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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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July 24th, 2015

THE

BIG
SINGLES

 

 

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

AUGUST 3, 1968

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 18) “SUNSHINE OF YOUR LOVE”

(Jack Bruce / Peter Brown / Eric Clapton)           
Produced by: Felix Pappalardi by arrangement with Robert Stigwood                        
(*THE) CREAM
*This was how it was listed on originally released 45 RPM from January, 1968—this was a re-released single)
 ATCO6544

***************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 11) “TURN AROUND, LOOK AT ME”
(Jerry Capehart)                                                      
Produced by: Dick Glasser                                              
Arranged and Conducted by: Ernie Freeman         
THE VOGUES
REPRISE0686

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 5) “THE HORSE”  

(Jesse James)                                                            
Produced by: Jesse James                                  
Arranged by: Bobby Martin

CLIFF NOBLES & CO.  
PHIL—L.-A. OF SOUL 313

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 2) “LADY WILLPOWER  

(Jerry Fuller)                                                           
Produced by: Jerry Fuller                                 
Arranged by: Al Capps                                              

GARY PUCKETT AND THE UNION GAP
COLUMBIA44547 

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No. 6 (LW 4) “JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH”

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richard)                             
Produced by: Jimmy Miller               

THE ROLLING STONES
LONDON908

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No. 5 (LW 6) “HURDY GURDY MAN” 

(Donovan Leitch)                                                      
Produced by: Mickie Most    
DONOVAN
EPIC 10345

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 1) “GRAZING IN THE GRASS” 

(Philemon Hou)                                                          
Produced by: Stuart Levine for CHISA Productions
                                                        

HUGH MASEKELA
UNI55066 

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No. 3 (LW 3) “STONED SOUL PICNIC”

(Laura Nyro)                                                        
Produced by: Bones Howe – A Binder/Howe Production                                                           
Arranged by: Ray Pohlman (Vocal Coach) Bob Alcivar (Vocals) & Bill Holman (Bass, Horns & Strings)                                            
THE 5th DIMENSION SOUL CITY766

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 8) “CLASSICAL GAS” 

(Mason Williams)                                                   
Produced by: Mike Post                                                              
Arranged by: Mike Post                                                        

MASON WILLIAMS
WARNER BROS. —  SEVEN ARTS7190

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 9)

 

“HELLO, I LOVE YOU, WON’T YOU TELL ME YOUR NAME”*
*This was how it was listed on originally released 45 RPM with black, orange and white label.

 (The Doors: John Densmore / Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek / Jim Morrison)

Produced by: Paul Rothchild
Engineered by: Bruce Botnick

 

Flip-Side:

“LOVE STREET”

THE DOORS

 

ELEKTRA RECORDS55580

 


 

A big leap from No. 9 to No. 1 this week on the Hot 100 Singles listing for “Hello, I Love You” (on the original release with the label seen above, it was listed as “Hello, I Love You, Won’t You Tell Me Your Name.” For the second run of 45 RPM releases, the name was shortened to what it was to begin with, “Hello, I Love You.” That makes the initial pressings somewhat collectible. The song was written in 1965 when pals Jim Morrison and Ray Manzarek were walking on the beach in Venice, California. Jim and Ray reportedly watched an African-American girl walk passed them, and either said, or thought, “Hello, I love you, won’t you tell me your name?” I have a feeling Morrison said it out loud.

This was the first of two back-to-back survey-periods in the pinnacle position on the Hot 100 for “Hello, I Love You.” When the Doors were recording their third album (later titled Waiting For The Sun) they brought out the old poem Morrison had written for inclusion on the LP. Reportedly, drummer John Densmore almost left the band during the sessions, claiming Morrison was too inebriated at times to sing. You could see him drinking a beer in the video above. Somehow, they got the tracks done. A number of fans of their first two albums thought this single was a sell-out, as it was short, not progressive enough; yet, actually had a great hook. Some critics thought it was lacking in originality. There were also other problems with the song “Hello, I Love You,” as Ray Davies of the Kinks wanted to sue the Doors for copying a part of their 1964 recording “All Day And All Of The Night.” Doors member Robby Krieger said it wasn’t true. Krieger claimed, if anything, the riff was similar to Cream’s hit, “Sunshine Of Your Love” which was also riding high on the Hot 100. That song had been around for about seven months, as it had first been released in January and originally peaked at No. 36 on the Pop singles list. Cream’s single (a shortened version from their LP called Disreali Gears was re-released several months later and would peak at No. 5 and become a million-selling 45 RPM. “Hello, I Love You” was also a million-seller; the Doors’ second of three. The Doors were not considered a “singles” band, but were able to have 14 singles reach the Hot 100 featuring Jim Morrison. He had left the group on December 12, 1970 after the recording of the LP L.A. Woman. The cause of his death in Paris is still a mystery; although no autopsy was performed after his death on July 3, 1971 at age 27. Keyboard player Ray Manzarek died of cancer on May 20, 2013. Guitarist Robbie Krieger and drummer John Densmore are the surviving members. During their recording career while Morrison was alive, various bass guitar players were used on recording sessions. Douglass Lubahn performed on “Hello, I Love You” and was reportedly asked to officially join the group as its fifth member, but he declined due his faithfulness to his own psychedelic band, Clear Light. The single, “Hello, I Love You,” preceded the LP Waiting For The Sun by a few weeks. This week on the Top LPs chart, Waiting For The Sun debuted at No. 110; heading for No. 1 in the weeks ahead. Oddly, it was the Doors’ only No. 1 album! Prior to the release of “Hello, I Love You,” Elektra Records unleashed “The Unknown Soldier” as the first single, months before the release of the LP. It just barely cracked into the Top 40 at No. 39; although it was a popular album track on progressive FM radio stations.  

 

 

TOP 40 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“THIS GUY’S IN LOVE WITH YOU”

 

(Hal David / Burt Bacharach)
Produced by: Herb Alpert &       Jerry Moss
 
Arranged by: Burt Bacharach

 

Flip-Side:

“QUIET TEAR”

 

HERB ALPERT

A&M RECORDS929 

The biggest hit of the week on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles special survey was in its ninth of an eventual 10 week run at the summit of that chart, with Herb Alpert’s HIT singing debut; “This Guys In Love With You”—a Hal David / Burt Bacharach composition. It wasn’t the first song Alpert would record singing; but his version of “Close To You” was passed on being released after the engineer said it “stunk,” and instead, Alpert handed it over to budding stars the Carpenters two years later. However, Herb’s second choice topped the Pop singles chart for four survey-cycles in ’68 with “This Guy’s In Love With You” on A&M Records, which he co-owned. It had begun that four-week phenomenon on the Hot 100 initially during the chart period ending Jun 22nd. It was initially a monster on the Top 100 Easy Listening Singles special survey starting with the week ending on June 8th; essentially the top 45 RPM of the late spring and a good part of the summer of ’68 on that list.

The song was made for a TV special and included on the Alpert LP Beat Of The Brass. Popular demand forced the release of the song; with Herb singing to his first wife Sharon on the show. Just 11 years later, Alpert would be the first (and perhaps only artist in the rock era) to have a vocal No. 1 song (on the Pop singles chart) and an instrumental Pop chart-topper with the song “Rise.” Alpert did sing on a couple of other later releases with limited success. Truth be told, it wasn’t the first time Herb used his vocal chords instead of his lips on a record. That project was under an assumed name way back in 1962, and was purchased by Dot Records for national distribution with a song named “Tell It To The Birds.” It was only a regional hit in Southern California; but it gave Alpert and his partner Jerry Moss enough capital to record the single, “The Lonely Bull” the first chart hit later in ’62 as The Tijuana Brass featuring Herb Alpert. That 45 RPM (No. 6 Pop) created the beginning of an empire; not only for that act (in reality just Alpert and studio cats, later known as The Wrecking Crew) but for A&M Records.

 

BEST SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“GRAZING IN THE GRASS”

 

(Philemon Hou)
Produced by: Stuart Levine for CHISA Productions

 

Flip-Side:

“BAJABULA BONKE (THE HEALING SONG)”

 

HUGH MASAKELA

UNI RECORDS55066 

South African trumpet player Hugh Masekela continued to hold on to the No. 1 spot on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles register this week in ’68 on UNI Records with “Grazing In The Grass.” UNI Records was under the arm of Universal Studios that also wanted in on this Pop music thing. This was the last of four back-to-back weeks at this chart’s zenith for the instrumental—in a year when instrumentals had a good run—including songs like: “Love Is Blue,” “Soul Limbo,” “The Good, The Bad & The Ugly,” “Classical Gas” and others. “Grazing In The Grass” had also been at the crest of the Hot 100 Singles chart for two survey-stages, beginning with the week ending July 20, 1968. “Grazing In The Grass” was a song Masekela was given by a friend, performer and songwriter from South Africa named Phelemon Hou. Handed the song on tape, Hugh adapted it after one of his band member’s heard it, recommending the song as a last minute filler track for the album The Promise Of The Future based on Hou’s performance. It’s been reported Hou was in the studio and helped come up with the final melody while the backing track was recorded in L.A.  

Swamped with requests to add lyrics to “Grazing In The Grass,” an official license to do just that was given to RCA Records. A remake of “Grazing In The Grass” was a hit in 1969 by the vocal group Friends Of Distinction who reached the No. 3 position on the Hot 100 and No. 5 on the R&B chart. Lyrics to that version were written by group member Harry Elston. A group member of the Friends Of Distinction, Jessica Cleaves, died last May at age 65. A footnote in the history of Pop music; Hugh Masekela was the guy who played the horn solo on the minor tongue-in-cheek hit by the Byrds (No. 29 Pop) “So You Want To Be A Rock & Roll Star” in early ’67. For a hoot, let’s watch the Byrds perform that song.

Masekela’s music was labeled as “Afro-Jazz.” Early in his life, Masekela took up trumpet at age 15 after seeing the 1950 motion-picture Young Man With A Horn, starring Kirk Douglas, Doris Day, Lauren Bacall and Hoagie Carmichael.  That film (featuring the actual trumpet performances by Harry James) was adapted from a novel that was loosely rooted around the short life of trumpeter Bix Beiderbecke. While performing with a band in Apartheid South Africa in the mid-‘50s, Hugh Masekela received a trumpet gifted to the Huddleston Jazz Band’s leader (run by Archbishop Trevor Huddleston) from perhaps the world’s best known musician, Louis Armstrong. So you know, he kept that instrument in his closet for years, but donated it to the South Africa’s National Museum for safe-keeping. Masekela received a scholarship for his trumpet virtuosity at the Royal Academy of Music in London, England, later in the decade. Then, he obtained another four-year scholarship to the Manhattan School of Music in New York City with the help of people like Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba. He later married her before she had the hit (No. 12 Pop) in America called “Pata Pata.” Here’s his ex-wife’s major American hit done on a live TV show.

Masekela and Makeba later divorced after two years of wedlock. She later married Black-Power activist Stokeley Carmichael; with that union lasting 10 years. Makeba died of a heart attack at age 76 in November, 2008. The now 76 year-old Hugh Masekela still occasionally performs as of this writing.  

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

AUGUST 3, 1968

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

 

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

THE BEAT OF THE BRASS 

HERB ALPERT & THE TIJUANA BRASS 

 

A&M RECORDS8815

Produced by: Herb Alpert & Jerry Moss


In just six years, the act known as Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass had recorded 10 albums, including the one that contained the act’s only No. 1 Pop hit; “This Guy’s In Love With You.” A TV special called The Beat Of The Brass had aired on CBS Television on April 22, 1968. The surprise success of the vocal track by Herb surprised everyone; including Alpert himself. But it wasn’t the only single released from an album of the same name. Two days prior to the TV special, A&M released an instrumental that was the title song from the Broadway musical starring Jill Haworth, called “Cabaret.” Here’s the song that followed the usual tactics of the Tijuana Brass sound. If you like Middle-of-the-Road music from the late ‘60s, you’re gonna plotz over this one.

         

I told you it was a bit hokey. But at the time, “Cabaret” was on the biggest album in America. As a single, “Cabaret” only attained the No. 72 slot on the Hot 100. The B side “Slick,” bubbled-under the Hot 100 at No. 119—not exactly one to phone home about. But the follow-up was a huge No. 1 in the summer of ’68. (*See above.) The same team that wrote and produced “Cabaret” and “This Guy’s In Love With You” tried again with another vocal from Alpert called “To Wait For Love.” Turn town your speakers really low for this one, as it may hurt your ears.

“To Wait For Love” was not featured on the LP The Beat Of The Brass; mercifully. But it was on a 1969 LP called Warm. Somehow, “To Wait For Love” reached No. 2 on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles chart. Eeek.

 

BEST SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

ARETHA NOW

ARETHA FRANKLIN 

 ATLANTIC RECORDS – 8186

Produced by: Jerry Wexler
Arranged by: Tom Dowd and Arif Mardin 


Released on Flag Day in 1968, the right-rockin,’ good-lookin,’ good-cookin’ Sista Re was enjoying her royalty as the Queen of Soul on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues LPs chart this week in ’68 with her fourth Atlantic Records album, Aretha Now. While sitting at the throne of that chart, the LP was currently No. 5 (its peak slot) on the Pop Top LPs list. The album was in the second of an eventual 17 non-consecutive weeks at No. 1 on the R&B LP chart. Highlights from this album were “Think,” (that reached No. 1 on the R&B singles chart for three weeks and a million-selling single) “I Say A Little Prayer” (No. 10 Pop) and the Steve Cropper and the Don Covay-penned song (No. 14 and a million-seller later in ‘68) “See Saw.” The B side of “Think” was a remake of Sam Cooke’s “You Send Me” and was minor hit on its own. Oddly, Aretha Franklin’s current A side, “The House That Jack Built” (No. 6 Pop and a million-seller) was NOT on this LP. But your Biggest Jay will feature both sides of what I think is the 3rd best single Aretha ever released. If you write to me at BigJaySorensen@gmail.com, we can debate what the TWO best singles were from Soul’s leading lady. First, here’s the original A side of the 45 RPPM, “The House That Jack Built.”

“The House That Jack Built” (with Jack now being a dirty word around my radio home, CBS-FM 101.1) was a great track. But Aretha’s version of “I Say A Little Prayer” (on the B side) became her biggest hit in the U.K. at the time, and outdid the A side in the U.S.A.; not by chart position (“I Say A Little Prayer” got to No. 10 Pop) but by the fact that it was the million-selling side.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtBbyglq37E

Another fact; the British music publication New Musical Express gave the Queen of Soul’s adaptation of the Bacharach & David song the No. 1 position by their critics as the TOP single out of 150 reviewed up to that date in 1987! That’s BIG. The album Aretha Now was executive produced by Jerry Wexler who championed Lady Soul’s newfound success by letting her write and find material more suited to her talents. The vocal group the Sweet Inspirations sang backing vocals on the entire set of released hit singles from the Aretha Now and the A side of the 45 RPM “The House That Jack Built.” And special mention must go to the drummer on all of the LP’s tracks, Roger Hawkins; part of the famed Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section. It didn’t hurt that the incredible skill of engineer Tom Dowd and superb arrangements by Arif Mardin stand the test of time on this album.

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

JULY 27, 1974

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 23) “CALL ON ME

(Lee Loughnane)                                                 

Produced by: James William Guercio

Brass Arrangement by: James Pankow 

Mixed by: Phil Ramone

CHICAGO
COLUMBIA46062

***************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 19) “PLEASE COME TO BOSTON”

(Dave Loggins)                                                    
Produced by: Jerry Crutchfield                         
Arranged by: Glen Spreen

DAVE LOGGINS EPIC11115

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 6) “ROCK THE BOAT”  

(Wally Holmes) 
Produced by: John Florez
Arranged by: Thomas Sellers  

THE HUES CORPORATION
RCA VICTOR 40715

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 9) “THE AIR THAT I BREATHE”

(Albert Hammond / Mike Hazlewood)                   Produced by: Ron Richards & the Hollies               Arranged by: Chris Gunning                                       Engineered by: Alan Parsons  

THE HOLLIES
EPIC
11110

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 16) “FEEL LIKE MAKIN’ LOVE”

(Eugene McDaniels)
Produced by: Rubina Flake (Roberta Flack)
Executive Produced: Joel Dorn
Co-Produced by: L. Leon Pendarvis, Eugene McDaniels, & Louise Fleming
Arranged by: L. Leon Pendarvis & Rubina Flake    
Background vocals: Rubina Flake & Rhetta Hughes             

ROBERTA FLACK
ATLANTIC3025

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 7) “RIKKI DON’T LOSE THAT NUMBER”

(Walter Becker / Donald Fagen)
Produced by: Gary Katz                                      

STEELY DAN
ABC 11439

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 1) “ROCK YOUR BABY”

(Harry Wayne Casey / Richard Finch)
Produced by: Harry Wayne Casey & Richard Finch
Arranged by: Harry Wayne Casey & Richard Finch

GEORGE McCRAE
T.K.1004

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “ROCK AND ROLL HEAVEN”

(Alan O’Day / John Stephenson)
 Produced by: Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter
Arranged by: Michael Omartian

THE RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS
HAVEN / CAPITOL7002

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 4) “DON’T LET THE SUN GO DOWN ON ME”

(Elton John / Bernie Taupin)
Produced by: Gus Dudgeon
Arranged by: (Horns) Del Newman
Arranged by: (Voices) Bruce Johnston
Backing Vocals: Billy Hinsche, Bruce Johnson, Carl Wilson & Toni Tennille

ELTON JOHN MCA50910

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“ANNIE’S SONG”

 

 (John Denver)             

 

Flip-Side:

“COOL AN’ GREEN AN’ SHADY”

 

JOHN DENVER

 

RCA VICTOR RECORDS0295

 

 

Produced by: Milton Okun Assistant Producer: Kris O’Conner

Arranged and Conducted by:         Lee Holdridge

 

 

It’s not a bad way to make a living when you can write a song for your wife while on a ski lift and you end up having a million-seller and the biggest chart hit of a long and storied career. Annie was the first wife of John Denver (real name John Deutschendorf) and he had the No. 1 hit on the Hot 100 this week in ’74 with “Annie’s Song.” Some people know the song as “You Fill Up My Senses” which should have been the sub-title of the song in my opinion. This was the first of two survey-cycles as the leader of the Pop list; and “Annie’s Song” had been the top record on the Easy Listening Singles chart the previous three weeks. The record belatedly climbed the Hot Country Singles chart; eventually reaching No. 9—making Denver a truly potent cross-over artist. Not bad for a folky! Taken from the album Back Home Again (reaching No. 1 in another two weeks) also the title of the million-selling follow-up single to this week’s No. 1 45 RPM; “Annie’s Song” is a love song through and through. The former Annie Martell and Denver were married from 1967 through 1983. Rather than get into the tabloid version of the John Denver saga, I’m more inclined to talk about his music. “Annie’s Song” was the follow-up to another No. 1 song, “Sunshine On My Shoulders” which established Denver as a bona-fide superstar as a folky-space-cadet.

Taken from the album Back Home Again also the title of the million-selling follow-up single to this week’s No. 1 45 RPM) “Annie’s Song” was written out of desperation about the possible break-up of his marriage. He penned the words about how he loved his wife after she phoned him to tell him she loved him while he was away from her in Switzerland. Sometimes things don’t work out, as their marriage did end up failing. Denver was a mainstay on the concert circuit and TV for many years, with his life ending as a result of his light aircraft crashing along the coast of California in 2005. 

 

TOP 50 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74

No.1

MIDDLE-of-the-ROAD

(Easy Listening)

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“YOU AND ME AGAINST THE WORLD”

(Paul Williams / Kenny Ascher)

                                                                                      

Flip-Side:

“LOVE SONG FOR JEFFREY”

 

HELEN REDDY

 

CAPITOL RECORDS3807

 

Produced by: Tom Catalano

Arranged and Conducted by: Artie Butler

 

It’s kind of endearing to hear a child recorded speaking or singing on a hit record. It can also wear out its welcome fairly quickly as far as I’m concerned. But this was Ms. Nice, “I Am Woman” Helen Reddy; and she used her daughter Tracy (which happens to be the name of our daughter) in the song to help make it even more saccharine. “You And Me Against The World” was in the pinnacle position of the Top 50 Easy Listening Singles special survey this week in ’74.  It was also heading for an ultimate No. 9 spot on the Hot 100; this week in the No. 31 slot and moving up. It was the second single from the album Song For Jeffrey, and was the follow-up to her No. 15 Pop 45 RPM, “Keep On Singing.”

Next week’s issue of Billboard Magazine devoted many pages to the success of Helen Reddy, with accolades coming from all corners of the music world. The so-called “Queen of ‘70s Pop,” Helen Maxine Lamond Reddy was ready for prime-time by this point. She briefly had her own summer-replacement TV variety show and appeared on all of the late-night chat-fests during this era. Reddy also showed up in some motion-pictures including Pete’s Dragon, Airport ’75 and the flop film, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. She was able to have some Country-crossover hits during this time including her quirky “Leave Me Alone (Ruby Red Dress)” (a song she despises to this day and will not perform) still on the Hot Country Singles listing. Her next hit was to be her last No. 1 Pop record, “Angie Baby,” yet another quirky female-be-strange recording. She was the first Australian to win a Grammy® and won recognition at the very first American Music Awards as the Favorite Pop/Rock Female Artist if you can believe that. Migrating to America in the mid-‘60s, her first hit was “I Don’t Know How To Love Him” (No. 13 Pop) that won the cover-version war with Yvonne Elliman’s (No. 28 Pop) soundtrack version (as Mary Magdalene) from the rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar in late ’70 into early ‘71. But by the end of the decade, the wind went out of Reddy’s native-Australian sails of her very productive ‘70s; and she totally walked away from the music biz at the beginning of the new millennium. She claimed then she would never return. But never say never, as she did come back after an over a decade sabbatical and her third divorce; saying she missed performing as she entered her seventies. During that time off, she got a degree in clinical hypnotherapy and sings only the songs she wants these days. In all, Helen Reddy had 15 Top 40 Pop Hits and is a naturalized American citizen, allowing her to continue to keep her Australian and American ties.   

 

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“MY THANG Pt. 1”

(James Brown)

 

Flip-Side:

“PUBLIC ENEMY #1 Pt. 1”

 

JAMES BROWN – Minister of New Super Heavy Funk

POLYDOR RECORDS14244

Produced by: James Brown

Arranged by: Fred Wesley

Engineer: Bob Both

 

It was the second and final survey-period at the throne of the Hot Soul Singles listing for the Godfather of Soul; now calling himself the Minister of New Super Heavy Funk with “My Thang” Pt. 1” on Polydor Records. Brown had left King records in the early ‘70s; briefly on People Records in ’71, while he searched for more control of his brand. This was Brown’s next to last No. 1 song on the R&B charts. His final prime single was the follow-up to this week’s chart-topping 45 RPM, the very political “Funky President (People It’s Bad).” “My Thang” sprang from the nearly 70 minutes of music double album called simply Hell. This is FUNKY hell with an on-fire band the J.B.’s.

Oddly, on the single, it said the song was called “My Thang Pt. 1” when there was no Part 2 found anywhere; not even a longer version of the single on the album Hell! It could have been an anomaly, but that’s what makes record collecting so interesting. While James Brown continued to have a few more mostly R&B charting hits, his days of also hitting the Hot 100 were winding down by this time in ’74. Of course, he was revered, but current trends were passing him by. Brown did have a comeback with the 45 RPM “Living In America” that won him a Grammy® for R&B Male Vocal in 1985 with the theme from Rocky IV starring Sylvester Stallone. JB died of heart failure in 2006 at age 73.

 

 

 THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JULY 27, 1974

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

 

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

CARIBOU

ELTON JOHN

MCA RECORDS2116

 

Produced by: Gus Dudgeon


It wasn’t like Elton John needed any further star power on anything he was recording at the time, but he added it anyway on the LP recorded in the Rocky Mountains at the Caribou Ranch in Nederland, Colorado. Performers in guest roles included: singer Dusty Springfield, the Tower Of Power horn section on “The Bitch Is Back” (the album’s opening track and a future No. 4 Pop hit) as well as the angelic voices of Carl Wilson, Bruce Johnston (Beach Boys) along with Billy Hinsche (Dino, Desi & Billy) and none other than Toni Tennille on this week’s No. 2 Pop single, “Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me.” The nearest timeframe for a video of that song from this era was recorded in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1976.

Of course, the song was resurrected in late ’91 into early ’92 with George Michael inviting Sir Elton onto the stage on his 45th birthday at a concert in London in March of ‘91; later becoming a No. 1 record on both the Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary charts. For the original on this week’s No. 1 LP Caribou, lyricist Bernie Taupin said he and Elton wanted to put together a “BIG” song along the lines of “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling” from the Righteous Brothers; perhaps the crowning moment for producer Phil Spector in the ‘60s. An aside to the guest vocalists on the track mentioned above; reportedly, there were originally even more stars singing on the track, including: the trio of singers from Three Dog Night, the (then) trio America, along with Dusty Springfield. However; Gus Dudgeon decided it was too cluttered, so they left out their tracks completely on the final mix. Also, Elton wasn’t satisfied with HIS vocal and almost scrapped the entire song at one point. Thankfully, they managed to finish the song so it could become yet another million-selling single. “Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me” was nominated, but did not win a Grammy® for Album of the Year or Best Pop Vocal Performance – Male. Elton’s holiday recording, “Step Into Christmas” was recorded during the sessions for Caribou, but wasn’t included on the album. For a hoot, how about let’s have a bit of a “Christmas in July” with that song!


Elton’s musicians on the session included: Davey Johnstone on guitar, Dee Murray on bass (he died in 1992) Nigel Olsson on drums and Ray Cooper on percussion. A select few other musicians performed on the LP. The studio itself (named Caribou Ranch) had quite a history. James William Guercio, who is the Grammy® -winning producer of acts like Chicago, Blood, Sweat & Tears, the Buckinghams and more, opened the isolated mountain retreat elevated in the Rockies near Boulder, Colorado outside the little municipality called Nederland in 1971 as a state-of-the-art recording facility. It ultimately stretched to 4,000 acres sprinkled with lavish cabins that housed the principal names in rock music, including: Billy Joel, Dan Fogelberg, the Beach Boys, Rod Stewart, Chicago, Eddie Rabbit, Joe Walsh, Carole King and many more. It had to be shuttered 14 years later when a March 1985 fire ruined the engineering control room.   

 

SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘74:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

SKIN TIGHT

OHIO PLAYERS

 

 MERCURY RECORDS1-705

 

Produced by: Ohio Players: Clarence Satchel, Leroy “Sugarfoot” Bonner, William “Billy” Beck, Marvin “Merv” Pierce, Ralph “Pee Wee” Middlebrook, Marshall Jones, James “Diamond” Williams 

Ohio Players held the top slot this week in ’74 on the Soul LP’s chart with the album Skin Tight on Mercury Records. This was the second of an eventual six back-to-back survey-periods as the premier R&B album in the land. It peaked at No. 11 on the Pop Top LPs and Tape listing. It was currently sitting in the No. 27 position and rising on that Pop chronicle of albums. The first single from the LP was “Jive Turkey Pt. 1,” sliding down to No. 27 after peaking at No. 6 several weeks ago on the Hot Soul Singles special survey. Here’s the LP version.

However, it was their breakthrough Pop hit, “Skin Tight” that put the Dayton, Ohio ensemble in the mainstream. That second single from the album was funk with a touch of “Big Band, Jazz and (gulp) even Disco! Here’s the album version from your Big Jay, reaching the Hot 100 for the week ending on September 7, 1974.  

“Skin Tight” set us up for Ohio Players’ biggest hit released later in the year; “Fire.” Ohio Players was a major act for a few years in the mid-‘70s, with their blend of Funk and Soul music. Ohio Players paid their dues long before most people knew who they were. The band played instrumentals for the R&B vocal group the Falcons and Band (“I Found A Love” with Wilson Pickett as the lead singer) in 1962, using the name the Ohio Untouchables. Confusion with another band over that moniker led the seven man ensemble to change it to Ohio Players and they started having hits in ’71. Their first national big hit single and first million-selling record happened in ’73 with “Funky Worm” on the Westbound Records label; their first Hot Soul Singles No. 1 45 RPM. The group would end up with four million-selling hits; including their last in 1975, “Love Rollercoaster” (another No. 1 Pop hit) and one more No. 1 Hot Soul Singles hit, “Who’d She Coo?” all on Mercury Records. The main original hit-making members of the group included: Leroy “Sugarfoot” Bonner on guitar and percussion, William “Billy” Beck on keyboards, James “Diamond” Williams on drums, Marvin “Marv” Pierce on trumpet, flugelhorn and valve trombone, Marshall Jones on bass, Clarence “Satch” Satchell baritone, tenor sax, flute and percussion, Ralph “Pee-Wee” Middlebrooks on trumpet and trombone. Notably, the group featured scantily clad (if any clothing at all) models on their outside and inside LP covers in provocative poses. On this album, there was a rather lascivious image of a naked woman, likely consummating the…sale of the LP for many men; yes, even me. Ohio Players continued to have chart-hits until ’77. Satchell the lead vocalist died in 1995 and Bonner passed in 2013. Remaining members of the group still perform occasionally.

 


 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

AUGUST 2, 1986

 


HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘86:

 

 


 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 11) “OPPORTUNITIES” (Let’s Make Lots Of Money)”

(Neil Tennant / Chris Lowe)
Original Production by: J. J. Jeczalik & Nicholas Froome -- Additional Production for U.S. 45 RPM: Stephen Hague 
New York Overdubs Produced by: Ron Dean Miller  Re-mix and additional Production by: Shep Pettibone         

PET SHOP BOYS
EMI AMERICA8321 later 8330 with different B side

***************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 12) “WE DON’T HAVE TO TAKE OUR CLOTHES OFF”

(Preston Glass / Narada Michael Walden)
Produced by: Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions
Arranged by: Narada Michael Walden

JERMAINE STEWART
ARISTA9424

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 4) “NASTY”  

(James Harris III / Terry Lewis / Janet Jackson) 
Produced by: Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis for Flyte Time Productions – Co-Producer: Janet Jackson
Executive Producer: John McLain
Rhythm & Vocals Arranged by: Jimmy Jam, Terry Lewis & Janet Jackson                

JANET JACKSON
A&M2830

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 7) “LOVE TOUCH” 
(Theme from LEGAL EAGLES)  

(Michael Chapman / Holly Knight / Gene Black)
Produced by: Michael Chapman

ROD STEWART
WARNER BROS. 86687

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 8) “MAD ABOUT YOU”
(Paula Brown / James Whelan / Mitchell Evans)
Produced by: Michael Lloyd for Mike Curb Productions 
Remixed and Engineered by: William Orbit        

BELINDA CARLISLE
I.R.S.52815

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 3) “INVISIBLE TOUCH” 

(Anthony Banks / Phil Collins / Mike Rutherford) 
Produced by: Genesis & Hugh Padgham – Produced by: Anthony Banks, Ltd., Philip Collins, Ltd., & Michael Rutherford, Ltd. / Hit & Run Music

GENESIS ATLANTIC 89407

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 6) PAPA DON’T PREACH” 

(Brian Elliott – Additional Lyrics by Madonna)
Produced by: Madonna and Steven Bray                 

MADONNA
SIRE 28660

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 2) “DANGER ZONE”

(Giorgio Moroder / Tom Whitlock)
Produced by: Giorgio Moroder

KENNY LOGGINS
COLUMBIA05893

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 1) “SLEDGEHAMMER”

(Peter Gabriel)
Produced by: Daniel Lanois and Peter Gabriel         
Engineered by: Kevin Killen                  

PETER GABRIEL
GEFFEN28718

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 5)

 

“GLORY OF LOVE”
(Theme from KARATE KID PART II)

 (Peter Cetera / David Foster / Diane Nini)

 

Flip-Side

“ON THE LINE”

  

PETER CETERA 

FULL MOON / WARNER BROS. RECORDS28662

Produced by: Michael Omartian

 

 

Peter Cetera had become the voice of Chicago for many of their hits from the beginning of their recorded output, through the album Chicago 17; one of their biggest sellers. Even before he was asked to leave the successful ensemble, Peter Cetera had embarked on a solo career with a self-titled album. It stiffed. But it was after he was persona non grata with the band that he had his first No. 1 solo hit song called “Glory Of Love”, co-written by Cetera, his then wife Diane Nini and renowned composer/arranger David Foster who also had worked with Chicago. “Glory Of Love” was also the stand-out and lead-off track from the Karate Kid Part II soundtrack.

This was the first of two back-to-back weeks as the prime 45 RPM in the U.S.A., and third of five survey-cycles as the biggest record on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles listing. (**See below.) With his old band Chicago, Peter Cetera had two other No. 1 singles; “If You Leave Me Now” from ’76 and “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” from Chicago 16 in ‘82. “Glory Of Love” was the fifth No. 1 Pop hit for producer Michael Omartian. His first was “Rock Me Gently” by Andy Kim, “Theme From SWAT” by Rhythm Heritage, “Undercover Angel” from Alan O’Day and “Sailing” by Christopher Cross. Not a bad pedigree. “Glory Of Love” was also the third No. 1 45 RPM A side that David Foster had co-written, following “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” from Chicago and “St. Elmo’s Fire (Man In Motion).” Persistent rumors continue about Cetera perhaps returning to Chicago, but the remaining members of the long-running group don’t seem to be eager to have him rejoin the multi-million selling band, especially in light of the fact that Peter claims he doesn’t wish to tour due to Chicago’s consistently heavy road schedule each year.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘86

 

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

“GLORY OF LOVE”
(Theme from KARATE KID PART II)

 (Peter Cetera / David Foster /        Diane Nini)

 

Flip-Side

“ON THE LINE”

 

PETER CETERA

 

FULL MOON / WARNER BROS. RECORDS28662

 

Produced by: Michael Omartian 

This was the third of an ultimate five consecutive weeks at the crest of the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart for “Glory Of Love” from Peter Cetera. (**See above.) You may remember that the next single from Cetera was “Next Time I Fall” with Cetera joined by Amy Grant featured here. “Next Time I Fall In Love” was also a No. 1 song on the Hot 100 singles chart for one week in December of ’86, and reigned for two weeks at the peak of the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks listing in November of ’86. Both No. 1 songs were taken from the Cetera LP Solitude/Solitaire.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘88

 

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“CLOSER THAN CLOSE” 

(Terry Price)

 

Flip-Side

“LUCKY CHARM”

JEAN CARNE

OMNI RECORDS – 99531  

Produced by: Grover Washington, Jr. 

How do you describe an artist that is proficient as a classically trained musician, one that has played with some of the biggest names in Jazz, Soul, R&B and can sing Standards? You call her Jean Carne. Who’s she?  Jean Carne was the prime performer on the Hot Black Singles chart this week in ’86 with a record that didn’t even reach the Pop Hot 100 chart; “Closer Than Close” on the Omni Records label. Jean Carne’s real name is Sarah Jean Perkins. She was born and raised in Georgia. At a young age, she sang with Duke Ellington’s Orchestra, sang with pianist Errol Garner, backed-up Norman Connors, George Duke and even Earth, Wind & Fire on recordings. Carne had a couple of minor hits on her own on the Philadelphia International Records roster with instrumental backing from MFSB (the label’s house band) and the group Instant Funk in the mid-‘70s. She then got signed to the Motown labels in the early ‘80s and even had the Temptations back her up vocally. She then hooked up with the Atlantic Records subsidiary label Omni Records, and was produced by celebrated sax player Grover Washington, Jr. The result was this week’s No. 1 Soul hit, “Closer Than Close.”


“Closer Than Close” was in the first of a two-week run at the apex of this chart. The scorching “Quiet Storm” song showed the full supremacy of her voice along with the unfailingly smooth alto sax of Grover Washington, Jr. In 2008, Carne was a featured performer on the PBS two-part TV special called Love Train: The Sound Of Philadelphia; a tribute to legendary producers/writers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. The following year, one of Carne’s recordings, “Was That All It Was” was used in the movie Precious, produced by Tyler Perry and Oprah Winfrey. Carne continues to perform and record.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week ENDING

AUGUST 2, 1986

TOP POP

ALBUMS 

  

THIS WEEK IN ‘86:

 

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

TOP GUN
Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

VARIOUS ARTISTS

COLUMBIA RECORDS40323 

Executive Producer: Don Simpson
Executive Producer: Jerry Bruckheimer
 

The Tom Cruise-starring film Top Gun was a huge success in ’86, and the Top Gun Original Motion Picture Soundtrack was the biggest album in the land during this, the second of an eventual five non-consecutive weeks on Columbia Records. At the start, it was intended that the group Toto would perform the track “Danger Zone.” Contract issues between the movie’s producers and Toto’s legal team prevented that from happening. It’s been reported that Toto was also supposed to have the “Love Theme” from the film as well, and had even gone so far as to write their own tune, but that too got squelched in the legal morass. Canadian singer/songwriter Bryan Adams was also approached to sing “Danger Zone” and one of his own songs for the soundtrack, but that too was scuttled. And even REO Speedwagon was approached to record it, and they begged-off as they were told they couldn’t do one of their OWN songs for the soundtrack. However, Kenny Loggins didn’t seem to have any issues with recording the main song from Top Gun, written by the musical producer Giorgio Moroder and lyricist/scorer Tom Whitlock. That’s guitarist Dan Huff from the group Giant playing the searing licks on “Danger Zone.”

“Danger Zone” reached No. 2 on the Hot 100 Singles chart for just a sole week, for the survey-period ending July 26th of ’86. Loggins would have another track released as a single from the soundtrack called “Playing With The Boys,” produced by Peter Wolf; but that stiffed at No. 60 in the early autumn of ’86 on the Hot 100. But there was another song rapidly climbing the singles chart that also drove album sales for the soundtrack. Berlin’s “Take My Breath Away (Love Theme From Top Gun)” was poised to be the No. 1 song on the Hot 100 for the week ending September 13th for just one list-period. It was screaming up the Hot 100 this week at No. 23 after just seven weeks on the listing. And, in another twist, Berlin was actually the very first act to be asked to sing both “Danger Zone” AND “Take My Breath Away (Love Theme From Top Gun,)” but the group liked the latter song better and opted out of the first track. It was Whitlock who wrote the lyrics to “Take My Breath Away (Love Them From Top Gun)” as he was also scoring the incidental music to the film.

That was the voice of Terri Nunn, an actress and singer on the “Love Theme” from Top Gun; a member of the group Berlin that was based in L.A. They found having a No. 1 Pop song to be an albatross around their necks, as they were generally known as a Hard-Rock act. Having a ballad played on your mother’s soft-rock station was not good for their career in the long run; as the group never had another Top 50 hit on their own label Geffen Records. The song “Take My Breath Away (Love Theme From Top Gun)” will live forever, as it was awarded the Oscar® for Best Original Song (the statue going to Moroder and Whitlock) and also a Golden Globe® Award for Best Original Song. The soundtrack also featured another track from Loggins, and cuts from Cheap Trick, Teena Marie, Loverboy, Miami Sound Machine and Harold Faltermeyer & Steve Stevens with instrumental “Top Gun Anthem.”

 

TOP BLACK ALBUMS

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘86:

 

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

WINNER IN YOU

PATTI LABELLE

MCA RECORDS5737

 

Production Supervised by: James R. “Budd” Ellison
Executive Producer: Patti Labelle

Last season’s Dancing With The Stars participant Patti Labelle’s LP Winner In You was sitting at the helm of the Hot Black Albums chart, during this the last of eight back-to-back seven-day survey-sequences at No. 1 this week in 1986. It had spent a sole week atop the Top Pop Albums listing for the week ending on July 19th. The album was currently in the No. 7 slot on the Pop LP register. The single “On My Own” on MCA Records was at the zenith of the Pop Singles chart for three weeks, beginning with the week ending on June 14, 1986 (currently having slid down to No. 49 after 20 of its eventual 23 weeks on that list; and had been No. 1 on the Hot Black Singles chart for four survey-periods, starting with the week ending on May 17th and was a No. 2 hit on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart a few weeks back; currently at No. 22 after 17 weeks on that list. All of this was helped by the vocal clout of the by then very familiar voice of Michael McDonald. This was a true superstar recording if you include the fact that it was written and produced by none other than Burt Bacharach along with Carole Bayer Sager—who were married at the time—divorced in 1991. The Bacharach association was a bit odd, as his protégé Dionne Warwick was supposed to have included a version on her album Friends, but was left off the final release. Warwick’s loss was LaBelle’s gain, as it ended up being the largest single of her career. “On My Own” was produced, written and arranged by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager. Much of the rest of her album Winner In You was produced by Richard Perry (Perry allowed Bacharach and Sayer to produce the main track after they thought it needed something Perry wasn’t providing.) Patti was functioning with the cream of the crop with all concerned. Adding to that, she had top names such as Peter Wolf, (of J. Geils Band) songwriter/producer/performer David Foster and Bacharach himself playing instruments on the track. The backing singers included: Maxine Willard Waters and her sister Julia Tillman Waters (who sang AS the Supremes on “Someday We’ll Be Together” way back in 1969; replacing the two real Supremes for Diana Ross’ farewell song. Originally, McDonald agreed to sing on the song only if it was not going to be a single. His record label was apprehensive at first after he had gone back into the studio to embellish what was initially a small cameo role, but eventually agreed to allow the final product. Bacharach and Sayer insisted that it be a duet AND a single — so Michael recorded more vocals in a different studio without LaBelle in attendance. The result was “On My Own” as we know it today. Even the video for the song was made with the duo being 3,000 miles apart.

Labelle and McDonald met for the first time on set of The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson in Burbank, California at the NBC Studios when they performed “On My Own.” There was a follow-up single without McDonald from Labelle’s LP; the song “Oh People.”

That anthem-like song, “Oh People,” the Winner In You album’s pleasing opening track (pleading for a better world) just reached No. 29 on the Hot 100; and yet managed to hit No. 7 on the Hot Black Singles chart after its release as a single on June 30, 1986. 


**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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