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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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July 3rd, 2015

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

JULY 8, 1967

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 13) “THE TRACKS OF MY TEARS’”

(William Robinson / Marvin Tarplin / Warren Moore)    Produced by: Lou Adler

JOHNNY RIVERS IMPERIAL66244

*************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 2) “GROOVIN’”

(Felix Cavaliere / Eddie Brigatti)                       
Produced by: The Young Rascals

THE YOUNG RASCALS ATLANTIC2401

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 8) “LET’S LIVE FOR TODAY”  

(Ivan Mogul / Shel Shapiro / Michael Julien    
Produced by: Steve Barri / P. F. Sloan

THE GRASS ROOTS DUNHILL 4084

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 12) “UP UP AND AWAY  

(Jim Webb)                                                           
Produced by: Johnny Rivers and Marc Gordon        Strings & Horns Arranged by: Marty Paich

THE 5th DIMENSION SOUL CITY756   

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 9) “COME ON DOWN TO MY BOAT”

(Wes Farrell / Jerry Goldstein)                              Produced by: Wes Farrell

EVERY MOTHERS’ SON MGM13733

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 10) “DON’T SLEEP IN THE SUBWAY” 

(Jackie Trent / Tony Hatch)                              
Produced & Arranged by: Tony Hatch
                                                         

DUSTY SPRINGFIELD WARNER BROS.7049

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “SAN FRANCISCO (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair)” 

(John Phillips)                                                      
Produced by: Lou Adler & John Phillips

                                                                                          

SCOTT McKENZIE ODE103

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 7) “CAN’T TAKE MY EYES OFF YOU”

(Bob Crewe / Bob Gaudio)  
Produced by: Bob Crewe                                  
Arranged by: Artie Schroek & Bob Gaudio

FRANKIE VALLI PHILIPS40446

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 3) “A LITTLE BIT O’ SOUL”

(John Carter / Ken Lewis)                                                                                      Produced by: Jeff Katz, Jerry Kasenetz and Elliot Chiprut

THE MUSIC EXPLOSION LAURIE 3380

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“WINDY”

 (Ruthann Friedman)

Produced by: Bones Howe

 

Flip-Side:

“SOMETIME”

THE ASSOCIATION®

WARNER BROS. RECORDS7041


 

This week in ’67, a strong summer breeze blew in “Windy” as the No. 1 Hot 100 single in America by the amalgamation called the Association®. It was the second of four back-to-back survey-periods at the pinnacle of the Pop list. The group from L.A. had the distinction of being the first group on-stage at the first big rock festival in the U.S.; the Monterey Pop Festival, introduced by the festival’s co-founder John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas at the Monterey County Fairgrounds in California on June 16, 1967. They performed three songs that day: “Enter The Young,” “Along Comes Mary” and this week’s chart-topping single, “Windy.” The song was written by Ruthann Friedman, who also sang on the chorus at the end of the song, after co-lead singers Russ Giguere and Larry Ramos’ vocals needed a boost after a literal all-night recording session. “Windy” songwriter Ruthann Friedman, a Bronx-native but a “Hippy-Migration” (as she puts it) brought her to California where she was introduced to the Association® by songwriter Van Dyke Parks. Hawaiian-native Ramos was then new to the Association® for their current album Inside Out. He was the replacement voice for co-founder of the vocal group, Gary Jules Alexander; who later returned to the ensemble in ’69 after learning a meditational way of life in the Himalayas. Here’s the group performing their hit “Windy” live at the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park, Illinois during the “Summer of Love.”

Originally a 12-man group called the Men, some of the members decided to cut it down to six guys and landed on the name the Association®. They first scored with “Along Comes Mary” the slightly controversial song that some thought was about marijuana. Their second single and the only other No. 1 song they had was “Cherish”—both on the Valiant Records imprint. That company was bought-out by Warner Bros. Records after their next two singles stiffed. Their third LP (by then on Warner Bros. called Inside Out, featured both the million-selling “Windy” and the nearly perfect follow-up single, “Never My Love,” reaching No. 2 on the Hot 100 Singles listing; and more importantly, reportedly the second most-performed song on American radio and television in the 20th Century according to BMI (Broadcast Music Inc.) in America. That song was written by Donald and Richard Addrisi of the act called the Addrisi Brother. They had a couple of Top 40 hits as a recording act, including: “We’ve Got To Get It On Again” (No. 25 Pop) in ’72 and “Slow Dancin’ Don’t Turn Me On” (No. 20 Pop) in ’77. Richard Addrisi died in 1984. They had been discovered by comedian Lenny Bruce. The Association had a few more hits after “Never My Love” including: “Everything That Touches You” written by co-founder Terry Kirkman (No. 10 Pop in ’68) “Time For Livin’” (No. 39 Pop) “Six Man Band” (No. 47) and their final Hot 100 hit of the ‘60s, “Goodbye Columbus” (No. 80 Pop) the title song from the film Goodbye Columbus, starring Richard Benjamin. The Association® (two members of the classic period of the group in tow, Gary Jules Alexander and Jim Yester) are a part of the “Happy Together Tour” that will play several dates in New Jersey in the coming weeks. Larry Ramos passed away in 2014, Brian Cole died at the young age 29 in ’72. Larry’s brother Del and Brian’s son Jordan now perform with the touring outfit.

 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

MIDDLE-ROAD

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“MARY IN THE MORNING”

 

(Johnny Cymbal / Mike Lendell (Rashkow)

Produced by: Tom Morgan & Marvin Holtzman

Conducted by: Pete De Angelis

 

Flip-Side:

“I LOVE YOU AND YOU LOVE ME”

CAPITOL RECORDS5904 

Your Big Jay happened to have known both guys who wrote this monster Middle-of-the-Road” hit called “Mary In The Morning,” sung by Al Martino; the biggest hit on the Top 40 Easy Listening special survey this week in ’67. Johnny Cymbal was known for his 1963 hit, “Mr. Bass Man” (No. 16 Pop) and later, known as Derek with the suggestive song “Cinnamon”—remember the lyric, “Let me innn” (No. 11 Pop) in late 1968. Once a professional golfer in the early to mid-‘60s, and later a collaborator with songwriter/producer Ellie Greenwich, (Rashkow) Mike Lendell (as he was known professionally as a songwriter) was later an associate of mine who worked in sales for a brief time at a local radio station at the Jersey Shore (WHLW-AM 11/7 Radio) and later had his own production company specializing in advertising and graphic design; concentrating on marketing the horse racing industry. Both Cymbal (born John Hendry Blair in Scotland) and Lendell (Rashkow) have gone on to Rock & Roll Heaven. “Mary In The Morning” was not a huge hit on the Hot 100, stalling at No. 27 on that list, but it was a potent hit for lovers of what would later be known as the “Great American Songbook.”

This was the second and concluding chart-cycle for “Mary In The Morning” heading this special survey. It didn’t hurt the coffers of Cymbal and Lendell (Rashkow) as none other than Elvis Presley recorded a remake of “Mary In The Morning” and performed it for years in live shows. Al Martino’s real name was Jasper Cini. He changed it to Al Martino at the suggestion of his South Philadelphia pal and operatic superstar singer, Mario Lanza. You may better know Martino as the singer and character Johnny Fontane in The Godfather flicks.  

 

TOP SELLING

R&B

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 


“RESPECT”

(Otis Redding)

Produced by: Jerry Wexler
Arranged by: Tom Dowd

 

Flip-Side:

“DR. FEELGOOD”

 

ARETHA FRANKLIN

ATLANTIC RECORDS2403

Without a doubt, this single was the Soul Shot heard ‘round the world. This was the last of eight consecutive weeks as the standard-barer of the Top Selling R&B Singles special survey. “Respect” had also been the No. 1 song on the Hot 100 for two survey-periods at the end of May into the second week of June of ’67; yet, it was still smokin’ hot on the R&B list.  

Aretha’s take on the song first made popular by Otis Redding (who stripped the original writing credits from a man named Speedo Simms who gave Redding the original ideas for the song) earned Franklin’s record two Grammy® Awards in 1968 for Best Rhythm & Blues Recording and Best Rhythm & Blues Solo Vocal Performance, Female. “Respect” was later named in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry of America and the National Endowment for the Arts. Give credit to Atlantic Records’ producer Jerry Wexler for suggesting the song to the newly crowned Queen of Soul. “Respect” is subjectively considered one of the Top 10 recordings of the Rock ‘n’ Roll era. With that in mind, I find it amazing that “Respect” was the No. 1 Pop single for ONLY two weeks in ’67 as mentioned above. The single was culled from the current number one R&B LP, I Never Love A Man The Way That I Love You. (**See below.)

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JULY 8, 1967

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

SGT. PEPPER’S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND

THE BEATLES

CAPITOL RECORDS2653

Produced by: George Martin 

This was the summer of the Beatles—not just the summer of love—and nothing would ever be the same. The Fabs released their ground shaking masterpiece; Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band debuting on June 1, 1967 in the U.K. on Parlophone Records, and the next day in the U.S. on Capitol. Four weeks later, after just three weeks on the chart, the album was No. 1 in America, already for its second survey-cycle; yet there were no singles taken from it. Instead, demand for new Beatle product was so high; “Penny Lane” (No 1. Pop & million-seller) and “Strawberry Fields Forever” (No. 8 Pop) were released as a single earlier in the year. Those two sides were originally recorded with the intention of being included on the LP. Much has been written about the then unparalleled money and time it took making the music on the album (as well as the cover art and inserts) and ensuing reaction worldwide. Listening today, there are a few dated sounds within the groove; but it still holds up as one of the most superb recordings of the 20th Century. The track “A Day In The Life” is what is considered by many to be the crowning moment for any rock band in history; combining elements of genius, engineering, production, musicianship and sheer guts.

You have to love that last chord (E major) using Paul, John, Ringo and Mal Evans simultaneously hitting the keys on three separate pianos (one was shared) and George Martin on a harmonium—all of which was said to be overdubbed three times by engineer Geoff Emerick to achieve that gut-crushing 53 final seconds of sound. But wait...there’s more. If you had the U.K. version of Sgt. Pepper, you heard (or tried to hear) a very high-pitched sound that only dogs can hear; followed by Beatles gibberish on the “run-out” groove, so it would theoretically play forever. When you think of the progression of the recorded work by the Beatles, it’s astonishing by today’s standards to measure just how quickly they became implicit masters of their craft. The initial album by the Beatles, Please Please Me, was recorded in early 1963. Just four years later, what most consider their magnum opus—Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band—was put onto audio tape during the later parts of 1966 into the spring of ’67, at a cost that made the suits at EMI Records in London have sleepless nights. But the rewards were worth the insomnia. This week in ’67 the album was in its second of eventual 15 weeks as America’s biggest LP. Historians have well-documented the making of the album with day-by-day chronicles of the recording sessions. The set would not have been possible without the unique combination of instrumental dexterity by the group (Ringo’s perfect drumming included) and other musicians, the writing talent by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, the production of George Martin and technological wizardry of engineers like Emerick; all combining to make Sgt. Pepper almost unquestionably, the album of the decade (perhaps the century) but definitively, THE album of the rock era. I’d love to hear your comments about that. Send them to BigJaySorensen@gmail.com.   

 

TOP SELLING

R&B

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

I NEVER LOVED A MAN 

ARETHA FRANKLIN

 ATLANTIC RECORDS8139

Produced by: Jerry Wexler

Arranged by and Directed by: Tom Dowd

Aretha Franklin signed with Atlantic in late 1966 after a lengthy, but largely fruitless stay at mainstream Columbia Records. This week’s leader the R&B album list became the springboard that launched Franklin into a superstar orbit. The first single reached No. 9 on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart. “I Never Loved A Man (The Way That I Love You)” was written Ronnie Shannon, who also would write a future hit (also a No. 1 R&B smash and Top 4 Pop record) by Aretha called “Baby I Love You.” Aretha’s signature song “Respect” was also on that LP (leading off the set) and was her first of many No. 1 Pop singles. But that song had to be recorded in New York, as Aretha’s then husband Ted White pulled a hissy-fit while his bride was recording what would be the B side of “I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)” at the Muscle Shoals, Alabama FAME Studios; “Do Right Woman, Do Right Man.”

Legend has it that a session musician was looking a tad too lasciviously at the future Queen of Soul, and Ted White had a knock-down fight with the studio cat. That brawl cut short the recording session, with Franklin and partner making tracks for her home in Detroit. Franklin was nowhere to be found according to Jerry Wexler, her producer. They needed Franklin to complete the vocal track on the A side to be able to release the recording on vinyl; which Atlantic thought to be the stronger of the two cuts in the can. This altercation forced the recording of the rest of the LP to move from Alabama to the Atlantic studios here in Gotham. That transport was made with reservations by Wexler, who was expressly looking for the rougher sound and ambience of the Muscle Shoals studio. But Wexler (who wielded a lot of power at the time) shifted most of the same musicians to New York to complete the album I Never Loved A Man, after White and Franklin calmed down about the confrontation and arrived in Manhattan. White later maintained the original conflict was racial in nature; however that was labeled inaccurate by Wexler and others in the studio down in Muscle Shoals. The LP I Never Loved A Man has been heralded as a landmark set of songs.

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

JULY 10, 1971

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘71:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 16) “THAT’S THE WAY I’VE ALWAYS HEARD IT SHOULD BE”

(Carly Simon / Jacob Brackman)                      
Produced by: Eddie Kramer                                    
String Arrangement by: Ed Freeman 

CARLY SIMON ELEKTRA45724

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No. 9 (LW 9) “WHEN YOU’RE HOT, YOU’RE HOT”

(Jerry R. Hubbard)                                               
Produced by: Chet Atkins

JERRY REED RCA VICTOR47-9976

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 6) “WANT ADS”  

(General Johnson / Greg Perry / Barney Perkins)
Produced by: Greg Perry

THE HONEY CONE HOT WAX7011

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 12) “MR. BIG STUFF”

(Joe Broussard / Ralph Williams / Carrol Washington)
Produced and Arranged by: Wardell Quezergue for Malaco Productions

JEAN KNIGHT STAX 0088

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 8) “YOU’VE GOT A FRIEND”

(Carole King)                                                         
Produced by: Peter Asher for Marylebone Productions

JAMES TAYLOR WARNER BROS.7498

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No. 5 (LW 5) “DON’T PULL YOUR LOVE” 

(Dennis Lambert / Brian Potter)                                  
Produced by: Steve Barri                                      
Strings & Horns Arranged by Jimmie Haskell

DUNHILL / ABC 4276

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “RAINY DAYS AND MONDAYS”

(Paul Williams / Roger Nichols)                         
Produced by: Jack Daugherty                           
Arranged and Orchestrated by: Richard Carpenter

CARPENTERS A&M 1260

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “TREAT HER LIKE A LADY”

(Eddie Cornelius)                                                
Produced by: Bob Archibald

CORNELIUS BROTHERS & SISTER ROSE UNITED ARTISTS50721

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 2) “INDIAN RESERVATION (The Lament Of The Cherokee Reservation Indian)”

(John D. Loudermilk)                                        
Produced by: Mark Lindsay

RAIDERS COLUMBIA45332

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“IT’S TOO LATE” 

 (Carole King / Toni Stern)             

Backed With:

“I FEEL THE EARTH MOVE”

(Carole King)                           

CAROLE KING 

ODE RECORDS66015

Produced by: Lou Adler

What a week—no, what a year—for Carole King. During this survey-period in ’71, the songwriter had made the final leap into becoming one of contemporary music’s leading ‘singer/songwriters’ with her single “It’s Too Late” backed with “I Feel The Earth Move” and her album Tapestry on Lou Adler’s Ode Records. We all know of the songwriting prowess of Carole King. She and he one-time husband Gerry Goffin wrote hundreds of songs during the so-called ‘Brill Building’ era. By the way, the famous Brill Building, a 1931 landmark historic building located at 1619 Broadway at the corner of West 49th Street, in Manhattan, was purchased last year by real estate investors for $250 million, and is being turned into a retail and office complex, including the Songwriters Hall of Fame among the tenants. Carole and Gerry spent years there honing their craft as one of Pop music’s preeminent songsters. Carole had a few minor solo releases as a singer prior to 1971, but this one made her an ‘overnight’ superstar.

This is week the fourth of eventual five weeks sitting atop the Hot 100 Singles chart for the dual No. 1 45 RPM consisting of “It’s Too Late”, co-written by Toni Stern. It reportedly is about an affair Stern had with James Taylor. Now, here’s “I Feel The Earth Move.”

The two sides as co-No.1 songs was an anomaly that Billboard Magazine’s Pop Singles chart used for a short time in the early ‘70’s by counting both sides as one entry.


 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING

 

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘71

No.1

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

“IT’S TOO LATE”

(Carole King / Toni Stern)

Flip-Side

“I FEEL THE EARTH MOVE”

CAROLE KING

ODE RECORDS66015

Produced by: Lou Adler 

On this Easy Listening chart, “It’s Too Late” sat in the No. 1 slot without being termed a dual-sided hit. It was clear that for Middle-of-the-Road audiences, this track was the champion. This week, “It’s Too Late” was in the third of five survey-periods at the crest of the Top 40 Easy Listening special survey. “It’s Too Late” featured the musicianship of Danny Cooch on congas and electric guitar, Joel O’Brien on drums, Charles Larkey on electric bass, Ralph Schuckett on electric piano and Curtis Amy on sax. Russ Kunkel played drums on some of the other tracks on the LP. Collectively, King called the group the City. The Tapestry LP would yield another dual-sided hit single with the songs “So Far Away” and “Smackwater Jack” reaching number 14 on the Pop chart in the early fall of ’71. (**See below.)

 

BEST SELLING SOUL

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘71

 

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“MR. BIG STUFF” 

(Joe Broussard / Ralph Williams / Carrol Washington)                

 

Flip-Side

“WHY I KEEP LIVING THESE MEMORIES”

JEAN KNIGHT

STAX RECORDS0088

Produced and Arranged by: Wardell Quezergue for Malaco Productions 

Jean Knight (real last name Caliste) is a singer from New Orleans who caught the attention of legendary producer Huey Meaux in 1965. Her time under his tutelage went nowhere. For a time, she worked as a baker at Loyola University as her musical ambitions had stalled. But after she hooked-up with a songwriter name Ralph Williams in 1970, he put her in touch with producer Wardell Quezergue. This week in ’71, Jean Knight had an over two-million-selling single sitting in the pinnacle position on the Best Selling Soul Singles special survey with “Mr. Big Stuff” on Stax Records. The song almost never saw the record shelves, let alone radio air-play, as Stax originally passed on the track! The song was recorded by the same musicians (Producer and organist Wardell Quezergue, Vernie Robins on the incredible bass licks, James Stroud on drums, Jerry Puckett on guitar along with Peter Lomax on trumpet and Hugh Garraway on sax) in the same studio (the Malaco Studio in Jackson, Mississippi) on the same day as another giant No. 1 Soul hit; “Groove Me” by King Floyd. After the success of that hit on another label, Stax re-thought that sound-a-like cut, “Mr. Big Stuff” from Jean Knight and a feminist anthem was born.

Speaking of “Groove Me” (having a very similar groove to “Mr. Big Stuff”) that Malaco 45 RPM by King Floyd came out on its subsidiary label Chimneyville Records months before Jean Knight’s track came screeching onto the charts. I adore that “Groove Me” track; and even though it was not No. 1 this week, it was on top of the Soul singles survey for four chronicle-phases at the end of December 1970, into the first three weeks of 1971. So here’s “Groove Me” (No. 6 Pop) from King Floyd; and note the obvious similarities between this and “Mr. Big Stuff.”

King Floyd’s record “only” sold over one million copies; as opposed to the two million 45 RPM’s marketed by Stax and Jean Knight. Her hit sat in the No. 2 spot on the Hot 100 Singles Pop chart for two weeks, prevented from reaching No. 1 later in the summer of ’71 by some group called Bee Gees with “How Can You Mend A Broken Heart.”

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JULY 10, 1971

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘71:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

TAPESTRY

CAROLE KING

ODE (70) RECORDS – 77009

Produced by: Lou Adler 

It was Lou Adler who founded Ode Records in 1968 after his success with the Mama and the Papas and Scott McKenzie. For its first couple of year in existence, Ode was distributed by Columbia Records. Right around the time of Carole King’s first solo album on Ode called Writer in 1970; Adler made a manufacturing and distribution accord with long-time friend Herb Alpert’s (and Jerry Moss’) A&M Records through ‘76. This week in 1971, King’s album Tapestry was in the fourth of an ultimate 15 survey-phases as the prime LP in the U.S.A. Tapestry was in so many record collections so quickly, that the second single from it was almost moot. “So Far Away” and “Smackwater Jack” was considered another dual-sided hit that climbed the charts in the same position on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles chart. James Taylor (who would have one of Carole’s compositions reach No. 1 in the weeks ahead) played acoustic guitar on the studio version of “So Far Away.” Here are the two ‘70s giants together.

Now here’s the single’s B side, “Smackwater Jack” in a live setting for the BBC. 

King’s own version of Taylor’s hit, “You’ve Got A Friend,” was on the LP as well as her interpretation of “A Natural Woman (You Make Me Feel)” which was famously recorded in ’67 by the right-rockin’ Lady Soul, Aretha Franklin. All told, Tapestry went on to sell more than 10 million copies in the U.S. alone. The song “It’s Too Late” and the album Tapestry is one of the few Grammy® wins by a female artist for Song of the Year, Record of the Year, and Album of the Year the last two with producer Lou Adler. King also won for Best Pop Vocal Performance – Female. Tapestry was also one of the all-time records on the Billboard Pop Album chart remaining on the chart for 302 weeks--nearly six years. Many re-issues of the Ode Records release have been made over the years in analog and digital formats, but it’s safe to say that if you were coming of age in the early ‘70s, you’ve got the original somewhere in your collection; even if it’s in mom’s basement.

 

BEST SELLING SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘71:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

ARETHA LIVE AT FILMORE WEST

ARETHA FRANKLIN

 ATLANTIC RECORDS7205

Produced by: Jerry Wexler and Arif Mardin

Other than James Brown’s Live At The Apollo, this week’s No. 1 album on the Hot Soul LPs special survey showcases some of the finest live-setting R&B ever put on tape. Aretha Live At Fillmore West was in the prime position on this chart for the fourth of five back-to-back survey-stages on Atlantic Records. Featured on the LP were Ray Charles and Billy Preston showcasing their talents, along with her musical director King Curtis on sax, and several key crack musicians Aretha recorded and toured with during this phase of her storied career, including: Cornell Dupree on guitar, Jerry Jemmott on bass, the sublime Bernard Purdee on drums, Poncho Morales on congas, Truman Thomas on piano along with the Memphis Horns. The backing vocals were performed by the so-called Sweethearts Of Soul; Brenda Bryant, Margaret Branch and Pat Smith. This album was recorded live at the Fillmore West concert hall during three nights: March 5, 6 and 7, 1971 and featured Ray Charles singing “Spirit In The Dark” with Lady Soul. Here’s the 25 minute version of that performance. Sit back and get ready to be sanctified.

There have been a few super deluxe editions released, containing the songs recorded during those three nights in San Francisco. It was clear by those re-issues, that the concert was not just about Aretha. In fact, on the most recent four-CD set, it was clear that King Curtis was a sort of co-headliner, as he and his band got to do several songs without Sista Re. Aretha’s current studio single was “Bridge Over Troubled Water” which was also featured in this live recording. Her rendition of Paul Simon’s song reached No. 6 on the Hot 100 and spent two non-consecutive weeks atop the Top Soul Singles listing during the end of May into early June of ’71. Her next single just missed No. 1 on the Pop charts—but did hit the crest of the Soul Singles chart—a remake of Ben E. King’s immortal “Spanish Harlem” that Aretha made her own later in the summer.

 

  

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JULY 11, 1987

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 17) “I STILL HAVEN’T FOUND WHAT I’M LOOKING FOR”

(U2 – Adam Clayton / Dave Evans / Paul Hewson / Larry Mullen)                                                       
Produced by: Daniel Lanois & Brian Eno                
Mixed by: Daniel Lanois

U2 ISLAND99430

**************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 4) “HEAD TO TOE”

(Full Force – Curtis Bedeau / Gerard Charles / Hugh Clark / Brian George / Lucien George /  Paul George) 
Produced by: Full Force

 LISA LISA And CULT JAM COLUMBIA38-07008

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 11) “SOMETHING SO STRONG”  

(Neil Finn / Mitchell Froom)                                   
Produced by: Mitchell Froom

CROWDED HOUSE CAPITOL5695

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 10) “FUNKY TOWN  

(Steve Greenberg)                                               
Produced by: Brian Canham

PSEUDO ECHO RCA 5217

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 9) “POINT OF NO RETURN”

(Lewis A. Martineé)                                                
Produced and Arranged by: Lewis A. Martineé
Executive Produced by: Francisco J. Diaz      

EXPOSÉ ARISTA9325

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 7) “DON’T DISTURB THIS GROOVE”

(Mic Murphy / David Frank)                               
Produced and Arranged by: The System (Mike Murphy & David Frank) for Science Lab Productions

THE SYSTEM ATLANTIC 89320

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 5) “SONGBIRD”

(Kenny Gorelick)                                                  
Produced by: Preston Glass for Perfection Light Productions and Kenny G

KENNY G ARISTA 9588

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “SHAKEDOWN (From Beverly Hills Cop II)”

(Harold Faltermeyer / Keith Forsey / Bob Seger)
Produced by: Harold Faltermeyer & Keith Forsey

BOB SEGER MCA53094

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No. 2 (LW 1) “I WANNA DANCE WITH SOMEBODY (Who Loves Me)”

(George Merrill / Shannon Rubicam)                

Produced by: Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions                                              
Executive Produced by: Clive Davis                

WHITNEY HOUSTONARISTA9598

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No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“ALONE”

 (Billy Steinberg / Tom Kelly)

Flip-Side

“BARRACUDA (live)”

HEART

CAPITOL RECORDS44002

Produced and Engineered by: Ron Nevison

 

The roots of “Alone” go back a few years before the group Heart got a hold of it. The song was No. 1 for the first of three survey-cycles this week in ’87 on the Hot 100 Singles list. The writers of the song, Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly, had recorded the tune as early at 1983 with their own outfit called i-Ten; a reference to the Interstate Highway that runs from Southern California to Florida. I never heard of that act either. Obviously, “Alone” was very lonely that first time around. Then, future Full House actor John Stamos (and before his selling yogurt days) and Valerie Stephenson recorded the song for a short-lived sitcom TV show called Dreams in ’84; co-starring Jamie Gertz and produced by Bill Bixby. I did my homework to find out that obscure info. I don’t remember the TV show; do you? Anyway…both songwriters got the song to the band Heart, and they recorded it with one of the composers (Kelly) singing high harmony parts on the track.

“Alone” was the first 45 RPM from the album Bad Animals on Capitol Records; and was the second biggest chart single of 1987. Writers Steinberg and Kelly did a new demo of the track to submit to Heart’s producer Ron Nevison. That did the trick, as Ann Wilson nailed the song. After years of up and down success, Heart almost called it quits before they scored on Capitol with their 1985 album simply called Heart. Three straight Top 10 singles came from that LP: “What About Love” (No. 10 Pop) “Never” (No. 4 Pop) and “These Dreams” (No. 1 Pop) in early ’86. Buoyed by that success, the band released four singles from Bad Animals, including: “Alone” (No. 1 Pop for three weeks, No. 2 Adult Contemporary and No. 3 on the Mainstream Rock chart) “Who Will You Run To” (No. 7 Pop and No. 2 on that Mainstream Rock list) “There’s The Girl” (No. 12 Pop) and “I Want You So Bad” (No. 49 Pop) a relative clunker. At this point, Heart consisted of Ann and Nancy Wilson, Howard Leese on guitar, Denny Carmassi on drums and Mark Andes on bass. They utilized additional keyboard players to round out the sound on the LP. Heart’s roots go back to 1963, but Ann Wilson joined the band then called White Heart in 1970 and was tightened up to just Heart by ’74. Their first success was on the small record label called Mushroom with an album called Dreamboat Annie. That LP featured their first chart hits, “Crazy On You” (No. 35 Pop) and their first Top 10 hit, “Magic Man” (No. 9 Pop) in the summer of ’76. That was one of the first songs your Big Jay played in my move from small market radio to a 50,000 watt FM Rock radio that year. Contract issues ensued with a shift to another label, only to find mostly mid-chart success. They went on hiatus in the mid-‘90s, only to reform with several personnel changes along the way; even after their huge successes in the ‘80s. Heart has maintained their stature as one of the North America’s finest bands. After being nominated, but not gaining entry in 2012; Heart was finally inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2013 with original ‘70s members and musicians from their glory days of the ‘80s. Heart has the distinction of being the only female-fronted group to have Top 10 albums in the ‘70s, ‘80’s, ‘90s and 2010’s.  



HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“I WANNA DANCE WITH SOMEBODY (Who Loves Me)”

(George Merrill / Shannon Rubicam)

Flip-Side

“MOMENT OF TRUTH”

WHITNEY HOUSTON

ARISTA RECORDS9598


Produced by: Narada Michael Walden

This was the second of three uninterrupted weeks at the peak of the Hot Adult Contemporary chart for Whitney Houston’s Arista Records release, “I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me,)” which eventually sold more than two-million singles. Some critics said this track was too much like her earlier hit “How Will I Know.” Others said it was comparable to Cyndi Lauper’s smash “Girls Just Want To Have Fun.” But Houston went on to win a Grammy® for the track in the category of Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. The song came from the incredibly popular album Whitney, that spawned four back-to-back No. 1 Hot 100 Singles survey songs (actually her seventh in a row going back to 1985 with her first album’s three No. 1 songs) with this week’s chart-topper on the Hot Adult Contemporary list; the first from this album. The song had a two survey-period run at the apex of the Hot 100 the previous two weeks.  

That’s producer Narada Michael Walden on drums on this track. In addition to a few female backing vocalists, including Whitney, that’s backing singer Jim Gilstrap—the same guy who sang the first stanza of Stevie Wonder’s “You Are The Sunshine Of My Life” back in ’72—on the record. Plus, another semi-familiar voice is in the background; Keven Dorsey of the Gospel vocal group, the Andraé Crouch Singers. Songwriter George Merrill (who was the male singer in the duo Boy Meets Girl of “Waiting For A Star To Fall”-fame) also wrote “How Will I Know” and collaborated with the female part of that act, Shannon Rubicam on both of those hits for Whitney.


HOT BLACK SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“I FEEL GOOD ALL OVER” 

(Gabriel & Annette Hardeman)

Flip-Side

“I FEEL GOOD ALL OVER (SUITE)”

STEPHANIE MILLS

MCA RECORDS – 53056

Produced by: Nick Martinelli for Watchout Productions

Executive Producers: Stephanie Mills and Cassandra Mills

Arranged by: Gabriel Hardeman & Nick Martinelli 

The biggest record of the week on the Hot Black Singles chart was “I Feel Good All Over” from veteran singer Stephanie Mills on MCA Records. This was the second of three back-to-back survey-cycles as the chart-capper. Oddly, “I Feel Good All Over” didn’t feel anything on the Hot 100 Pop survey. The cut was the first single from the Stephanie Mills album If I Were Your Woman. That song (the 1970-71 hit from Gladys Knight & the Pips) was a prominent track. “I Feel Good All Over” was Stephanie’s first No. 1 song on this chart for the Brooklyn native.




Mills didn’t stop there with the hits from her LP. The next single, “(You’re Puttin’) A Rush On Me” just barely squeaked into the Hot 100 Pop list at No. 85 for just two weeks; but it went all the way to the pinnacle of the Hot Black Singles survey in October of ’87 for a sole week. Her LP If I Were Your Woman reached No. 1 for a sole week, interrupting (for that seven-day survey-period) the run of LL Cool J’s Bigger and Deffer album. (**See below.) Mills began having hits way back in ’79 with “What ‘Cha Gonna Do With My Lovin’” on 20th Century Records (No. 22 Pop) and had her biggest chart success in 1980 with her only million-selling single, “Never Knew Love Like This Before” also on 20th Century. A duet with Teddy Pendergrass called “Two Hearts” was her last Top 40 Pop entry; but Stephanie Mills had 29 R&B hits from ’79 through 1993. At the age of 11, Stephanie Mills was the victor of the Amateur Night at the Apollo Theater in Harlem a record six times. One of her next claims to fame happened when she played Dorothy in the Broadway version of The Wiz in the original Broadway production of The Wiz in 1975. The full title of the play was: The Wiz: The Super Soul Musical “Wonderful Wizard of Oz.” That production won seven Tony® Awards, including Best Musical. That propelled Mills to the national spotlight. And wouldn’t you know; Stephanie has become the first actor cast in NBC’s upcoming The Wiz Live! TV special scheduled for this coming holiday season. Only this time, Mills will play Auntie Em!



 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JULY 11, 1987

 

TOP POP

ALBUMS 

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

WHITNEY

WHITNEY HOUSTON

ARISTA RECORDS8405

Produced by: Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions
(Cuts A-1, A-2, A-5, B-2, B-4, B-5 and B-6)

Produced by: Michael Masser
(Cuts A-4 and B-3)

Produced by: Jellybean for Jellybean Productions, Inc.
(Cut A-3)

Produced and Arranged by: Kashif
(Cut B-1)

All other vocal tracks Arranged by Whitney Houston 

Executive Producer: Clive Davis

Whitney, the second album from Jersey-girl Whitney Houston, was in the third of an eventual 11 consecutive weeks at the pinnacle slot of the Top Pop Albums survey. It debuted at No. 1 on Arista Records. The first single “I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)” was concurrently No. 1 on the Hot 100 Singles chart during the last two survey-periods, and was No. 1 on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart this week (**See above.) It undoubtedly tempted record-buyers into getting their hands on the album the instant it was released. The next single, “Didn’t We Almost Have It All” was another ballad from the diva (released in July) and was No. 1 for two weeks at the conclusion of the summer in ‘87. Here’s that song, produced and written by Michael Masser from a TV appearance.  


The third single from the Whitney album sold over a million copies called “So Emotional.” The fourth was No. 1 Pop for two weeks in the early autumn called “Where Do Broken Hearts Go.” The fifth and final official single from Whitney was “Love Will Save The Day” and it broke the streak of seven consecutive No. 1 Hot 100 singles, plus stopped the four No. 1 single-streak from this LP. The album Whitney had four producers, including: Narada Michael Walden (seven of the 11 tracks) along with Michael Masser (two cuts) John “Jellybean” Benitez (one track) and Kashif Saleem (born Michael Jones) with one as well. Whitney was the first album from a female artist to debut at No. 1 on the Pop Albums (Top 200) chart in its history. It went on to sell over nine million copies.

 


TOP BLACK ALBUMS

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘87:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

BIGGER and DEFFER 
(a/k/a)

BAD

LL COOL J

DEF JAM / COLUMBIA RECORDS40793

Produced by: James Todd Smith
Production Supervisor: Russell Simmons
 

Ladies Love Cool James—that they did in 1987, and still do. They liked him as a teenager performing Rap music while going to Andrew Jackson High School in Queens, NY. He dropped out after his success with his first release, “I Need A Beat” in 1984. He appeared in the Hip-Hop classic film Krush Groove in ’86. But, this was just the start of bigger fame for James Todd Smith, as he had the Top Black Album chart-leader this week in ’87 for the first of 10 non-successive survey-periods with Bigger and Deffer also known as BAD. The cover photo was taken in front of that high school in Queens where he dropped-out a few years prior. His then current single, “I’m Bad,” was not a huge Pop hit (peaking at No. 84 on the Hot 100) but it had legs on the Hot Black Singles list, peaking at No. 4 on Def Jam Records; founded by Russell Simmons and Rick Rubin.

Another track from Bigger and Deffer called “I Need Love” was what some have called the first Rap ballad. It reached No. 14 on the Hot 100 Pop list and No. 1 on the Hot Black Singles chart in the early fall of ’87. His next album, Walking With A Panther, was called a ‘sell-out’ Hip-Hop album by some commentators for its “mainstream” appeal, as it reached No. 6 on the Top Pop Albums chart as well as another chart-capper on the Top Black Albums survey in the summer of ‘88. He was booed at the time during an appearance at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, where he admitted he was out of touch with his ‘Rap’ constituency at that moment. LL Cool J had his first million-selling single with “Going Back To Cali” from the album Walking With A Panther. He’s had well over two dozen Pop and R&B chart hits since ’87. By the late 1990s, LL Cool J had officially crossed over to the vocation of a genuine film and TV actor, and is considered one of the biggest performers in Hollywood, playing Special Agent Sam Hanna on CBS Television since 2009 on NCIS: Los Angeles. He has been the host of the last four Grammy® Awards shows on TV. James has been nominated three times, but not yet inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Have a super week &

BE BIG!

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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