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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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July 31st, 2015

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

AUGUST 8, 1964

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 8) “I GET AROUND”

(Brian Wilson)

Produced by: Brian Wilson                      

THE BEACH BOYS CAPITOL5174

**************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 15) “I WANNA LOVE HIM SO BAD”

(Jeff Barry / Ellie Greenwich)                                   

Produced by: Jeff Barry & Steve Venet

Arranged by Ellie Greenwich             

THE JELLY BEANS RED BIRD10-003

***************************************************************************
No. 8 (LW 7) “DANG ME”  

(Roger Miller)                                                           

Produced by: Jerry Kennedy

ROGER MILLER SMASH 1881

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 11) “UNDER THE BOARDWALK”  

(Artie Resnick / Kenny Young)                                                           

Produced by: Bert Berns                              

Arranged by: Al Capps                                             

THE DRIFTERS ATLANTIC2237

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 6) “WISHIN’ & HOPIN’”

(Burt Bacharach / Hal David)                             

Produced by: John Franz

Directed by: (accompaniment) Ivor Ramonde

DUSTY SPRINGFIELD PHILIPS40207

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 2) “RAG DOLL” 

(Bob Crewe / Bob Gaudio)                                                 

Produced by: Bob Crewe                                   

THE 4 SEASONS

Featuring The “Sound” Of Frankie Valli PHILIPS  10345

 

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 3) “THE LITTLE OLD LADY (FROM PASADENA) 

(Don Altfeld / Roger Christian)                                           

Produced and Arranged by: Jan Berry, R. M. Lou Adler

Engineered by: (Harold) Lanky (Linstrot)

& (Dayton) Bones (Howe)

JAN & DEAN LIBERTY55704

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 5) “WHERE DID OUR LOVE GO”

(Eddie Holland /Lamont Dozier / Brian Holland)                                                        

Produced by: Brian Holland & Lamont Dozier      

THE SUPREMES MOTOWN1060

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 4) “EVERYBODY LOVES SOMEBODY” 

(Ken Lane / Irving Taylor)                                                  

Produced by: Jimmy Bowen

Arranged by: Ernie Freeman        

DEAN MARTIN REPRISE0281

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“A HARD DAY’S NIGHT"

 (John Lennon / Paul McCartney)

Produced by: George Martin

 

Flip-Side:

“I SHOULD HAVE KNOWN BETTER” (No. 53 Pop)

 

THE BEATLES

 

CAPITOL RECORDS5222

 

 

Ringo Starr had commented (to who is unknown) after a long day of filming in March of ’64 for the (up to that point) unnamed black & white feature film, that, “It was a hard day.” And when he saw it was dark outside, he added the word night. Thus the phrase A Hard Day’s Night was born. It is unclear if Ringo said it in front of John Lennon and/or Paul McCartney; but needless to say, the two lead songwriters found out about what Mr. Starkey said, which resulted in the malapropism becoming the title of the film. When the title was set, the only problem was a song had yet to be written that captured the phrase. So, as Lennon & McCartney had done so many times over the last couple of years, they wrote a ditty around the title in just a couple of days. They completed this title track in just nine takes at the EMI Studios at Abbey Road on April 16, 1964.

“A Hard Day’s Night” was in the second of two survey-periods as America’s biggest hit 45 RPM. Former Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive guitarist (and a worldwide respected musician) Randy Bachman has deconstructed the song’s opening chord that has baffled musicians since the song’s release in ’64. If you’re a guitar player, or you’re just curious what notes and chords were used to attain that opening, listen here.

The B side of “A Hard Day’s Night” was “I Should Have Known Better,” reaching No. 53 on the Hot 100. The soundtrack album on United Artists Records was in the No. 1 spot on the 150 titles Top LPs chart, featuring the songs in the film **(see below.) Over in the mother country, the British version of the album A Hard Day’s Night was also No. 1 there. But that album was not a “soundtrack,” but contained other songs recorded around the same time. The seven songs in the film were included on the UK version. Entering that chart this week in America was an album called Something New on Capitol Records, containing eight tracks in all; including songs from the EP (Extended Play) called Long Tall Sally including that song, “Slow Down,” “Matchbox,” “Anytime At All” and “I Call Your Name.” Also included was a German language version of “I Want To Hold Your Hand” called “Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand.”   

 

POP- STANDARD SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“EVERYBODY LOVES SOMEBODY”

 

(Ken Lane / Irving Taylor)

Produced by: Jimmy Bowen

Arranged by: Ernie Freeman

                                                        

Flip-Side:

“A LITTLE VOICE”

 

DEAN MARTIN

REPRISE RECORDS0281 

This was the second of an eventual eight consecutive weeks at the summit of the Pop-Standard Singles special survey for “Everybody Loves Somebody” by Dean Martin. The HIT version is heard below.

According to a published account, Martin told his Beatles-loving son Dean Paul Martin, “I will knock your pallies off the charts.” He meant those pesky rock & rollers. And he did it during the next survey-period in ’64. The then 47 year-old ‘King of Cool’ pushed “A Hard Day’s Night” by the Fab-Four out of the No. 1 slot on the Hot 100 Singles chart after their two-week run. “Everybody Loves Somebody” was only at the summit on that listing for a sole week (replaced by the Supremes with “Where Did Our Love Go,” but it proved ole Dino still had what it takes to be have a recording career-extending hit. The Rat-Pack/The Clan/The Summit suave guy had his first hit in almost six years (the last Top-20 hit was “Volare” in 1958) with “Everybody Loves Somebody” by Dean Martin on his buddy Frank Sinatra’s (by then owned by Warner Brothers) Reprise Records. Martin (Dino Paul Crocetti) had already recorded the song way back in 1948, but also wasn’t a hit by any one of the dozen or so major stars who put it on tape and released it on 78 RPM singles. Here’s a version I discovered that had Martin singing on the radio on the Bob Hope Show in ’48.

Flash forward to 1964. Martin wanted to record some of the “lounge” music he sang after hours in Vegas following his headlining shows in the big room. His producer, Jimmy Bowen (who had his own hit song career with “I’m Stickin’ With You,” and “Party Doll”) needed just one more track to fill out a Long-Player of those lounge tunes. Martin’s pianist/ conductor and the song’s co-writer Ken Lane (who would be the only person to co-star with Martin during all nine-years on TV’s The Dean Martin Show) suggested Dino re-record “Everybody Loves Somebody” in a Jazz-style with a four-piece combo for that album called Dreams With Dean by the Intimate Dean Martin. He must have liked it, as Martin’s producer rush-recorded yet another version; this time with a complete orchestra; arranged by Ernie Freeman. It was that adaptation that got to No. 1 last week on the Hot 100, and still on top of the Pop-Standard (or Middle-Road) special survey. Initially, the “hit” version got little or no reaction that third time around, with Reprise almost giving up on the 45 RPM release. But the label began getting information that the song was getting radio air-play in some markets across the country, and soon, Dino had his new signature song. That track was later included on the LP titled Everybody Loves Somebody -The Hit Version on Reprise. Dean Martin died on Christmas day, 1995 at age 78.

 

 

**NOTE:

There was no Hot R&B Sides Chart this week in ‘64, as Billboard Magazine stopped reporting this listing from November of ’63 through January of ’65. In its place, I have chosen the Cashbox Magazine Top 50 in R&B Locations Singles chart to portray the biggest R&B single this week in ’64.

 

CASHBOX

TOP 50

in R&B Locations

CHART

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“KEEP ON PUSHING”

 

(Curtis Mayfield)

 

 

Flip-Side:

“I LOVE YOU (YEAH)”

 

 

THE IMPRESSIONS

 

ABC-PARAMOUNT RECORDS – 10554

The Impressions were one of the ’60 most potent R&B hit-makers. But they got their feet wet while Jerry Butler and the Impressions had their first Pop hit in 1958 with the song (No. 11 Pop) “For Your Precious Love.” But by the mid-‘60s (with Butler long gone for a lucrative solo career) as well as other founding members, Curtis Mayfield ended up being the leader of what was now a trio. Those other two associates were Sam Gooden and Fred Cash, who replaced Butler in ’58. Mayfield started to mold the sound of the Impressions into his blend of R&B finery. But the Impressions were not able to crack the Pop Top 40 (except for “Gypsy Woman” No. 20 Pop) until late 1963 just before JFK was killed. That song was called “It’s All Right” and reached No. 4 on the Pop side and enjoyed a two-week stay on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles listing before Billboard ceased publishing a separate R&B 45 RPM register for over a year. But Cashbox did continue the practice of releasing a distinct chart for R&B singles; and in November of ’63, “It’s All Right” was that magazine’s No. 1 R&B 45 RPM for six survey-intervals. By now, the Impressions were sounding more and more like a Gospel group at times; while using more politically and socially-conscious choice of lyrics, penned by Mayfield. “I’m So Proud” (No. 14 Pop) preceded this week’s No. 1 single on the Cashbox Top 50; “Keep On Pushing” on ABC-Paramount Records.

“Keep On Pushing” got to No. 10 on the Hot 100. More hits in that vein continued for the Impressions, including: “Amen” (No 7 Pop and No. 1 on the Cashbox R&B singles list) as well as “People Get Ready” (No. 14 Pop) and by ’67, “We’re A Winner” certainly was (No. 1 Soul and No. 14 Pop) and in ’68 Mayfield and company put out a song called “This Is My Country” reaching No. 25 Pop and another chart-topping Soul single “Choice Of Colors,” getting to No. 25 on the Pop side. Mayfield realized he needed to go solo, and left the Impressions behind in 1970 for a stellar vocation which was marred by his getting injured during a performance. Mayfield eventually died of complications from his injuries in 1999.

  

 

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

AUGUST 8, 1964

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:

 

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

A HARD DAY’S NIGHT

 

THE BEATLES   

 

UNITED ARTISTS RECORDS6366

 

Produced by: 

George Martin

 


With the song “A Hard Day’s Night” in the No. 1 slot for second of two weeks at that chart’s summit, this was the third of an eventual 14 weeks for the soundtrack album of the same name as America’s top-seller. This set of recordings used in the film A Hard Day’s Night was destined to be a monster hit; filled with fervently awaited new material from the Fab Four this week in ’64. While you couldn’t really hear the music in the movie theaters due to mostly hysterical females—in the privacy of your bedroom, basement or even in your parent’s living room (with that big monophonic Hi-Fi piece of furniture) you could take it all in and enjoy it. The American LP was released on United Artists Records on July 10th, as the film company had the rights to the soundtrack. U.S. listeners didn’t realize it at the time, but there was a completely new album from the Liverpudlians released on Parlophone Records in the U.K. with many of the songs that we had to wait for on a Capitol release called Something New, released just 10 days later in America. The U.A. release in the states was stuffed with four filler instrumental Lennon/McCartney songs with arrangements by their producer George Martin. The American version featured the seven tunes performed in the film, plus “I’ll Cry Instead” which was not included in the flick at the last minute. If you bought the “stereophonic” version of the LP (for a dollar more) the Beatles’ tracks were actually reprocessed stereo—with more bass in one channel and more treble in the other—by simply using the mono masters and adding the illusion of stereophonic sound with a slight delay in one channel. I recall feeling like something was wrong at the time (not knowing just why) when in fact we were cheated out of a better experience, and had to wait for several years before the actual stereo masters of some tracks were released on vinyl albums; and then way later on either CD or downloads. George Martin and the group never intended their early songs (their first four British Parlophone albums) to be released in stereo; and to this day, Martin, McCartney and Starr insist their recordings from ’62 through ’68 were meant to be heard in glorious MONOPHONIC sound! To add insult to injury, several song titles were mis-spelled on some hastily issued U.A. album pressings of A Hard Day’s Night. Hey you Beatlemaniacs—that’s Norman “Hurricane” Smith their studio engineer playing the bongos on the track “A Hard Day’s Night” (**see above.) Here are the Beatles in their own words describing the making of the project.

Over in the mother country, the British version of the album A Hard Day’s Night was also No. 1 there. But that album was not a “soundtrack,” but contained other songs recorded around the same time. The seven songs in the film were included on that UK version. Entering that chart this week in America (at No. 135) was that album called Something New on Capitol Records, containing eight tracks that were recorded for the film; however, “I’ll Cry Instead” was NOT used in the final edit of the movie. Something New also included songs from the EP (Extended Play) called Long Tall Sally including that track, “Slow Down,” “Matchbox,” “Anytime At All” and “I Call Your Name.” Also included was a German language version of “I Want To Hold Your Hand” called “Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand.” Something New just missed being another No. 1 album from the Fab Four; reaching No. 2 in the U.S.A. and selling over two million copies. The Something New album only existed because the soundtrack on United Artists released for U.S. usage didn’t contain enough songs actually recorded from the “gear” guys. This week, their North American debut Capitol LP Meet The Beatles (No. 32) and The Beatles’ Second Album (No. 9 and holding steady) were both still on the Top LPs chart. It was fab being FAB!

**NOTE:

There was NO Hot R&B LPs chart during this period from Billboard, nor did Cashbox show a separate R&B LP list at this time. If anyone has copies of Record World’s R&B album charts, please get in touch with me at: BigJay@BigJaySorensen.com

Because I don’t have access to the Cashbox LP charts (yet) I used the highest charted R&B LP on the BILLBOARD Top LPs (POP) list to be the featured R&B album this week.

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:

 

MARY WELLS GREATEST HITS 

 

MARY WELLS

 

MOTOWN RECORDS616

Well, you can’t count Louis Armstrong’s album Hello Dolly as an “R&B” album, can you? I can’t. So, based on that premise, I looked down the list and found that the first true R&B artist on the Top LPs POP chart was Mary Wells, with Mary Wells Greatest Hits on Motown Records. It was currently in the No. 18 slot on the Pop Top LPs chart, with virtually all of the hits Wells had accumulated as their first premier female artist starting in 1961. All told, Mary Wells had three No. 1 R&B singles; starting with “You Beat Me To The Punch” on top for just a week (No. 9 Pop) in ’62, with the follow-up to that “Two Lovers” (No. 7 Pop) sitting in the prime position of the R&B singles list for four survey-periods. Then, Wells had the biggest hit of her life, “My Guy” (No. 1 Pop) landing at the crest of the R&B singles survey for seven weeks. Smokey Robinson was largely responsible for the songs she recorded as writer and producer; although Wells wrote her first hit back in ’61 called “Bye Bye Baby.” After that, Berry Gordy, Jr., Smokey Robinson and/or Holland-Dozier-Holland handled most of her output. Even though the song was two years old by the time this greatest hits album was released by Motown, I’d like to feature “Two Lovers” the second biggest hit of her career.  Here’s the only way to listen to early Motown—with the MONO single mix.

Another Big Jay fave is “The One Who Really Loves You” (No. 8 Pop) from early ’62. But after “My Guy,” how do you follow that up with another victorious record? Often, you don’t. Wells got some bad advice and left Motown! Just as she was reaching No. 1 nationwide with “My Guy” (for two weeks on the Hot 100 and seven survey-cycles on the R&B list during the middle of May ‘64) her husband and Motown staff member Herman Griffin, convinced her to end the deal with the company (already contained as a possibility in the wording of her contract) the day Wells turned 21 years-old on May 13, 1964.  For a hefty advance, she signed a new contract with 20th Century Records. However; without the Motown production, musicians, writing proficiency of Smokey and the exhilarating momentum that the “Sound of Young America” was enjoying, Wells was never able to achieve another hit single higher than No. 34 (“Use Your Head” on 20th Century Records) on the Hot 100 on any other label, including ATCO and Jubilee. She did have one dual-sided chart single (both songs reaching the lower teens on the Pop chart) as duets with Marvin Gaye, hastily released just after “My Guy” days after she gave notice. Still, you have to give her props for being Motown’s First Lady for a few years. About two-years after a diagnosis of throat cancer, Mary Wells died in July of 1992 at the age of 49.

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

AUGUST 2, 1975

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 11) “DYNOMITE – Part 1”

(Tony Camillo)

Produced and Arranged by:

Tony Camillo for Marcucci-Camillo Productions

Engineered by: Eddie Stasium

Tony Camillo’s BAZUKA A&M1666

 

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 10) “ROCKIN’ CHAIR”

(Clarence Reid / Willie Clarke)

Produced by:

Steve Alaimo, Willie Clark & Clarence Reid

Vocal Backgrounds Arranged and Sung by:

George & Gwen McCrae

 

GWEN McCRAE CAT1996

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 5) “LISTEN TO WHAT THE MAN SAID”  

(Paul McCartney)  

Produced by: Paul McCartney

Guitar: Dave Mason

Saxophone: Tom Scott

 

WINGS CAPITOL 11419

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 9) “MIDNIGHT BLUE”

(Melissa Manchester / Carole Bayer Sager)

Produced by: Vini Poncia

Executive Producer: Richard Perry

 

MELLISA MANCHESTERARISTA0116

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 8) “SOMEONE SAVED MY LIFE TONIGHT”

(Elton John / Bernie Taupin)

Produced by: Gus Dudgeon             

ELTON JOHN MCA40421

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 1) “THE HUSTLE”

(Van McCoy)

Produced by:

Hugo & Luigi (Hugo Peretti & Luigi Creatore)

Arranged and Conducted by:

Van McCoy  

VAN McCOY 

& THE SOUL CITY SYMPHONY

 AVCO – 4653



 

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “PLEASE MR. PLEASE”

(Bruce Welch / John Rostill)

Produced by: John Farrar                                                                   

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN MCA – 40418

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 7) “JIVE TALKIN’”

(Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb)

Produced by:

Arif Mardin by arrangement with the Robert Stigwood Organization.

BEE GEES RSO510

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 2) “I’M NOT IN LOVE”

(Graham Gouldman / Eric Stewart)

Produced by: 10cc

10cc MERCURY50910

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“ONE OF THESE NIGHTS”

 

 (Don Henley / Glen Frey)             

 

Flip-Side:

“VISIONS”

 

EAGLES

 

ASYLUM RECORDS45257

 

Produced by:

Bill Szymczyk

for Pandora Productions

 

 

 

Eagles were rapidly becoming America’s premier group by the time the LP One Of These Nights was released. This record pushed them into superstardom. The title track “One Of These Nights” reached the peak of the Hot 100 Singles chart during this sole survey-period in 1975. It was their second of an ultimate five No. 1 45 RPM releases; all on Asylum Records. The version we heard on Top 40 radio at the time was usually the edited rendition, leaving out the bass guitar notes in the introduction and faded out about 35 seconds before the LP version. Today, most radio stations (including my radio home CBS-FM 101.1 in NYC) play the longer version which was played on rock stations on FM at the time. Here’s the whole thing remastered.

 “One Of These Nights” was another example of the songwriting partnership of Don Henley and Glenn Frey. The  corresponding album called One Of These Nights was concurrently in the second of an ultimate five survey-cycles as the biggest LP in America (**see below.)

 

TOP 50 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75

No.1

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

 

“RHINESTONE

COWBOY”

 

(Larry Weiss)

                                                                                      

Flip-Side:

“LOVELIGHT”

 

GLEN CAMPBELL

 

CAPITOL RECORDS4095

 

Produced by:

Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter

Arranged by: Tom Sellers

 

The Pop music charts have always been filled with a variety of styles, but during 1975, almost all genres of music co-existed with numerous No. 1 songs that year on the Pop and Easy listening lists. This week's top Easy Listening single replaced another Country cross-over, “Please Mr. Please” by Olivia Newton-John on top of the chart. This new No. 1 single was written by Larry Weiss (I know his sister) who originally recorded it himself. Glen Campbell (no stranger to the Pop and Country charts) laid down this track called "Rhinestone Cowboy" for Capitol Records way before the title would also become a major motion-picture starring Sylvester Stallone and Dolly Parton. “Rhinestone Cowboy” would eventually reach the pinnacle of the Pop Hot 100 Singles list for two weeks in early September in 1975, and was on top of the Country list for three survey-periods.

Arkansas native Glen Campbell had a storied career. First as member of a small family combo, then a backup musician and one of the most sought after guitar-slinging studio cats in L.A. He became a superstar Country-crossover recording artist as a vocalist. Glen first recorded in 1961 with a No. 62 Hot 100 single “Turn Around, Look At Me” that was covered much more successfully by the Vogues in ’68. The song “Gentle On My Mind” (writen by John Hartford) won Grammy® Awards for Best Country Record, Best Country Song and Best Country Male Vocal. Campbell recorded several songs penned by Jimmy Webb, including Grammy® winning songs like “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” and his first million-selling single, “Wichita Lineman” (my personal fave) in late ’68 into early ’69. Later came “Galveston” another Webb tune. “Rhinestone Cowboy” was kind of a surprise to everyone, as Campbell hadn’t had a major hit since 1969; though he was a chart regular. “Rhinestone Cowboy” brought him back into the limelight in a big way. Less than two years later, Campbell took a song written by New Orleans-legend Allen Toussaint to the top of the Hot 100 one more time with “Southern Nights” in ’77. Glen retired from the music business after a farewell tour and (as of this writing) is now being cared for in a health-care facility with late stages of Alzheimer’s disease.           

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“FIGHT THE POWER
Part 1”

 

(Ernest Isley, Marvin Isley, O’Kelly Isley, Rudolf Isley & Chris Jasper)

 

Flip-Side:

“FIGHT THE POWER PART 2”

 

THE ISLEY BROTHERS

 

T-NECK RECORDS2256

 

Produced and Arranged by:

Ernest Isley, Marvin Isley, O’Kelly Isley, Ronald Isley, & Chris Jasper

 

You have to know that Richard Nixon had resigned his office of the presidency not long after this record was written by the Isley Brothers on T-Neck Records. It was an angry song—angry about more than just crooked political figures. It still sounds livid today. It was also the last million-selling single for the Isley Brothers, whose history goes back to almost the beginning of Rock & Roll. They originally came from Cincinnati, Ohio beginning as a Gospel quartet with one other brother. Secular music came a-calling, and eventually, the Isley’s could be romantic on one release, Gospel-fueled, funky or Disco-fied on the next and then politically charged with a rock background on the follow-up. This was the last of three back-to-back weeks as the principal 45 RPM on the Hot Soul Singles chart during this survey-cycle in ’75 for “Fight The Power Part 1.” Your Biggest Jay found an even longer version—so you could call this “Fight The Power Parts 1, 2 & 3.” It cooks.

Though they never had a No. 1 Hot 100 hit, they had four chart-toppers on various names for R&B singles charts. The Isley Brothers created a classic in the history of Rock & Roll way back in 1959 with “Shout – Part 1.” Actually, in modern times (when IS that by the way???) the song was extended by simply adding Part 2 to the first portion of the song the way it should have been all along. But because record makers didn’t think anything over five minutes could be put on a 45 RPM, it was split in half via both sides of the vinyl. The song is entrenched in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the Grammy® Hall of Fame and is considered by some to have been their finest hour. I’ll have more about the Isley Brothers and their incredible history in the Soul LPs section below.

 

THE

BIG
 ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

AUGUST 2, 1975

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

 

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

ONE OF THESE NIGHTS

 

EAGLES

 

ASYLUM RECORDS7E-1039

 

Produced by:

Bill Szymczyk

 

Knowing what we know now about Eagles, it’s almost hard to believe that this, their fourth LP was the first to be a No. 1 album on the Top LPs & Tape chart. In addition to being the No. 1 45 RPM in America with the title track “One Of These Nights” this week, the follow-up single from this set was “Lyin’ Eyes” which almost reached No. 1; just missing the apex at No. 2 for a couple of weeks later in the year. That song won Eagles a Grammy® for Best Pop Vocal Duo, Group or Chorus. Here’s a live version from a 1977 Eagles concert.

The country-rock ballad “Take It To The Limit” was the third single from One Of These Nights, reaching No. 4 on the Pop singles register; remaining on the Hot 100 for 23 week—an eternity in the ‘70s. This album was the last to feature guitarist/vocalist Bernie Leadon, who was also the last to join the group during their formation. He didn’t like the harder rock direction of Eagles, after they had been linked to a blend of Country and Rock from their genesis. Interestingly, just after Leadon quit the band, Asylum Records released Their Greatest Hits 1971 – 1975; virtually tied with Thriller from Michael Jackson as the biggest selling LP in the U.S. of all time. Joe Walsh replaced Leadon in Eagles for their next project that became known as Hotel California.

 

SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘75:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

THE HEAT

IS ON

 

 

THE ISLEY BROTHERS

 

 T-NECK RECORDS33536

 

Produced by:

Ernie Isley, Marvin Isley, O’Kelly Isley, Ronald Isley, Rudolf Isley & Chris Jasper

This was the third Isley Brothers album to include two of their younger brothers, Marvin and Ernie, along with Chris Jasper. They certainly lived up to the name of the album, The Heat Is On, as the expanded band was able to crank things up a several degrees. The Heat Is On was also the very first album from the Isley clan to reach No. 1 on the Top LPs & Tape Pop chart. It would do that for a sole (soul) week in September of ’75, based on the strength of this week’s hottest Soul single. “Fight The Power Part 1” (**see above) was the biggest Hot Soul Singles chart hit this week in ’75. Their album was in the third of an ultimate four non-consecutive survey-stages in the prime position. But in order to talk about the Isley Brothers, you can’t do it without mentioning their cover version of “Twist And Shout” 13 years prior. Certainly, the Beatles gave the song their own twist, becoming a staple of parties across the globe, but the Fab Four got their idea from that Isley cover of a song originally recorded by a group called the Top Notes, when the song was titled “Shake It Up, Baby” in ’61. That original track was written by the great Bert Berns and Phil Medley. Berns thought that producer Phil Spector ruined his song, so he produced the Isley Brothers version and the rest is history. The Isley’s rendition utilized some of the greatest session musicians around, including: King Curtis on sax, Cornell Dupree on guitar, the masterful Chuck Rainey on bass and Gary Chester on drums among others. But wait a minute. How about their time at Motown? The Funk Brothers superbly backed the vocal group on (No. 12 Pop) “This Old Heart Of Mine (Is Weak For You)—certainly one of the greats of the mid-‘60s, as was “I Guess I’ll Always Love You” (No. 61 Pop) both written and produced by Holland-Dozier-Holland. And at the end of the decade, after the brothers decided to break free and create their own kind of music, they had their first certified million-selling single with “It’s Your Thing” the unveiling release on their own T-Neck Records label. That was named after their adopted hometown in New Jersey called Teaneck. That song won a Grammy® Award for Best R&B Vocal Group for the Isley Brothers in 1969. By 1973, the three brothers added their younger brother Ernie and Marvin, plus their brother-in-law Chris Jasper to the line-up, and they scored with the scorching “That Lady (Part 1)” that was their second million-seller. The follow-up single to “Fight The Power Part 1” was called “For The Love Of You Part 1 & 2. Here it is from the album The Heat Is On.

This album eventually sold over two million copies. “For The Love Of You Parts 1 & 2” reached No. 22 on the Hot 100 Singles Pop listing and scored quite high on the Hot Soul Singles chart. After this album, there was quite a lull from the mid-‘70s through the mid-‘90s for the group. The younger ones broke away to form their own band. O’Kelly Isley died in 1982 at age 48. Younger brother Marvin passed away in 2010 at age 56. But the Isley’s figured out a way to stay relevant well into the new millennium. 

 


 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

AUGUST 7, 1982

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 7) “DON’T YOU WANT ME”

(John Callis / Phillip Oakey / Phillip Wright)

Produced by: Martin Rushent and The Human League  

THE HUMAN LEAGUE A&M2397

***************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 9) “ONLY THE LONELY”

(Martha Davis)

Produced by: Val Garay

THE MOTELS CAPITOL5114

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 10)“KEEP THE FIRE BURNIN’”    

(Kevin Cronin)

Produced by: Kevin Cronin, Gary Richrath, Kevin Beamish and Alan Gratzer

REO SPEEDWAGON EPIC02967

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 8) “EVEN THE NIGHTS ARE BETTER”                           

(J. L. Wallace / Kenneth Bell / Terry Skinner)

Produced and Engineered by: Harry Maslin

AIR SUPPLY ARISTA 0692

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 2) “ROSANNA”

(David Paich)

Produced by: Toto

Horn Arrangements by: Jerry Hey and David Paich

TOTO COLUMBIA02811

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 6) “HARD TO SAY I’M SORRY” 

(Peter Cetera / David Foster)

Produced by: David Foster

CHICAGO FULL MOON 29979

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “HOLD ME” 

(Christine McVie / Robbie Patton

Produced by:

Lindsey Buckingham, Richard Dashut, Ken Caillat and

Fleetwood Mac 

FLEETWOOD MAC WARNER BROS. 29966

 

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 5) “ABRACADABRA”

(Steve Miller)

Produced by:

Steve Miller and Gary Mallaber Under license from

Sailor Records

THE STEVE MILLER BAND
CAPITOL5126

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 3) “HURT SO GOOD”

(John Cougar Mellencamp / George Michael Green)

Produced by:

John Cougar Mellencamp and Don Gehmar                

JOHN COUGARRIVA209

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“EYE OF THE TIGER”

 (Frankie Sullivan / Jim Peterik)

 

Flip-Side

“TAKE YOU ON A SATURDAY”

  

SURVIVOR

 

SCOTTI BROTHERS02912

 

Produced by:

Jim Peterick and Frankie Sullivan

 

 

This week in ’82 was the third of six-straight survey-periods as the biggest single in America for the rock band Survivor, with the theme from the film Rocky III, “Eye Of The Tiger.” Sylvester Stallone face-to-face asked the group to work on a song for the forthcoming motion picture, as he couldn’t acquire the rights to the Queen tune, “Another One Bites The Dust.” The Guinness Book of World Records claims “Eye Of The Tiger” is the 33rd biggest-selling record ever; combining physical sales (vinyl/cassette/CD) with digital downloads; over nine million copies altogether. 

Of course, “Eye Of The Tiger” has a long way to go to becoming the biggest seller of ALL TIME. That tip-of-the-hat goes to “White Christmas” by Bing Crosby, with over 50 million copies vended globally. Ok, forget Der Bingle. And now, back to Survivor. The band was born in Chicago with one-time Ides Of March founder and lead-singer (of “Vehicle”- fame...ya know, “I’m your vehicle baby, I’ll take you anywhere you want to go”) Jim Peterik entering the band Survivor. Their second LP called Premonition had a song on it called “Poor Man’s Son.” That’s the tune that got the interest of Stallone, who wanted something that had that equivalent feel. Here’s that song for demonstration purposes.

Stallone got that similar feel with “Eye Of The Tiger.” The tune featured Dave Bickler on lead vocals, along with Peterick on backing vocals, guitars and keyboards, with Jim’s co-writer Frankie Sullivan on lead guitar and backing vocals, Marc Droubay on drums and Stephen Ellis on bass guitar. Both songwriters Peterick and Sullivan also arranged and produced the track and all of the songs on their attached LP, except one song that Jim wrote himself. The follow-up had the impossible task of topping “Eye Of The Tiger,” with “American Heartbeat” stalling at No. 17 on the Hot 100. But, Survivor became survivors, as they continued to have big hits through the ‘80s, with a new lead singer, Jimi Jamison, who sang on 1984’s “The Moment Of Truth” from the flick The Karate Kid, stalling at No. 63 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. Later that year, Survivor scored again with “I Can’t Hold Back” (No. 13 Pop) then the ’85 hits “High On You,” (No. 8 Pop) and (No. 4 Pop) “The Search Is Over.” They had another smash in ‘86 (No. 2 Pop) with “Burning Heart” from another Stallone project, the film Rocky IV. Survivor had one more Top 40 hit, “Is This Love” (No. 9 Pop) at the end of ’86 into ’87. Turns out Survivor didn’t make it beyond the ‘80s as hit-makers. The second Survivor lead singer Jimi Jamison died in Memphis in September of 2014 at age 63.

 

TOP 50

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82

 

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY (Middle Road)

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“EVEN THE NIGHTS ARE BETTER”

(J. L. Wallace / Kenneth Bell /

Terry Skinner)

 

Flip-Side

“ONE STEP CLOSER”

  

AIR SUPPLY

 

ARISTA0692

 

Produced and Engineered by:

Harry Maslin


Though they’d had some success in Australia for a few years, it wasn’t until Arista Records’ boss Clive Davis suggested the group re-record a song called “Lost In Love” was a six-week chart-topper on the Adult Contemporary list (No. 3 Pop) in early 1980 and stars were born internationally. Their second single “All Out Of Love” was a million-selling 45 RPM and reached No. 2 for four weeks on the Hot 100. Their third single attained the No. 5 peak position on the Pop chronicle in America in early ’81. Their next hit was a No. 1 Pop hit; their only one as you’ll see below. Move up to this week in 1982 after two more No. 5 Pop hits, and this was the third of four consecutive survey-stages as the biggest 45 RPM on the Top 50 Adult Contemporary survey for Australia’s Air Supply with “Even The Nights Are Better” on Arista Records. The record was the third and final chart-topper on the Adult Contemporary list, after 1980’s “Lost In Love” (No. 3 Pop) and ‘81’s (No. 5 Pop) “Here I Am (Just When I Thought I Was Over You.) Surprisingly, Air Supply’s only No. 1 hit on the Pop Hot 100, “The One That You Love,” didn’t attain the principal position on that list, even though it was a their second million-selling single. “Even The Nights Are Better” was from Air Supply’s seventh U.S. LP release, Now And Forever and was their third straight single to peak at No. 5 on the Hot 100.

The group at this stage of their careers consisted of: Russell Hitchcock, the lead singer, Graham Russell on guitar, David Moyse also on guitar, Rex Goh from Singapore also on guitar, Frank Esler-Smith on keyboards and the group’s arranger, plus Criston Barker on bass and Ralph Cooper on drums. The line-up of musicians in Air Supply was like a revolving door for recording and touring purposes including their time in Australia as struggling musicians until they stopped having hits in the mid-‘80s. The follow-up single to “Even The Nights Are Better” was called “Young Love,” and it stalled on the Pop side at No. 38, as did the next single “Two Less Lonely People In The World.” A change in producers got the group back in the upper reaches of both Pop and Adult Contemporary charts; with Jim Steinman’s “Making Love Out Of Nothing At All.” Steinman used all of the bombast and his unique production skills to raise the bar from the usual soft-rock schmaltz previously used by Air Supply. “Making Love Out Of Nothing At All” was their last million selling song, and the group’s final time in the Top 10 on the Pop chart reaching No. 2 for three solid weeks.   

 

BLACK SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82

 

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“AND I AM TELLING YOU I’M NOT GOING”

 

(Lyrics: Tom Eyen /

Music: Henry Krieger)

 

Flip-Side

“FAKE YOUR WAY TO THE TOP” – CAST

 

Dreamgirls Original Broadway Castsung by

JENNIFER HOLLIDAY

 

GEFFEN RECORDS – 29983

  

Produced by:

David Foster 

Dreamgirls was a smash on Broadway; with this signature song “And I’m Telling You I Am Not Going” from the play performed by Jennifer Holliday as character Effie White. The song was the biggest hit for the third of four back-to-back survey-cycles on the Black Singles chart this week in ’82. Don’t confuse Jennifer Holliday (who won a Tony® Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress AND a Grammy® for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance from the Broadway version) with the film’s star Jennifer Hudson, who won an Oscar® for her role in the movie. Hudson’s version was a smaller hit in 2006. Holliday performed the song “And I Am Telling You I Am Not Going” as the closing scene in the first act, attaining thunderous applause from the Broadway audiences. Here’s a sample.

Unfortunately, despite her success with the play, Holliday was unable to regain her momentum as a recording artist, as she never got higher than No. 49 on the Hot 100 (“I Am Love”) and was off the charts completely by 1986. She did sing on Foreigner’s hit “I Want To Know What Love Is”—a two-million-seller along with the New Jersey Mass Choir and only No. 1 song by the band in early ’85.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week ENDING

AUGUST 7, 1982


TOP POP

ALBUMS 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 3)

 

 

MIRAGE

 

FLEETWOOD MAC  

 

WARNER BROS. RECORDS

1-23607

 

Produced by:

Lindsey Buckingham,

Richard Dashut, Ken Caillat & Fleetwood Mac 

This week in ’82, the biggest LP in America was the album Mirage from Fleetwood Mac. Largely recorded at Le Château in Hérouville France, this Long-Player was the follow-up to a confusing two-album set called Tusk, released in 1979. That mess was preceded by Rumours, perhaps the best album of the ‘70s. So was this “back to normal” for Fleetwood Mac? If you mean being more Pop, or soft-rock-oriented, perhaps. But in terms of liking-each-other? Hell no. Tensions were worse than when they made Rumours due to the continued loathing of certain former or current lovers due to infidelities, drug use and creative differences. The first and current single from Mirage was a return to melodic Pop. But that 45 RPM, “Hold Me,” was set to stall in the No. 4 space on the Hot 100 Singles chart during this survey-period. I happen to like the song; sung largely by Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie; as she co-wrote “Hold Me” with a guy named Robbie Patton.

The video for “Hold Me” is quite odd; and certainly was filmed under duress (as described above) because the members of the band couldn’t stand to be near each other—let alone work together in the desert heat. To begin with, it is amazing Fleetwood Mac was able to finish the album. Plus, it’s a tribute to the production crew for even getting the video completed; when the band refused to work together. Producers had to do some creative editing to make it look like a group effort. The follow-up single to “Hold Me” was another Stevie Nicks pleasant, if not quirky song called “Gypsy.”

“Gypsy” was able to only rise to No. 12 on the Hot 100 in the autumn of ’82. One final single sprang from the LP Mirage called “Love In Store,” another Christine McVie composition, co-written by a guy named Jim Recor, who was Kenny Loggins’ manager. Recor’s wife, Sara (while still married to Jim) was living with Mick Fleetwood (still married to Jenny Fleetwood) who had also had a recent affair with Nicks after the arduous break-up between Stevie and Lindsey while Rumours was being recorded. Jim Recor had a fling with Stevie Nicks even before this happened. Add copious amounts of cocaine to the mix, and you see the recipe for disaster. Sara must be THE “Sara” sung about by Stevie Nicks on the Tusk album, as oddly, they became friends. Did ya follow that? Good. Explain it to me please. I guess the Southern California lives of international rock stars in the decadent ‘70s carried over to the awesome ‘80s. Fleetwood Mac didn’t release another album after Mirage for nearly five years. And that album called Tango In The Night did significantly better sales-wise than Mirage. Fleetwood Mac continues to tour, now that they can all speak to each other. Their On With The Show tour (that successfully landed in the U.S.) will end up in Auckland, New Zealand of all places in November of 2015.   

 

BLACK LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

GAP BAND IV

THE GAP BAND

 

TOTAL EXPERIENCE RECORDS3001

 

Produced by:

Lonnie Simmons

This record was, in fact, the fifth album from the Gap Band, but they called it their fourth. Huh? Gap Band IV was released on Total Experience Records, affiliated with Mercury/Polygram at the time. The album Gap Band IV was in the sixth of an ultimate nine uninterrupted survey-cycles as the foremost record on the Black LPs listing this week in ’82. It reached as high as No. 14 on the Top LPs & Tape Pop chart. The initial single from this set was “Early In The Morning” which climbed to the apex position on the Black Singles chart for three non-consecutive weeks in June and early July of ’82.

The next single had just been released called “You Dropped A Bomb On Me,” and first landed on the Black Singles chart next week.

“You Dropped A Bomb On Me” reached a very healthy No. 2 on the Black Singles chart in the fall of ’82; and while not gaining as high a slot on the Hot 100 Pop list (No. 31) it is perhaps better known today than their highest Pop chart hit (No. 24) “Early In The Morning.” They had one more No. 1 R&B hit from Gap Band VI called “Outstanding” in the spring of ’83. After that, the Gap Band wasn’t as outstanding as they used to be and virtually disappeared from the Pop chart. They did have another No. 2 Black Singles hit called “All Of My Love” in ’89. The Gap Band’s use of electro-funk served them well, with “Uncle” Charlie Wilson usually singing lead, along with his brothers Robert and Ronnie. Uncle Charlie (supposedly nicknamed by Snoop Dog) ended up with a fairly successful solo career in the 00’s and ‘10s after the Gap Band went its way.


**Special thanks to
www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.


(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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