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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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August 21st, 2015


THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

AUGUST 26, 1967



HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

 


THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.   


***************************************************************************

No. 10  (LW 9)  “A WHITER SHADE OF PALE”

(Keith Reid / Gary Brooker)

Produced by:

Denny Cordell

for New Breed Productions

                      

PROCOL HARUM DERAM 7507

***************************************************************************

No. 9  (LW 21)  “YOU'RE MY EVERYTHING”

(Norman Whitfield / Roger Penzabene / Cornelius Grant)                                   

 

Produced by:

Norman Whitfield



THE TEMPTATIONS GORDY 7063



***************************************************************************


No. 8  (LW 20)  “REFLECTIONS”  

 

(Brian Holland / Lamont Dozier - Eddie Holland)                                                           

Produced by:

Eddie Holland and Lamont Dozier


DIANA ROSS AND THE SUPREMES MOTOWN 1111

***************************************************************************

No. 7  (LW 8)  “COLD SWEAT - Part 1”  

(James Brown / Alfred Ellis)                                                           

Produced by:

A James Brown Production
 

 JAMES BROWN AND THE FAMOUS FLAMES KING 12403

***************************************************************************

No. 6  (LW 4)  “I WAS MADE TO LOVE HER”

(Henry Cosby / Lulu Hardaway / Sylvia Moy / Stevie Wonder)                             

Produced by:

Hank Cosby

 

STEVIE WONDER TAMLA 54151

***************************************************************************

No. 5  (LW 5)  “BABY I LOVE YOU” 

(Ronny Shannon)

Produced by:

Jerry Wexler

Engineered by:

Tom Dowd


ARETHA FRANKLIN
ATLANTIC 2427                                                                                                  

***************************************************************************

No. 4  (LW 2)  LIGHT MY FIRE

(Words And Music by The Doors --
John Densmore / Robbie Krieger / Ray Manzarek / Jim Morrison)
                                                   

Produced by:

Paul A. Rothchild
Engineered by:
Bruce Botnick


THE DOORS  ELEKTRA 45615


***************************************************************************

No. 3  (LW 3)  “PLEASANT VALLEY SUNDAY”

(Gerry Goffin / Carole King)

Produced by:

Douglas Farthing Hatlelid


 THE MONKEES COLGEMS 1007

***************************************************************************

No. 2  (LW 1)  ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE

(John Lennon / Paul McCartney)                                                 

Produced in England by:

George Martin

 

THE BEATLES CAPITOL 5964


***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 7)

 

ODE TO BILLY JOE


(Bobbie Gentry)


Flip-Side:

“MISSISSIPPI DELTA”


BOBBIE GENTRY

CAPITOL RECORDS  6359


Produced by:

Kelly Gordon & Bobby Paris

Did you realize, the original Tallahatchie Bridge buckled just a few years after being depicted in the made-up story "Ode To Billy Joe" by Country singer Bobbie Gentry? Well, the bridge (that ficticious character Billy Joe McAllister jumped off) in this week's No. 1 Hot 100 Singles chart hit, was genuine, and it crossed the Tallahatchie River in a small unincorporated town called Money, Mississippi. The bridge was replaced after it fell into the river in 1972. It was built nearby, but they renamed it the Sanders-Hooper Bridge. Gee, I wonder why? 
So just what WAS thrown off the bridge in the song by the girl and Billy Joe? What WHY did the character Billy Joe McAllister leap off the bridge after that episode? Bobbie Gentry (real name Roberta Lee Streeter) maintains she knows what was thrown off the bridge, but she remains tight-lipped. She continues to say even she doesn't know why the guy jumped. Gentry has maintained the song itself was about the relationship of a family that can't come to grips with death and specifically, suicide (in effect, ignoring it) and the pitiable relations between the song's narrator and her mother. A film version of the story in the song came out in 1976, taking many liberties in the interpretation of the narrative; written and directed by none-other than "Jethro" from TV's The Beverly Hillbillies, Max Baer, Jr. which was quite rewarding financially for Gentry. I've read reports that initially, there was an even longer version of the song. Capitol Records had it edited down to 4:14 in order to leave the listener wondering just what the heck truly went down on the third of June--a sleepy dusty delta day--near the Choctaw Ridge with the storyteller picked floweres to throw into the muddy water. And interestingly, the song was originally thought by the record company as a B side of the tune "Mississippi Delta," the ultimate flip-side of the 45 RPM.


Here's a side not about the length of the released version of "Ode To Billy Joe." In next week's Billboard Magazine, then WABC radio programmer Rick Sklar was telling record companies that he was banning records over three and a half minutes from his station if it was NOT in the current Top 20! The reason given was that it would cause too much clutter and more commercials would have to be bunched together. He was begging record companies to make edited or shorter versions of songs for air-play! "Ode To Billy Joe" certainly was played every hour around the clock when it reached No. 1 on WABC-AM in NYC next week; jumping from No. 4. The song had jumped from No. 10 to No. 1 this week on WMCA-AM in NYC. Gentry won three Grammy(r) Awards for '67, including: Best New Artist, Best Vocal Performance, Female and Best Contemporary Female Solo Performance. Celebrated arranger Jimmy Haskell won a Grammy(r) for Arranger of the Year, for his simple two violins and four cellos orchestration added to Bobbie Gentry's unaccompanied acoustic guitar track. Incongruously, the song resonated more with the wide Pop audience, and only attained the No. 17 peak position on the Hot Country Singles register. This week was the second of an eventual four survey-phases as the nation's biggest 45 RPM release. 

Big Jay's Record Pig Music Trivia© No. 1: The Native-America Choctaw tribe's meaning of the word "Tallahatchie" means "Rock of Waters." 
Big Jay's Record Pig Music Trivia© No. 2: Gentry's single replaced the Beatles one-week No. 1 45 RPM "All You Need Is Love" on the Hot 100, and then, her album (also named Ode To Billy Joe) replaced the Fab Four's LP Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band at the end of its 15 survey-period run at the crest of the Top LPs chart in October of '67. 



TOP 40

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 9)


"IN THE CHAPEL IN THE MOONLIGHT


(Billy Hill)

 

Flip-Side:

“WELCOME TO MY WORLD”


DEAN MARTIN

REPRISE RECORDS 0610

 

Produced by:

Jimmy Bowen

Arranged by:

Ernie Freeman

The roots of this week’s biggest hit on the Easy Listening Singles chart go way back to 1936, when Country/Western Tin Pan Alley songwriter Billy Hill penned “In The Chapel In The Moonlight” and was a No. 1 hit on Bluebird Records that year for Big-Band leader, Brooklyn-native Shep Fields and his Rippling Rhythm Orchestra. Check THIS out. 

Flash-forward to 1967 and the re-invigorated career of ‘Rat-Pack’ member Dean Martin was in full-swing. He had re-recorded a version of “Everybody Loves Somebody” in ’64 that took the record industry by surprise in the middle of the British Invasion, the reign of American groups like the 4 Seasons, the Beach Boys and the enslaught of music from Motown and Memphis. Dean Martin’s latest single on his buddy Frank Sinatra’s Reprise Records was the chief hit on the Easy Listening Singles chart this week in ’67; the first of three consecutive weeks on that listing.

Gaining mass TV exposure on his own show, Dean Martin’s “In The Chapel In The Moonlight” reached a respectable No. 25 on the Hot 100 Singles chart as well. His "Rat-Pack" pally Frank Sinatra would have the biggest Easy Listening single next week with his fourth No. 1 song in a row on that chart; "The World We Knew (Over And Over)" also on Reprise Records. Comedian, recording star, TV, film and concert headliner, Dino Paul Crocetti died of emphysema on Christmas Day in 1995.

 

TOP SELLING R&B

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 3)

 

BABY I LOVE YOU”


(Ronny Shannon)

 

Flip-Side:

“GOIN' DOWN SLOW”


 

ARETHA FRANKLIN

ATLANTIC RECORDS 2427


Produced by:

Jerry Wexler


Engineered, Arranged and Directed by:

Tom Down & Arif Mardin


This week's No. 1 45 RPM on the Top Selling R&B Singles listing had the red-hot new Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin at the helm. She was so hot, her first album on Atlantic Records was also No. 1 during this survey-cycle, and had been on top for 14 non-consecutive weeks; with this being the last. (**See below.) Franklin's current single was "Baby I Love You" written by the guy who gave Aretha her first mainstream hit with Atlantic, "I Never Loved A Man The Way That I Love You" Ronny Shannon.

 

This track was taken from Franklin's brand new album called Aretha Arrives, which would also become the biggest R&B LP in the nation in just a few weeks; for a total of five survey-segments. That album was released just weeks ago on August 4, 1967 and was rapidly climbing the Pop and R&B album charts. "Baby I Love You" was the immediate follow-up to Franklin's landmark recording, "Respect." "Baby I Love You" had a slower-tempo than "Respect," but carried a wallop in the "soul" department. It was the biggest hit this week on the Top Selling R&B Singles chart, and currently sitting in its ultimate peak position at No. 4 on the Pop Hot 100. "Baby I Love You" was Aretha's second consecutive million-selling single--she would eventually have 14 as a solo artist as of this writing.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

AUGUST 26, 1967

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


 

SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND

THE BEATLES


CAPITOL RECORDS 2653


Produced by:

George Martin


This survey-period in ’67 was the ninth of an ultimate 15 weeks at the pinnacle of the Top LPs chart for the Beatles with their glorious Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band on Capitol Records. The album was begun on November 24, 1966 at the EMI Studios on Abbey Road, after the Fab Four hadn’t collectively been together much for over two months; as they ended touring forever as a group just months before. Little did anyone know that what was about to happen would have perhaps the most profound effect on what was regarded as Pop music. The first song recorded specifically for this project was “Strawberry Fields Forever,” but that song was deemed so good, it wasn’t included on the forthcoming LP, and was itself a masterwork. Instead, it was teamed with “Penny Lane” (another equally special recording) as a single for worldwide release in February of ’67, while the Beatles worked on even more cuts for what would be a ground-shaking piece of work, ending the album with “A Day In The Life” seen and heard below in the remastered version.

Actually, the British version of the LP didn’t end with “A Day In The Life.” With the help of producer George Martin and engineer/producer Geoff Emerick, they decided to add two rather odd things after the last sounds of the giant crescendo of the song ran its course. First, John Lennon wanted something that most humans couldn’t hear—a 15 kilocycle tone—that only dogs could perceive. Then, in a last stroke of lunacy, the boys recorded absurd noises and gibberish, which was then edited and turned backward; placed in what’s called the concentric run-out groove—the spot where automatic turntables lift the tone-arm to allow another LP to fall to the surface. On record players that were manually operated, this silliness could, theoretically go on forever. Subsequent digital copies of the album include these sounds, but fades out after repeating the insanity for several seconds. Re-listen to Sgt. Pepper as fast as you can. It’s your duty.

 

TOP SELLING R&B 

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 6)

 

I NEVER LOVED A MAN THE WAY THAT I LOVE YOU

 

ARETHA FRANKLIN

 

ATLANTIC RECORDS 8139


Produced by:

Jerry Wexler

Engineered and Arranged by:

Tom Dowd & Arif Mardin

 

Aretha Franklin signed with Atlantic in late 1966 after a lengthy, but largely unproductive stay at mainstream Columbia Records. This week’s leader the R&B album list became the springboard that launched Franklin into a superstar orbit. The first single reached No. 9 on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart. “I Never Loved A Man (The Way That I Love You)” was written Ronnie Shannon, who also would write another hit (also a No. 1 R&B smash and Top 4 Pop record) by Aretha called “Baby I Love You.” Aretha’s signature song “Respect” was also on that LP (leading off the set) and was her first of many No. 1 Pop singles. But that song had to be recorded in New York, as Aretha’s then husband Ted White pulled a hissy-fit while his bride was recording what would be the B side of “I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)” at the Muscle Shoals, Alabama FAME Studios; “Do Right Woman, Do Right Man.”

Legend has it that a session musician was looking a tad too lasciviously at the future Queen of Soul, and Ted White had a knock-down fight with the studio cat. Those fisticuffs cut short the recording session, with Franklin and spouse making tracks for her home in Detroit. Franklin was nowhere to be found according to Jerry Wexler, her producer. They needed Franklin to complete the vocal track on the A side to be able to release the recording on vinyl; which Atlantic thought to be the stronger of the two cuts in the can. This altercation forced the recording of the rest of the LP to move from Alabama to the Atlantic studios here in Gotham. That transport was made with reservations by Wexler, who was expressly looking for the gritty sound and ambience of the Muscle Shoals studio. But Wexler (who wielded a lot of power at the time) shifted most of the same musicians to New York to complete the album I Never Loved A Man, after White and Franklin calmed down about the confrontation and arrived in Manhattan. White later claimed the original conflict was racial in nature; however that was labeled inaccurate by Wexler and others in the studio down in Muscle Shoals. The LP I Never Loved A Man has been heralded as a landmark set of songs.



 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

AUGUST 26, 1978



HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

 

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10  (LW 3)  “LAST DANCE”

(Paul Jabara)

Produced by:

Giorgio Moroder & Pete Bellotte                                                                                              


DONNA SUMMER CASABLANCA 926


***************************************************************************

No. 9  (LW 10)  “AN EVERLASTING LOVE”

(Barry Gibb)

Executive Producer

Barry Gibb

Produced by:

Barry Gibb, Albhy Galuten & Karl Richardson

by Arrangment with the Robert Stigwood Organisation

 

ANDY GIBB RSO 904

***************************************************************************

No. 8  (LW 9)  “MAGNET AND STEEL”  

(Walter Egan)

Produced by:

Walter Egan, Lindsey Buckingham and Richard Dashut

for Swell Sounds, Inc. and Contemporary Communications, Inc.
 

WALTER EGAN COLUMBIA 10719

***************************************************************************

No. 7  (LW 11)  “HOPELESSLY DEVOTED TO YOU”

(John Farrar)

Produced by:

John Farrar for Buffalo Music, Inc.


OLIVIA NEWTON- JOHN RSO 903 

***************************************************************************

No. 6  (LW 7)  “LOVE WILL FIND A WAY”

(Corey Lerios / David Jenkins)                                                         

Produced by:

Bill Schnee


PABLO CRUISE  A&M  2048

***************************************************************************

No. 5  (LW 5)  “HOT BLOODED”

(Lou Graham / Mick Jones)

Produced by:

Keith Olson, Mick Jones and Ian McDonald


FOREIGNER ATLANTIC 3488

 

***************************************************************************

No. 4  (LW 6) “BOOGIE OOGIE OOGIE

(Janis Jonson / Perry Kibble)

Produced by:

Fonze Mizzell & Larry Mizzell

for Sky-High Productions

                                                                   

A TASTE OF HONEY CAPITOL 4565

***************************************************************************

No. 3  (LW 4)  “MISS YOU”

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richards)

 

Produced and Arranged by:

The Glimmer Twins

Re-Mix by:

Bob Clearmountain

 

THE ROLLING STONES ROLLING STONES 19304


 
***************************************************************************

No. 2  (LW 1)  “THREE TIMES A LADY”

(Lionel Richie)

Produced and Arranged by:

James Carmichael & Commodores


COMMODORES MOTOWN 1443

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“GREASE”

 

         (Barry Gibb)             


Flip-Side:

“GREASE - INSTUMENTAL”

 

FRANKIE VALLI

 

RSO RECORDS  897



Produced by:

Barry Gibb, Albhy Galuten & Karl Richardson

By Arrangement with The Robert Stigwood Organisation


The first single from the two-album set was the title track “Grease” from Frankie Valli. It took 14 weeks, but the record was in the No. 1 slot for this sole week during this survey-period in 1978. I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Valli via telephone only minutes after recording his lead vocal under the direction of Barry Gibb Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson at the Criterion Studios in Miami. He told me he had just done the vocal for a new motion picture called Grease, and was very excited to be working with Gibb. I asked if he would be IN the film, and he just chuckled. He told me he may do some acting in the future; as he would on TV's The Sopranos and other one-off projects. RSO Records released the track as the first offering, despite the fact that the film’s director Randal Klieser didn’t think it fit the ‘50s-era film. Valli had nothing to do with the flick except for the song! Here’s an abbreviated clip of Valli lip-syncing the song on a TV show.

Frankie Valli's single sold over two million; by far his biggest selling SOLO 45 RPM--surpasing any record he made as the lead voice of the 4 Seasons. (**See below for more on the Grease Soundtrack LPs.)



TOP 50 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

No.1

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)



“THREE TIMES A LADY”

 

(Lionel Richie)

                                                                                      

Flip-Side:

“LOOK WHAT YOU'VE DONE TO ME”


COMMODORES


MOTOWN RECORDS  1443

 

Produced and Arranged by:

James Carmichael & Commodores

 


It was beginning to look like Commodores found their stride by the time "Three Times A Lady" hit the pinnacle position on three Billboard charts. This week, the group that formed at Tuskeegee Institute (now a University) were the owners of the prime 45 RPM record on the Top 50 Easy Listening Singles special survey with the ballad. The album version was a full three-minutes longer than the official single on Motown Records. So, of course, I offer you that longer version.

Lionel Richie went on to super-stardom as a solo artist beginning four years after “Three Times A Lady” indicated just how strong a songwriter and solo performer he was. The song was inspired by Richie’s father talking about Lionel’s mother. This record was an across-the-board crossover for the Commodores, reaching No. 1 on the Hot 100 next week (for two weeks) in ’78,  and the crest of the Hot Soul Singles chart for the same two weeks as well. Commodores had one more No. 1 Pop and Hot Soul Singles chart hit, yet another ballad featuring Richie on lead vocal called "Still" in '79. But Commodores had success after Richie left the act, with their biggest hit sans Lionel called "Nightshift"--a tribute to both Jackie Wilson and Marvin Gaye in 1985. That song was No. 1 for four weeks on the Black Singles chart and reached No. 3 on the Hot 100. (**See more about Commodores LP Natural High below.)




 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 4)

 

“GET OFF”

 

(Carlos Driggs / Ish Ledesma)

 

Flip-Side:

“YOU MAKE ME HOT”

 

FOXY

DASH RECORDS  5046


Produced by:

Cory Wade

Arranged by:

Cory Wade & Foxy


When you have a single with titles like "Get Off" and "You Make Me Hot," it's obvious that these tracks were screaming dancing--right. They screamed sex. Ok, and dancing too...maybe at the same time if you're very, very agile. Foxy was a Latino dance group from Miami, Florida who latched onto the success of T.K. Records; home of K. C. & the Sunshine Band, George McCrea ("Rock Your Baby") and a host of other acts. Dash Records was another subsidiary of T.K.'s empire in South Florida. "Get Off" was the biggest hit on the Hot Soul Singles listing this week in '78. Check out this lip-synced performance by Foxy, introduced by a complimentary (I think) Joey Bishop on his late night TV show in '78.



The backing singers on "Get Off" were called Wildflower. The song was No. 35 during this survey-period on the Hot 100 and climbing to an eventual No. 9 peak position. Foxy's album was also called Get Off on Dash, and it reached a respectable No. 3 on the Hot Soul LPs chart (No. 8 this week) and No. 12 on the Pop Top LPs register. Members of Foxy included: Ish "Angel" Ledesma on lead vocals and guitar, Charlie Murciano on keyboards, Arnold Paseiro on bass, Joe Galdo on drums with the son of Tito Puentes, Richard "Richie" Puentes on (what else) percussion. The younger Puentes died at age 51 in 2004. His dad passed away in 2000. Foxy had one more hit in them, with a song called "Hot Number" and its peak number was 21 on the Hot 100 and No. 4 on the Soul Singles list in the Spring of '79.


THE

BIG
ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

AUGUST 20, 1977

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

GREASE

The Original Soundtrack to the Motion Picture


VARIOUS ARTISTS


RSO RECORDS  2-4002


Produced by:

Albhy Galuten, Barry Gibb & Karl Richardson (Tracks A1 & D7)

John Farrar (Tracks A3, A4, A5, D5 & D4)

Louis St. Louis (Tracks A2, B1, B2, B3, B4, B6, C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, D1, D2, D3, D5 & D6

Compiled by: Bill Oakes

RSO records seemingly could do no wrong by 1978. With the release of the movie soundtrack to Grease, the record company had a mega-hit album plus various singles to mine from it. This was the second of an ultimate 12 non-consecutive survey-periods in the pinnacle position on the Top LPs & Tape chart. The first single from the two-album set was the title track “Grease” from Frankie Valli. I had the honor of interviewing Valli immediately following the recording of his vocals under the direction of Barry Gibb at the Criterion Studio in Miami. He told me he had just done the vocals for a new movie and was very excited to work with Gibb. RSO Records released the track as the first offering, despite the fact that the film’s director Randal Klieser didn’t think it fit the ‘50s-era film. Valli had nothing to do with the flick except for the song! Here’s an abbreviated clip of Valli lip-syncing the song on a TV show.

He also didn’t think the song “You’re The One That I Want” featuring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John was right for the movie for the same reason. Both “Grease” and their mega-hit became No. 1 songs despite not sounding or lyrically compatible with ‘50s music. “You’re The One That I Want” is one of the biggest singles ever in the U.K. The soundtrack album featured these subsequent singles in America: “Summer Nights” (No. 5 Pop) also featuring Travolta and Newton-John and Cast (which was a bigger hit in the U.K. than in the U.S.—selling over a million and a half copies in Britain) “Hopelessly Devoted To You” (No. 3 Pop/No. 7 Easy Listening/No. 20 Hot Country Tracks chart) from Olivia solo, and “Greased Lightning” by Travolta solo which only managed to reach No. 47 on the Hot 100. Perhaps by that point Greasemania had reached its peak. The rest of the album featured several cuts from Sha Na Na and other artists.




SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

 

NATURAL HIGH

COMMODORES

MOTOWN RECORDS  790

Produced and Arranged by:

James Carmichael & Commodores


Commodores were heading into uncharted territory as Motown's latest mass-appeal act with their first No. 1 hit on the Hot 100 Singles chart for two survey-phases beginning three weeks ago. "Three Times A Lady" also had been the biggest hit on the Soul Singles chart during that same time period. Add to that, it was this week's Top 50 Easy Listening Singles chart No. 1 record for the second of three back-to-back survey-cycle. But what about the Commodores corresponding album Big Jay? Ok, you got it out of me. Natural High was riding the coattails of "Three Times A Lady," and was this week's biggest album on the Soul LPs chart for the last of eight non-consecutive survey-phases on Motown Records. It started its commanding position on the Soul LPs chart for the first time for the week ending on June 24, 1978. The follow-up single to "Three Times A Lady" was a much more upbeat track called "Flying High," only it didn't get beyond No. 38 on the Hot 100. Here are Commodores in a live setting singing that song.


Commodores' album Natural High would peak at No. 3 on the Pop Top LPs chart. Commodores consisted of Lionel Richie, William King on trumpet, Tom McLary on guitar, Milan Williams on keyboards, Ronald LaPread on bass, and Walter "Clyde" Orange on co-lead vocals and drums. Lionel Richie left Commodores in 1982 for one of the biggest solo careers by a male singer in the '80s. 


 


 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

AUGUST 25, 1984

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.   


***************************************************************************

No. 10  (LW 15)  “IF EVER YOU'RE IN MY ARMS AGAIN”

(Michael Masser / Tom Snow / Cynthia Weil)

Produced by:

Michael Masser for Prince Street Productions

Strings Arranged and Conducted by:

Lee Holdridge


PEABO BRYSON ELEKTRA 69728


***************************************************************************

No. 9
  (LW 15)  “SHE BOP”

(Cyndi Lauper / Stephen Lunt / Gary Corbett / Rick Chertoff)

Produced by:

Rick Chertoff

Executive Producer:

Lenny Petze for Red Sox Music Production


CYNDI LAUPER PORTRAIT 05011


***************************************************************************

No. 8  (LW 9)  “SUNGLASSES AT NIGHT”    

(Corey Hart)

Produced by:

Jon Astley and Phil Chapman


COREY HART EMI AMERICA 8203 

***************************************************************************

No. 7  (LW 3)  “STATE OF SHOCK”                           

(Music written, composed and arranged by Michael Jackson)

(Lyrics by: Michael Jackson / and Randy Hansen

 

Produced by:

Michael Jackson

Lead Vocals by:

Michael Jackson & Mick Jagger


JACKSONS EPIC 04503

 

***************************************************************************

No. 6  (LW 6)  “I CAN DREAM ABOUT YOU”

(Dan Hartman)

Produced by:

Dan Hartman & Jimmy Iovine

(Music from the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack "Streets Of Fire" Performed by)

DAN HARTMAN MCA 04503

***************************************************************************

No. 5  (LW 7)  “MISSING YOU” 

(John Waite / Charles Stanford / Mark Leonard)

Produced by:

John Wait, David Thoener and Gary Gersh

Mixed & Edited by:

John Luongo


JOHN WAITE EMI AMERICA 8212

 

***************************************************************************

No. 4  (LW 4)  “WHEN DOVES CRY” 

(Prince)

Produced & Arranged by:

Prince

 

PRINCE WARNER BROS. 29286

 

***************************************************************************

No. 3  (LW 5)  “STUCK ON YOU”

(Lionel Richie)

Produced and Arranged by:

Lionel Richie and James Anthony Carmichael

 

LIONEL RICHIE MOTOWN 1746

 

***************************************************************************

No. 2  (LW 2)  “WHAT'S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT”  

(Terry Britten / Graham Lyle)

Produced by:

Terry Britten


TINA TURNERCAPITOL 5354

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No.1 )

 

“GHOSTBUSTERS”

 

(Ray Parker, Jr.)

 

Flip-Side

“GHOSTBUSTERS - (INSTRUMENTAL)”

 

 

RAY PARKER, Jr.


ARISTA RECORDS  9212


Produced, Engineer & Mixed by:

Ray Parker, Jr.

 

Who ya gonna call…John Belushi, Eddie Murphy and John Candy? The initial drafts of what became the film Ghostbusters (the working title was Ghostsmashers) had them as stars with Dan Aykroyd, who had written a screenplay with Harold Ramis. Belushi died, and both Murphy and Candy had other commitments; plus, the producers wanted a leaner budgeted scaled-down re-write. So, Aykroyd and Ramis went back to the drawing board and ended up with a New York setting that still featured Aykroyd and Ramis…but added Bill Murray, Sigourney Weaver and Ernie Hudson (with Rick Moranis and Annie Potts) to the cast. But they needed a theme-song, really fast. Who ya gonna call…Lindsay Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac? If he is to be believed…yes. He says producers of the film approached him to write the theme for the movie. He passed, claiming he didn’t want to be known for writing film themes. However, Buckingham already wrote a song called “Holiday Road” (No. 82 Pop, featured in the first Vacation flick, and, that song has even been used in TV commercials recently) so what gives Lindsey? Just count your royalties and be done with it. After the studio couldn’t find the right song from over 60 submitted, they turned to Ray Parker, Jr. He found that rhyming something with the word ghostbusters was easier said than done, so he simply had a group of people shout the word. Problem solved. The video had cameos from everybody who was anybody at the time.

This was the last of three uninterrupted weeks as the primo Pop single in America this week in ’84, and the first of an concluding two survey-sequences on the Black Singles chart. But wait—there’s more. Huey Lewis (featured with his group the News who appeared at last year’s “Saturday in the Park” concert on Long Island, sponsored by CBS-FM) sued Columbia Pictures and Parker for copyright-infringement of “I Want A New Drug” from ’83. Supposedly, the suit was settled out of court in 1995, but smoldered again after Huey mentioned it during 2001 interview—voiding a confidentiality agreement with Parker! It’s not known how that situation was rectified with the legal departments. So Huey, now who ya gonna call— “Sharkbusters?”


 

TOP 50

ADULT 
CONTEMPORARY

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84

 

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY (Middle Road)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)


“STUCK ON YOU”

 

(Lionel Richie)

 

Flip-Side

“ROUND AND ROUND”


 

 LIONEL RICHIE


MOTOWN 1746

 

Produced and Arranged by:


Lionel Richie and James Anthony Carmichael




"Stuck On You" was the fourth consecutive Hot 100 Singles chart Top 10 (Hot 100) single from the LP Can't Slow Down from Lionel Richie. A fifth was eventually released called "Penny Lover" (No. 8 Pop and No. 1 Adult Contemporary) putting Richie in superstar territory once again. When the 45 RPM version of "Stuck On You" hit the record stores (remember those) a picture sleeve enclosed the vinyl featuring a picture of Lionel in Country-syled garb; almost looking like a cowboy! And indeed, this was Richie's first foray into purposefully recording a Country-styled song. He had written one of the biggest Country songs of the decade when he wrote "Lady" for Kenny Rogers; a No. 1 Pop, Adult Contemporary and Country 45 RPM. "Stuck On You" was in the fourth of an ultimate five back-to-back survey-cycles as the biggest hit on the Top 50 Adult Contemporary singles listing this week in '84.

"Stuck On You" also made the Black Singles chart, with a peak position of No. 8 there. The 45 RPM reached No. 3 for two weeks on the Hot 100, and even garnered a peak position of No. 24 on the Hot Country Singles chart. Motown was being distributed by MCA Records by 1984 after they absorbed the distribution of Hitsville, U.S.A. product by this time. They still used the iconic Motown logo for the "Stuck On You" 45 RPM label, and used an insignia with the familiar M for Motown and the phrase "25 Years."

 


BLACK SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“GHOSTBUSTERS”

 

(Ray Parker, Jr.)

Flip-Side

“GHOSTBUSTERS - (INSTRUMENTAL)”



RAY PARKER, Jr.


ARISTA RECORDS – 9212

  

Produced, Engineered and Mixed by:

Ray Parker, Jr.

 

The single "Ghostbusters" was also No. 1 on the Black Singles chart for the first of two weeks during this survey-phase in '84. (**See above.)

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week ENDING

AUGUST 25, 1984

 

TOP POP

ALBUMS 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:


No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


PURPLE RAIN

PRINCE

And The Revolution

WARNER BROS. RECORDS  25110



Produced, Arranged, & Composed by:

Prince

 

This was week number four of an ultimate 24 consecutive survey-cycles as the biggest album in the U.S. for Purple Rain. “When Doves Cry” was the first single from the film soundtrack of Purple Rain from Prince And The Revolution. The single sold over two-million copies and was the biggest-selling song of 1984. It first became No. 1 on the Hot 100 for the week ending on July 7, 1984, and topped that listing for an ultimate five survey-phases; overtaken by "Ghostbusters" during the second week in August. According to the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) this single was the last to gain Platinum status for over two-million transactions before the sales criteria changed and was lowered five years later. “When Doves Cry” was named the No. 1 single of the year by Billboard for both the Hot 100 and Hot Black Singles charts. Prince has been listed at the second biggest artist of the ‘80s, right behind Michael Jackson.  The current single taken from the soundtrack was "Let's Go Crazy," and it was rapidly climbing the  Hot 100,  first entering that register as No. 45; and within eight weeks, it  was on top of the that chart by the end of September. Oh...and good luck finding any videos of His Purpleness. Prince Rogers Nelson has had virtually all performances removed from the time-space continueum. The album just wouldn't quit as two other singles, the title track, "Purple Rain" (No. 2 Pop) and "I Would Die 4 U" (No. 8 Pop) would soon be unleashed on the purple people public. Another song from the soundtrack listed as by Appolonia called "Take Me With U" was the final single (No. 25 Pop) from the set. The LP has sold over 13 million physical units in the U.S. and over 22 million globally; making it one of the most successful records in the rock era. 


 

 

BLACK

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


PURPLE RAIN

PRINCE

And The Revolution


WARNER BROS. RECORDS  25110


Produced, Arranged, & Composed by:

Prince




He hated his last name—Nelson; so Prince Rogers Nelson just dropped his middle and last name for his moniker, only to change it to just a symbol for a several years. Prince And The Revolution, the band he had been using for recording since the '70s, once again had he No. 1 LP in America, Purple Rain. This was the fifth of a final 19 weeks as the principal  album  on the Black LPs chart.


**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert. 

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

All content on this page is copyright Big Jay Sorensen and of its respective copyright owners.

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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