Tuesday, February 21, 2017 Page Options

BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

   Minimize





August 14th, 2015


A Big Note From Big Jay!

Your comments about the feature Big Jay’s Big Week in Pop Music History, as well as the entire website www.BigJaySorensen.com are always welcome.

Send them to BigJay@BigJaySorensen.com and I promise I’ll respond.

While you’re at it, please register your email address on the home page of my website. And if you see my posts on Facebook on the Big Jay Sorensen (fan page) please SHARE it with all of your music-loving friends and family please!

BE BIG!

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

AUGUST 20, 1966



HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 20) “SUNSHINE SUPERMAN”

(Donovan Leitch)

Produced by:

Mickey Most
                      

DONOVAN EPIC10045

***************************************************************************

No. 9 (LW 11) “I COULDN’T LIVE WITHOUT YOUR LOVE”

(Tony Hatch / Jackie Trent)                                   

 

Produced by:

Tony Hatch

Arranged by:

Tony Hatch

 

 

PETULA CLARK WARNER BROS.5835

 

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 8) “MOTHER’S LITTLE HELPER”  

 

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richards)                                                           

Produced by:

Andrew Loog Oldham

 

THE ROLLING STONES LONDON 902

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 5) “PIED PIPER”  

(Artie Kornfeld / Steve Duboff)                                                           

Produced by:

David Nicolson – A Declon Recording                                                                            

 

CRISPIAN ST. PETERS JAMIE1320

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 14) “SEE YOU IN SEPTEMBER’”

(Sid Wayne / Sherman Edwards)                             

Produced by:

Bright Tunes Productions (The Tokens)

Arranged and Conducted by:
Herb Bernstein


 

THE HAPPENINGS B.T. PUPPY520

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 3) “THEY’RE COMING TO TAKE ME AWAY, HA-HAAA!” 

(Napoleon Bonaparte) a/k/a Jerry Samuels                                                 

Produced by:

Jerry Samuels – A Jepalana Production

 

NAPOLEON XIV WARNER BROS. 5831                                                                                                          

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “WILD THING” 

(Chip Taylor) a/k/a James Wesley Voight                                                       

Produced by:

Larry Page – A Page One Production




THE TROGGS ATCO6415 / FONTANA1548

***************************************************************************
No. 3 (LW 2) “LIL’ RED RIDING HOOD”


(Ronald Blackwell)

Produced by:

Stan Kesler                                                                                                                            

SAM THE SHAM AND THE PHAROHS MGM13506

***************************************************************************
No. 2 (LW 7) “SUNNY” 


(Bobby Hebb)                                                  

Produced by:

Jerry Ross

Arranged by: Joe Renzetti

 

BOBBY HEBB PHILIPS40365

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“SUMMER IN THE CITY”


(John Sebastian / Mark Sebastian / Steve Boone)


Flip-Side:

“BUTCHIE’S TUNE”


THE

LOVIN’ SPOONFUL

ATCO RECORDS6359

Produced by:

Erik Jacobson –

A Production of Koppelman & Rubin Associates



The sound of jackhammers, and sweltering city streets was the image that came scorching out of little transistor radio speakers across America this week in ’66 with “Summer In The City” from the Lovin’ Spoonful in the catbird seat atop the Pop singles chart. The song has stood the test of time, especially for people who grew up on the streets of New York City, and survived sizzling summer days. The creative use of sound effects, tempo changes, exquisite musicianship and vocals by John Sebastian along with Zal Yanovsky, Steve Boone and Joe Butler made “Summer In The City” one of pop music’s quintessential pieces. Producer Erik Jacobsen had been a member of a bluegrass group, yet after hearing the Beatles, wanted to somehow meld the sound of folk and rock music. He found the folk ingredients needed in John Sebastian and Zal Yanovsky (also influenced by the Ed Sullivan Show appearance by the Fab Four.) Sebastian and Yanovsky had been in a jug-band called the Mugwumps that also included Mama Cass Elliot and Denny Doherty—both future members of The Mamas & The Papas. Adding the rock elements with to the mix with Boone and Butler gave the Lovin’ Spoonful the magic ingredients for acceptance on the Pop singles charts and the burgeoning underground rock scene, initially in the Greenwich Village area of Manhattan. Jacobsen got them signed to Elektra Records, but the new Kama Sutra Records label exercised an option to pick them up and they struck pay-dirt with their first release, “Do You Believe In Magic.” They had three other singles after that first blast on the Pop singles chart, including; “You Didn’t Have To Be So Nice”, “Daydream”, “Did You Ever Have To Make Up Your Mind.” But their next 45 made them legends; and likely the strength of “Summer In The City” got them into the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. The song was written as a poem by John Sebastian, his brother Mark (who wrote the chorus idea) and bass player Steve Boone; included on the later LP Hums Of The Lovin’ Spoonful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5bUmx-hk-c

This was the second of an eventual three survey-phases in the No. 1 spot on the Hot 100 Singles list. The band became embroiled in a drug bust, with Yanovsky allegedly snitching on the seller which led to his being booted from the band. There was a brief period where the Producers of the TV series The Monkees were going to build that show starring the Lovin’ Spoonful. There was an issue with music licensing, so they passed on that project. The Lovin’ Spoonful replaced Yanovsky with Jim Yester, another former folkie for a short time before Sebastian (the face of the group) departed his own career. The ‘Spoonful’ ended their relationship with Jacobsen and continued to record with little success and broke up by early ’69. Sebastian sang at the Woodstock Music & Arts Fair (this week in ’69) in Bethel, NY and went on to produce commercials and had a number one Pop hit in ’67 with the theme from the TV show Welcome Back, Kotter. Butler joined the original Broadway cast of Hair for a while in ’68. Yanovsky died in Canada after a heart attack in 2002. Boone, Butler and Yester still perform with other musicians as the Lovin’ Spoonful.

 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“SOMEWHERE MY LOVE”

(Lara’s Theme From “Dr. Zhivago”

An M-G-M Picture

(Paul Francis Webster /

Maurice Jarre)

 

Flip-Side:

“MIDSUMMER IN SWEDEN”


RAY CONNIFF And The Singers

COLUMBIA RECORDS43626

 

Supervised and Produced by:

Ernie Altschuler

Assistant Vocal Conductor:

Jay Meyer

Assistant Orchestra Conductor:

Ted Romersa

Engineered by:
Jack Lattig

Former Artie Shaw big-band arranger, Joseph Raymond (Ray) Conniff became an orchestra and chorus leader and signed by Mitch Miller to work for Columbia Records. This week’s top Easy Listening Singles chart-leader was “Somewhere, My Love” which was (initially incidental music) “Lara’s Theme from Dr. Zhivago,” the M-G-M film starring Omar Sharif, Julie Christie, Rod Steiger, Alec Guinness and Geraldine Chaplin—Charlie’s daughter. Ray Conniff’s version of the often-recorded “Somewhere, My Love” was the biggest hit rendition; even reaching No. 9 on the Hot 100 Singles chart in ’66.

This was the fourth and concluding consecutive survey-cycle in the peak position for this 45 RPM release on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles special survey. Ray Conniff had many albums during his time with Columbia Records. In fact, I played many of these “Middle-of-the-Road” tracks during my first job on the radio in 1970. His recordings were usually remakes of recent hits or themed albums, laced with very lush orchestration and the addition of large choruses. Conniff was also a prolific songwriter. But for “Somewhere, My Love,” the writers were music composer Maurice Jarre, (originally just called “Lara’s Theme”) with lyrics added later specifically for Connie Francis by Paul Francis Webster. The Jersey Girl thought the lyrics were too, “Corny,” and passed on recording it originally. She did end up doing it, but because of that hesitation, it was Conniff who had the hit with “Somewhere, My Love” listed as Ray Conniff And The Singers; later shortened to Ray Conniff Singers. Conniff died after a fall in his bathtub in 2002 as he neared his 86th birthday.

 

TOP SELLING R&B

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“AIN’T TOO PROUD TO BEG”

(Eddie Holland / Norman Whitfield)

 

Flip-Side:

“YOU’LL LOSE A PRECIOUS LOVE”

 

THE TEMPTATIONS

GORDY RECORDS7054


Produced by:

Norman Whitfield


Fronted by lead vocalist David Ruffin, this week in ’66, “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” from the Temptations was in the last of a definitive eight non-consecutive seven-day assessment-periods at the pinnacle of the Top Selling R&B Singles special survey. The song was produced by Norman Whitfield and co-written by him and legendary lyric-writer Eddie Holland, Jr. Here is the ONLY mix of the song that truly matters—the original monaural 45 RPM release on Gordy Records.

The accomplishment of “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” with Whitfield as the producer, cost Smokey Robinson his job as the vocal group’s main muse after “Get Ready” failed to attain a high chart location on the Hot 100—deemed a failure by Berry Gordy, Jr. So, Whitfield would slowly evolve the Temptations away from a lavish R&B sound into a blending of semi-psychedelic rock and more sophisticated soul grooves. In fact, the Temptations didn’t realize the instantaneous success of the song, and were ordered to present “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” on American Bandstand as a last-minute substitution; improvising dance steps minutes before the national broadcast. The 45 RPM reached No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was released from the album Gettin’ Ready, featuring “Get Ready.” That single only garnered the maximum position of No. 29 on the Hot 100—though it did manage to reach the peak of the R&B singles register earlier in ’66.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

AUGUST 20, 1966

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

YESTERDAY AND TODAY

THE BEATLES

CAPITOL RECORDS2553


Produced by:

George Martin

What a hot mess 1966 was for the Beatles, despite their continued sales acumen. They had issues during their tour of Japan due to some people there thinking they desecrated the venue with amplified music (Budokan Hall) and their quick tour of the Philippines didn’t fare any better, as they were accused of dissing Imelda Marcos, wife of the country’s leader, after they were reportedly invited to the ruling palace, but didn’t show up because they were never officially notified. At first, they were not allowed to leave the country due to that situation, in addition to a tax issue with the promoter of their shows there. The Fabs barely escaped the airport in Manila with their lives. Finally safely back in Merry-Old England, the Beatles wanted something a bit avant-garde for the cover of an album they really didn’t want released in the first place in America. And if they wanted to create another instantaneous hullabaloo, this was the way to do it. The photograph on the front cover of the album called Yesterday And Today featured a picture snapped by Robert Whitaker. The Mop-Tops had been photographed so many times, that by 1966 they weren’t interested in the typical poses. So Whitaker’s idea of using pieces of meat and decapitated dolls strewn about the image captivated the group. They only knew these photos would be used for promotional purposes. As we’ve discussed previously, Capitol Records was up to its usual shenanigans with getting the most out of Beatles material. For this “new” LP in the U.S. and Canada, they took a few songs off of their most recent British LPs. From the album Help!, they grabbed the song “Yesterday” along with “Act Naturally,” already the A and B side of an American single and by now nearly a year old. Then, the U.S. record company added another American single, “Nowhere Man,” and “What Goes On” from their British album Rubber Soul to the LP. Not done yet with the mischief, Capitol also included the singles cuts “We Can Work It Out,” and “Day Tripper” with tracks from the forthcoming album Revolver including: “Dr. Robert,” “I’m Only Sleeping” plus “And Your Bird Can Sing.”

This was the fourth of five continuous weeks at the helm of the Top LPs chart. But Capitol now had their own full-blown controversy and had to recall the LP and replace the “butcher sleeve” with a more conventional cover featuring the Fab Four posing with travel trunks. The original albums was speedily asked to be returned from stores and other sources (many of the 750,000 copies were sent back to Capitol) costing the company scads of cash. Of course, there were a good amount of copies that weren’t returned. The ones that were, were given a pasted-on new cover and sent back to stores. The value today of both of those versions are among the most collectible and valuable LPs in the history of recorded music. The Mono versions are far less collectible than the Stereo versions, as the record label had pressed far less of the Stereophonic editions. And even though the song sequence was not what the Beatles intended, it was still a decent album—if for no other reason—we here in the Colonies got to hear some songs that had not been released yet across the pond. But the controversy over Yesterday And Today paled in comparison to the upcoming firestorm caused by John Lennon’s five month-old comments about the group being more popular than Jesus in a publication; culminating in a nervous apology in the coming weeks in ’66.

 

 

TOP SELLING R&B 

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 6)

 

HOLD ON! I’M COMIN’

 

SAM & DAVE

 STAX RECORDS


Produced by:

Bill “Smokey” Robinson

 

 

You would never know it, but Sam & Dave (Samuel David Moore of Miami, Florida and Dave Prater of Ocilla, Georgia) didn’t like each other; even though they’d performed for almost 10 years before reaching national fame with this album. They never entered the stage from the same side during live performances. AND Dave wasn’t able to do harmony with Sam, so if they sang together, they used the same notes, or used a call-and-response scenario. Listen to ANY song by this soul duo and you’ll hear it. This week’s No. 1 Top R&B LP (it’s only seven-day survey-period) contained the incredible title track; composed by the one and only Isaac Hayes, along with his writing partner and Songwriters Hall of Fame member David Porter.

The legend goes that Hayes tried to cajole Porter out of the bathroom at the Stax complex in South Memphis, as studio time was precious, and heard him say, “Hold on, I’m coming!” That’s all it took to make one of the best soul records of the era. The usual studio musicians at that time were basically Booker T & the M.G.’s, including Duck Dunn on bass, Steve Cropper on guitar and Al Jackson, Jr. Did you know that Booker T. Jones played a TUBA underneath the bass pattern of Dunn’s bass? True dat. The duo’s first single to reach the Hot 100 Singles chart “You Don’t Know What I Know” preceded “Hold On! I’m Comin’” and only reached No. 90 on that survey. It was the next to last cut on side two of the LP. There were no other singles taken from this set.




 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

AUGUST 20, 1977



HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77:

 

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 10) “YOU MADE ME BELIEVE IN MAGIC”

(Len Boone)

Produced by:

Harry Maslin                                                                                                


BAY CITY ROLLERS ARISTA0256

***************************************************************************

No. 9 (LW 9) “YOU AND ME”

(Alice Cooper / Dick Wagner)

Produced by:

Bob Erzin for Migration Records, Inc. –

A Black Widow/KRU Production.

 

ALICE COOPER WARNER BROS.8349

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 11) “JUST A SONG BEFORE I GO”  

(Words & Music – Graham Nash)

Produced by:

David Crosby, Stephen Stills & Graham Nash

With Ron Alpert and Howard Alpert

for Fat Alpert Productions  

 

CROSBY, STILLS & NASH ATLANTIC 3401

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 5) “DO YOU WANNA MAKE LOVE”

(Peter McCann)

Produced by:

Hal Yoergler for ABC Music Productions


PETER McCANN20th CENTURY 2335

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 8) “WHATCHA GONNA DO”

(Cory Lerios / Dave Jenkins)                                                         

Produced by:

Bill Schnee

 

PABLO CRUISE A&M1920

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 7) “EASY”

(Lionel Richie – Commodore)

Produced by:

John Carmichael & Commodores

Arranged by:

John Carmichael & Commodores

 

COMMODORES MOTOWN 1418

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 2) “I’M IN YOU”

(Peter Frampton)

Produced by:

Peter Frampton

                                                                   

PETER FRAMPTON A&M1941

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 4) “(YOUR LOVE HAS LIFTED ME) HIGHER AND HIGHER”

Billy Davis / Gary Jackson / Raynard Miller / Carl Smith)

 

Produced by:

David Anderle

Arranged by:

Booker T. Jones

 

RITA COOLIDGE A&M1922

 

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 1) “I JUST WANT TO BE YOUR EVERYTHING”

(Andy Gibb / Barry Gibb)

Produced by:

Albhy Galuten and Ken Richardson

For Karlbhy Productions

 

ANDY GIBB RSO872

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“BEST OF MY LOVE”

 

 (Maurice White / Albert McKay)             


Flip-Side:

“A FEELING IS”

 

EMOTIONS

 

COLUMBIA RECORDS10544


Produced by:

Maurice White 

For Kalimba Productions

Co-Produced by:

Clarence McDonald

Engineered by:

George Massenburg



While it wasn’t the leading hit of 1977, the Emotions came pretty close. With five weeks in the No. 1 position on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles chart, “Best Of My Love” was the second biggest (based on Billboard Magazine’s point system evaluation) by the trio of sisters, who got their start singing in church in Chicago. Wanda, Sheila and Pam Hutchinson take a trip on the wave of the popularity of Earth, Wind & Fire, whose leader Maurice White along with Al McKay wrote “Best Of My Love.” White’s Kalimba Productions was recognized with this piece of music shortly after Emotions were signed by Columbia Records. This was the initial of five non-consecutive weeks as the prime hit in America. Below are the former Gospel singers on Midnight Special in 1977. Oh…and so you know, the biggest hit of the year (in fact the entire decade) was Debbie Boone’s “You Light Up My Life.”

The Emotions were brought to the attention of the Staple Singers, who recommended to the suits at their label at the time (Stax/Volt Records in Memphis) to sign them. Emotions had some success in the Capitol of the Mid-South at Soulsville, U.S.A. on their Volt Records subsidiary, with songs like: “So I Can Love You” (No. 39 Pop) and “Put A Little Love Away”—a song later used by the PSFS Bank in Philadelphia as their commercial theme song—a darn good tune if you ask me. I bought the single; even though it only reached No. 73 on the national Pop Hot 100 Singles chart in ‘74. Once the Stax Empire lost their way and ended up bankrupt by ’75, the Emotions were label-less; until Columbia came-a-calling. Please indulge me with that song’s inclusion in this week’s feature. It’s a Big Jay fave. Famous 56 WFIL in Philadelphia gave this record a lot of airplay in ’74. Let me know what YOU think about it. A “Shoulda-been” hit for sure. Write me at BigJay@BigJaySorensen.com and tell me what you think about this really wonderful song. Unless you listened to Philadelphia AM stations in 1974, you likely never have heard this song written by phenomenal songwriters/producers Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter. Listen here.

The song was first recorded in ‘72 by Four Tops when Lambert & Potter was producing them after their defection from Motown. This song should have become a hit by somebody! Here’s Levi Stubbs and the Tops version complete with electric sitar!! I adored Four Tops, so indulge me. I just love the song.

 

TOP 50 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No.1

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“MY HEART BELONGS TO ME”

 

(Alan Gordon)

                                                                                      

Flip-Side:

“ANSWER ME”


BARBRA STREISAND

COLUMBIA RECORDS10555

 

Produced by:

Gary Klein –

 For the Entertainment Company

Co-Produced and Arranged by:

Charlie Calello

 

A No. 4 hit on the Hot 100 Singles chart, “My Heart Belongs To Me” was this week’s Top 50 Easy Listening Singles chart No. 1 45 RPM for Barbra Streisand on Columbia Records.  It was in the fourth and final survey-stage in the peak slot on that register. The tune was first recorded by Alan Gordon, best known as the co-writer of “Happy Together” and “She’d Rather Be With Me,” both made famous by the Turtles. Barbra Streisand had recorded the song, hoping for “My Heart Belongs To Me” to be included in her film co-starring Robert Redford; A Star Is Born. It wasn’t used for that project, but was included in her next LP called Streisand Superman.

The Diva’s album, Streisand Superman, reached No. 3 on the Top LPs & Tape listing of the biggest 200 LPs in the nation. The album sold over a million copies. Former Four Lovers member and brief 4 Seasons singer/bass player/arranger Charlie Calello co-produced Streisand’s recording with Gary Klein. Calello first practiced the song by just playing his piano with Barbra singing along. A full orchestra followed the next day for the recording. It was Calello who temporarily supplanted fired 4 Seasons co-founder Nick Massi (famously depicted in the Broadway play and film Jersey Boys) a fellow Newark, NJ native, who was then substituted in ’66 by long-time member Joe Long. “My Heart Belongs To Me” was the only charting single from Streisand’s LP.


 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“FLOAT ON”

 

(Marvin Willis / Arnold Ingram / James Mitchell)

 

Flip-Side:

“EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A REASON”

 

THE FLOATERS

ABC RECORDS12284


Executive Produced by:

Woody Wilson

For Fee Records, Inc.

Here’s a ‘One-Hit-Wonder’ in the No. 1 position on the Hot Soul Singles chart this week in ’77 from the Detroit vocal group, the Floaters with “Float On.” This spacey single was one of the biggest Soul hits of the year. The 45 RPM was in the second of six back-to-back weeks as the chief single on this chart. It reached No. 2 on the Pop Hot 100 Single list as well; with the LP of the same name gaining the pinnacle position on the Soul LPs listing. (**See below.) The tune revolved around the singers separately blustering about their quixotic ways, by first giving their astrological sign, then, proceeding to sing their own praises about how wonderful they’d be with a lover; almost like a competition advertising their wares to all the women of the world. After that, they told the ladies what they expect their perfect woman to be, and finally each guy asked the females to pick them and “come with me.” Sounds like a male cat-fight, doesn’t it? 

The over 11-minute song (on the LP) featured a couple of brothers Ralph and Paul Mitchell (not to be confused with the hair-care products namesake) along with singers Charles Clark and Larry Cunningham. Another Mitchell brother (and a member of the Detroit Emeralds) James co-wrote “Float On” based on a dream he had, along with (another Detroit Emeralds member) Marvin Willis and Arnold Ingram. Mercifully, the single was edited down to just over four minutes. Where was Weird Al Yankovic when we needed him? Fear not, as “Float On” was parodied quite well by Cheech & Chong (Richard “Cheech” Marin and Tommy Chong) as “Bloat On” later in 1977. Just for laughs, listen to their hysterical take as the BLOATERS lampooning the original.

The Cheech & Chong parody made it to No. 41 on the Hot 100 Singles chart on Ode Records. It showed up again in 1980 on the Cheech & Chong LP and, of course, 8-track called Let’s Make A New Dope Deal. Their parody is indeed far out, man and even MORE spacey.


THE

BIG
ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

AUGUST 20, 1977

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77:


No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

RUMOURS

FLEETWOOD MAC

WARNER BROS. RECORDS3010


Produced by:

Fleewood Mac

With Richard Dashut & Ken Caillat


Guitars and Vocals Arranged by

Lindsey Buckingham

Vocals Co-Arranged by:

Stevie Nicks


Engineered by:

Ken Caillat & Richard Dashut

Assisted by:

Cris Morris

This was the 15th of what would be a mammoth 31 non-consecutive survey-periods as America’s prime album on the Top LPs & Tape chart. Rumours was quite auto-biographical; a virtual journal of the crumbling of the relationships with practically all the members of the band. There was so much uneasiness; it’s startling that they were even able to conclude work on what would become their biggest album ever. The single “Don’t Stop” was climbing the Hot 100 Singles chart during this survey-period, and would enjoy a two-week stay at No. 3 at the end of September into early October in 1977. Here’s a live version of the tune.

The song “Don’t Stop” (written by Christine McVie who has rejoined the band after over a dozen years away) was used as a campaign theme for Bill Clinton’s first presidential aspiration. The song was about the break-up of Christine and John McVie, the band’s bass player and co-founder. Almost every cut on the LP was played on the radio, and several were good enough (in my opinion) to have been released as A side singles in addition to the 45 RPMs issued by Warner Bros. Records. The B side to the first single was called “Silver Springs” and was included on future re-issues of the LP, as it was intended to be included on the original release, but was cut by producers Ken Caillat and Richard Dashut due to time constraints. This is one of my fave Fleetwood Mac tracks.

The song was released on an album; a compilation LP called 25 Years - The Chain in ’92, and a concert version on the live album call The Dance in 1997. The album Rumours was the initial LP to feature four Top 10 Hot 100 singles by a group, including: “Go Your Own Way,” (No. 10 Pop) “Dreams,” (No. 1 Pop) “Don’t Stop,” (No. 3 Pop) and “You Make Loving Fun” (No. 9 Pop) all in 1977.  Rumours won a Grammy® for Album of the Year, and has sold over 19 million copies in the U.S. alone; over 45 million globally.


SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77:


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

FLOAT ON’

THE FLOATERS

 ABC RECORDS1030

Executive Produced by:

Woody Wilson

For FEE Records, Inc.

The Floaters eponymous LP was in the third of six concurrent weeks on the Hot Soul LPs chart this week in ’77. That’s Dennis Coffey on the guitar on the song “Float On.” Coffey was the king of the wah-wah on many records recorded in Detroit by not only Motown but other labels and his own releases as well. His best known solo recording was the million-selling instrumental “Scorpio” in ’71 on Sussex Records. (See “Float On” above in The BIG Singles section.)


 


 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

AUGUST 20, 1983

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 15) “I’LL TUMBLE 4 YA”

(Roy Hay / Jon Moss / Michael Craig / George O’Dowd)

Produced and Engineered by:

Steve Levine – For Do Not Erase Productions


CULTURE CLUB VIRGIN03912

***************************************************************************

No. 9 (LW 12) “PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ”

(Irving Berlin)

Produced by:

David Parker – An Original PSP-Production


TACO RCA13574

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 10)“(KEEP FEELING) FACINATION”    

(Philip Oakey / John Callis)

Produced by:

Martin Rushent and The Human League

Re-Mixed by:

Chris Thomas


THE HUMAN LEAGUE A&M2547 

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 5) “IS THERE SOMETHING I SHOULD KNOW”                           

(Duran Duran – Simon LeBon / Nick Rhodes / Andy Taylor / John Taylor / Roger Taylor)

Produced by:
Ian Little and Duran Duran

DURAN DURAN CAPITOL 5233

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 8) “IT’S A MISTAKE”

(Colin Hay)

Produced and Engineered by:

Peter McIan

MEN AT WORK COLUMBIA03959

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 6) “STAND BACK” 

(Stevie Nicks)

Produced by:

Jimmy Iovine

Engineered by:

Shelly Yakus


STEVIE NICKS MODERN 99863

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “MANIAC” 

(Michael Sembello / Dennis Matkosky)

Produced by:

Phil Ramone & Michael Sembello

 

MICHAEL SEMBELLO CASABLANCA812 516

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “SHE WORKS HARD FOR THE MONEY”

(Donna Summer / Michael Omartian)

Produced by:

Michael Omartian

Engineered by:

John Guess

 

DONNA SUMMER MERCURY812 370

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 2) “SWEET DREAMS (ARE MADE OF THIS)”  

(Annie Lenox / David A. Stewart)

Produced by:

David A. Stewart

                

EURYTHMICSRCA13533

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No.1 )

 

“EVERY BREATH YOU TAKE”

(Words & Music by Sting)

 

Flip-Side

“MURDER BY NUMBERS”

 

THE POLICE

A&M RECORDS2542

Produced by:

Hugh Padgham & The Police

 

After being apart for the better of one year, the Police re-grouped after their fourth album Ghost In The Machine, and recorded what would be their swan song and their biggest album while they were arguably, the biggest rock band in the world. On A&M Records, Synchronicity sold upwards of eight million copies in the U.S. alone and spawned several singles.  Obviously, “Every Breath You Take” was the exalted track from the album. The single was No. 1 for eight non-stop survey-phases during the almost the entire month of July into the last week of August of ’83 on the Hot 100 and was the biggest hit of the year; plus it was the fifth biggest of the entire ‘80s.

“Every Breath You Take” also reached No. 5 on the Adult Contemporary Singles list during its run. This was the seventh of eight contiguous weeks as the standard-bearer on the Hot 100 Singles register. (**See more about the song and LP below.)


 

TOP 50

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83

 

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY (Middle Road)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)


“ALL TIME HIGH”

(Music by John Barry

Lyrics by Tim Rice)

 

Flip-Side

“ALL TIME HIGH”

(Extended Instrumental Version)

 

RITA COOLIDGE

A&M2551

 

Produced by:

John Barry

Arranged and Conducted by:

John Barry

 

Rita Coolidge was the “Delta Lady” that Leon Russell wrote about for that song in ‘69, made most famous by Joe Cocker. Coolidge was a back-up singer for Russell, Cocker, Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie. Coolidge had the No. 1 song on Top 50 Adult Contemporary Single chart this week in ’83, with “All Time High,” the Theme from Octopussy; the James Bond flick starring Roger Moore. The 45 RPM was in the third of an ultimate four weeks capping this survey; written by Sir John Barry and Tim Rice.

Rita Coolidge also did work for Kris Kristofferson who was married to Rita from 1973 to 1980. She had five Top 40 hits on the Hot 100 from ’77 through ‘79, including: “(Your Love Has Lifted Me) Higher And Higher,” a million-selling single and a slower remake of the Jackie Wilson hit from ’67, another million-seller was “We’re All Alone” a remake of a Boz Scaggs song that reached No. 7 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 on the then Easy Listening Singles special survey. The other three Top 40 hits she had prior to “All Time High” (No. 36 Pop) were: “The Way You Do The Things You Do” another remake—this time from the pens of Smokey Robinson and Robert Rogers, famous by the Temptations ’64, a song (No. 25 Pop) called “You” and (No. 38 Pop) in ’79 called “I’d Rather Leave While I’m In Love” written by Peter Allen and Carole Bayer Sager. It took another four years to have what would become her last chart hit, “All Time High.” The song’s British-born musical composer, John Barry, died at his Oyster Bay, Long Island home in 2011.   

 


BLACK SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“GET IT RIGHT”

 

(Luther Vandross / Marcus Miller)

Flip-Side

“GIVING IN”


ARETHA FRANKLIN

ARISTA RECORDS – 9034

  

Produced by:

Luther Vandross

For Vandross, Ltd.

 

The good-lookin’-good-cookin’-right-rockin’ Sister Ree did it again, with another No. 1 record on the Black Singles chart this week in ’83 called “Get It Right,” produced and co-written by Arista Records label-mate, Luther Vandross. He had help with the composition from multi-instrumentalist and Jazz player, Marcus Miller. This was the Queen of Soul’s 19th No. 1 record on the Billboard R&B chart to this time in ’83.

The song “Get It Right” was also the title track from Lady Soul’s most recent album on Arista Records. Her comeback of sorts began with her prior single called “Jump To It” which was also a No. 1 R&B hit for four weeks. You could call “Get It Right” the right thing to do for her career. But even larger successes were soon to follow, as Aretha would have her biggest mass-appeal hits in over a decade in ’85 with “Freeway Of Love,” (No. 3 Pop & No. 1 Black—for five survey-periods) for her third straight Black Singles No. 1, and “Who’s Zoomin’ Who” which was a No. 7 Pop song and No. 2 Black singles hit. Franklin won a Grammy® for “Freeway Of Love” for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance. Aretha still had one more No. 1 Pop record in her, as she did a duet with British singer George Michael called “I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)” another Grammy® for Best R&B Vocal-Duo in ’87. Aretha (while not charting on the Hot 100 with this next  song) won yet another Grammy® for Best Traditional R&B Vocal in 2005 with “A House Is Not A Home” that was recorded for a tribute to her friend Luther Vandross on an album called So Amazing: An All-Star Tribute To Luther Vandross after his death earlier that year. That Burt Bacharach and Hal David song was originally recorded by Brook Benton in ’64 and was heard in the film A House Is Not A Home, starring Shelly Winters and Richard Todd. Dionne Warwick had a cover version that stopped the momentum of Benton’s 45 RPM; and both stalled in the ‘70s on the Hot 100 due to the competition.   

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week ENDING

AUGUST 20, 1983

 

TOP POP

ALBUMS 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:


No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


SYNCHRONICITY

THE POLICE  

A&M RECORDS3735


Produced by:

Hugh Padgham

and The Police

 

This was the fifth of an ultimate 17 non-consecutive weeks for this set of songs by the Police on A&M Records with Synchronicity. The only album that got in the way of Synchronicity for just one sole week at the top of the Top LPs list was Thriller from Michael Jackson in a few survey-phases. Thriller had a life of its own; but Synchronicity quieted-down the “Michael-Mania” for a few months in ’83. Like Cream from the ‘60s, this ‘80s trio packed a lot of sound into those three instruments and voices. (**See “Every Breath You Take” above.) The second single in America was “King Of Pain” which did a respectable No. 3 on the Hot 100, released in August of ’83 and had just been put out as a 45 RPM and cassette single.

The third single was “Synchronicity II” and that got to No. 16. Finally, “Wrapped Around Your Finger” reached No. 8 during the early part of ’84. The album is in the Grammy® Hall of Fame, and won a Grammy® for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group. In addition, “Every Breath You Take” won for Song of the Year for the writer Sting and it was awarded Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group. Andy Summers played guitar and piano on the LP and the amazing Stewart Copeland banged on the skins along with Sting’s bass. The album Synchronicity almost didn’t get made because the band was fighting with each other so much; the record company execs almost terminated the project. Somehow, producer Hugh Padgham and band manager Miles Copeland were able to get the project completed at George Martin’s AIR Montserrat in the Caribbean. During this era of the band’s history, Sting would occasionally record his bass parts while doing something quite odd. What was it that made the producer and drummer Stewart Copeland so annoyed? Sting played his bass on a mini-trampoline! Let’s just say, the other members of the group and the producers didn’t find it amusing; making the recording of Synchronicity and the previous LP Ghost In The Machine frustrating to put it mildly. Padgham has since said the tension ended up making it a great album. That it did.

 

 

BLACK

LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

THRILLER

MICHAEL

JACKSON

EPIC RECORDS38112

 

Produced by:

Quincy Jones


Rather than repeat what I’ve written about Thriller in past Big Jay’s Big Week in Pop Music History columns, let’s simply say the then current single in ’83 from the album was “Human Nature.” This was the fifth single from the set. Here’s Michael with a live performance of the tune.

Of the seven singles from Thriller, only three didn’t sell over a million copies. “Human Nature” was one of those three, and reached No. 7 on the Hot 100 and No. 3 Black Single. “Human Nature” was written by Toto’s keyboardist Steve Porcaro and John Bettis, who is in the Songwriters Hall of Fame for penning lyrics to songs from Carpenters, Diana Ross, Whitney Houston and countless others. 


**Special thanks to
www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.


(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
);