one of the hottest actors in Hollywood, playing Special Agent Sam Hanna on CBS Television since 2009 on the
procedural drama NCIS: Los Angeles. He has been the host of four Grammy® Awards shows. James was nominated but not inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame for the Class of 2014.

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert. 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

All content on this page is copyright Big Jay Sorensen and of its respective copyright owners.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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