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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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June 26th, 2015

THE

BIG
SINGLES

 

For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

JULY 2, 1966

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 7) “BAREFOOTIN’”

(Robert Parker)

ROBERT PARKER NOLA721  

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 4) “DID YOU EVER HAVE TO MAKE UP YOUR MIND”

(John Sebastian)

THE LOVIN’ SPOONFUL KAMA SUTRA209

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 5) “I AM A ROCK”  

(Paul Simon)

SIMON & GARFUNKEL COLUMBIA 43617

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 8) “COOL JERK  

(Donald Storball)

THE CAPITOLS KAREN1524   

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 15) “HANKY PANKY”

(Jeff Barry / Ellie Greenwich)

TOMMY JAMES And the SHONDELLS ROULETTE4686

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 9) “YOU DON’T HAVE TO SAY YOU LOVE ME” 

(Giuseppe “Pino” Donaggio / Vito Pallavcini / Vicki Wickham / Simon Napier-Bell)

DUSTY SPRINGFIELD PHILIPS40371

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 3) “PAINT IT BLACK” 

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richard)

THE ROLLING STONES LONDON901

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 6) “RED RUBBER BALL”

(Paul Simon / Bruce Woodley)

THE CYRKLE COLUMBIA43589

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 1) “PAPERBACK WRITER”

(John Lennon / Paul McCartney)

THE BEATLES CAPITOL 5651

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“STRANGERS IN THE NIGHT”

 (Charles Singleton / Eddie Snyder / Burt Kaempfert)

Produced by: Jimmy Bowen

Flip-Side:

“OH, YOU CRAZY MOON”

FRANK SINATRA

REPRISE RECORDS0470

After just nine weeks on the survey, the “Chairman of the Board” Frank Sinatra had his only No. 1 (solo) hit during the rock era (from 1955-present) this week on the Hot 100 Singles list in ’66. The Sinatra-owned record company, Reprise Records’ Artists & Repertoire (A&R) head Jimmy Bowen was given an instrumental track by a music publisher  recorded by German composer/artist Burt Kaempfert. (**See below.) That piece of music (originally titled “Beddy Bye”) as score music for a film) was taken from the soundtrack to the film A Man Could Get Killed. That film starred James Garner, Melina Mercouri, Sandra Dee and Tony Franciosa. Here’s some juicy gossip about Garner and Franciosa. It’s been reported that a fight scene in the film looked a bit too real; because it was. They had a serious dislike for each other. No word about why. But, now back to the tune. English lyrics were written to Kaempfert’s “Beddy Bye” melody by Charles Singleton and Eddie Snyder, and Sinatra’s version called “Strangers In The Night” ended up on top of the charts.

“Strangers In The Night” would only stay at the peak of the Hot 100 for a sole week, but toppled the Beatles “Paperback Writer” after they had been at the pinnacle for two survey-periods.  One version of the story of the genesis of “Strangers In The Night” has Kaempfert (the first man to properly record the Beatles in Germany) purchasing the melody from (what some say) the original writer Ivo Robic. On the Sinatra single, Robic’s name isn’t there. But someone had to come up with the original Yugoslavian lyrics, and that has been accepted. Some music sleuths contend Kaempfert DID write it with someone entirely different; Marija Renota. And yet another writer claims to have penned the tune alone; originally called “Broken Guitar” by a guy named Avo Uvezian. Because of the disputes, royalties for the song were held up for years. For usage in the film, the instrumental track was referred to as “Beddy’s Theme”—a reference to Garner’s character William Beddoes. Connie Francis recorded the tune just over a week before Sinatra, but it was not released immediately. Here’s HER re-cut version for comparison.

Ok…standard Connie Francis styling. Crooner Jack Jones on Kapp Records was the first to release the song with English words, without having the hit. So, here’s that first English RELEASED version from Jack Jones.

The Sinatra recording (featuring “Wrecking Crew member Glen Campbell on guitar) produced by Jimmy Bowen, sold over a million copies, and was the next to last No. 1 Hot 100 hit for “The Chairman-of-the-Board” of Reprise Records. Sinatra hated the song—REALLY detested it. What did he know? The Grammy® folks disagreed and named it Record of the Year.

 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“STRANGERS IN THE NIGHT”

(Charles Singleton / Eddie Snyder / Burt Kaempfert)

Produced by: Jimmy Bowen

Flip-Side:

“OH, YOU CRAZY MOON”

REPRISE RECORDS0470 

Had enough yet? I hope not. Now learn MORE about the original recording that led to “Old Blue Eyes” having a giant record. Burt Kaempfert’s original version of “Strangers In The Night” featured the trumpet playing from a guy named Fred Moch (whole name was Peter Klemt Manfred Moch) and as a former trumpet player in Jr. High School, and a guy who had to play Burt Kaempfert’s records during my very first job in radio (jeez, I’m old) I would often listen to the way he played his solos. I must admit, he had a unique style that I liked, and that Kaempfert used to his advantage. Moch’s trumpet technique was (perhaps) one of Kaempfert’s signature sounds. For you “Easy Listening” music fans, here’s that original instrumental track from Bert Kaempfert (who died in 1980) with Fred Moch (he died 2011) and his Orchestra. Again, ignore the cheesy video—please—just listen.

By the way, both Sinatra’s vocal and Kaempfert’s instrumental version of “Strangers In The Night” debuted on those Billboard lists on the same day, for the week ending on May 7, 1966. This was the fifth of an eventual seven continuous survey-stages for Sinatra on the Top 40 Easy Listening Chart; easily his biggest hit in 11 years, when “Learnin’ The Blues” topped the old Most Played By Disc Jockey’s chart in May of 1955! Kaempfert’s original version of “Strangers In The Night” (produced by Milt Gabler—a Rock & Roll Hall of Famer in the Non Performing category) never hit the Hot 100, but it did peak on the “Bubbling Under” chart at No. 124; only on that list for two weeks on Decca Records in the U.S. Another intriguing fact: Bert Kaempfert was in the German Navy during World War II. I’m drained now thanks to “Strangers In The Night.”

 

TOP SELLING

R&B

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘66

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“AIN’T TOO PROUD TO BEG”

(Eddie Holland / Norman Whitfield)

Produced by: Norman Whitfield

 

Flip-Side:

“YOU’LL LOSE A PRECIOUS LOVE”

 

THE TEMPTATIONS

GORDY RECORDS7054

In ’66, “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” from the Temptations was in the second of a definitive eight non-consecutive seven-day assessment-periods at the high point of the Top Selling R&B Singles special survey. The song was produced by Norman Whitfield and co-written by him and legendary lyric-writer Eddie Holland, Jr. Here is the ONLY mix of the song that matters—the original monaural 45 RPM release on Gordy Records.

The accomplishment of “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” with Whitfield as the producer, cost Smokey Robinson his job as the vocal group’s main muse after “Get Ready” failed to attain a high chart location on the Hot 100—deemed a failure by Berry Gordy, Jr. So, Whitfield would slowly evolve the Temptations away from a lavish R&B sound into a blending of semi-psychedelic rock and more sophisticated soul grooves. In fact, the Temptations didn’t realize the instantaneous success of the song, and were ordered to present “Ain’t Too Proud To Beg” on American Bandstand as a last-minute substitution; making up dance steps minutes before the national broadcast. The 45 RPM reached No. 13 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was released from the album Gettin’ Ready, featuring “Get Ready.” That single only garnered the maximum position of No. 29 on the Hot 100—though it did manage to reach the peak of the R&B singles register earlier in ’66.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JULY 2, 1965

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

WHAT NOW MY LOVE

HERB ALPERT & The TIJUANA BRASS

A&M RECORDS4114

Produced by: Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss

The ancestry of the title track on this album started across the sea in France, when composer/singer Gilbert Bécaud wrote a melody called “Et Maintenant” in ’61; a major hit in that country. The translation was “What Now My Love” and the English vocabulary were fashioned by Big-Band-era lyricist Carl Sigman. Take Big Jay’s original Time Machine up to 1966, and Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass had the No. 1 album on the Top Pop LPs chart with the new version of song “What Now My Love” as the title track.

What Now My Love was the unit’s sixth studio album, and was enjoying the sixth of a concluding eight non-consecutive weeks in that spot on A&M Records. The Beatles’ LP Yesterday And Today interrupted the run of What Now My Love, with Revolver (also by the Fab Four) replacing it the second time at the zenith of that chart. It was the longest-running Tijuana Brass album in longevity in the survey’s top slot. In reality, just Alpert performed on the record; as the Tijuana Brass was, in point of fact, ace studio musicians later hailed as called “The Wrecking Crew” in L.A. Watch for a sensational documentary about the Wrecking Crew, available any moment. For touring purposes, Alpert had hired-hands regularly dressed in stereotypical Mexican-styled attire on stage. “What Now My Love” was the lone 45 RPM to be released from the LP; but it was a two-sided hit with “What Now My Love” attaining No. 24 position on the Hot 100. Reaching the chart the same day (for the week ending March 19, 1966, the B side, “Spanish Flea” ended up almost catching the A side on the Hot 100; getting to No. 27. As many of you may know, “Spanish Flea” became the one of the interview segments’ introduction music on TV’s The Dating Game, originally hosted by Jim Lange, who passed away in 2014. The OPENING theme song to the TV program beginning in 1965 was by Chet Baker & the Mariachi Brass. Here’s proof of the obvious rip-off of Herb Alpert’s Wrecking Crew musicians.

The Dating Game was syndicated in the ‘70s with a different version of “Spanish Flea.”  By the way, the original “Spanish Flea” track was NOT included on the album What Now My Love. The photograph on the front of the LP featured Alpert and his A&M partner Jerry Moss’ wife Sandra Moss clinging on to Herb; the fourth and last Tijuana Brass album to use an appealing woman on the cover. Alpert & Moss or A&M Records was initially called Carnival Records; but rapidly changed when they discovered that another company already had the moniker. All of this writing about fleas (Spanish or otherwise) is making me itch. Spanish FLY—well, that’s a whole other subject—of which I know nothing about.

 

TOP SELLING

R&B

LPs

CHART

“Special Survey”

THIS WEEK IN ‘66:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

LOU RAWLS LIVE!

Lou Rawls

 CAPITOL RECORDS2459

Produced by: David Axelrod

Lou Rawls came out of the shadows of his association, and then the death of Sam Cooke, with his own assortment of swingin' jazz and soul-stirrin’ blues tunes with this live album that was the principal record on the Top Selling R&B LPs chart this week in ’66. Lou Rawls LIVE! didn’t have any Pop hits on this album, but it resonated with a Middle-of-the-Road and Jazz-leaning R&B crowds with his interpretation of “The Shadow Of Your Smile” from the film The Sandpiper.  



This was Rawls’ first chart hit on the Top Selling R&B chart at No. 33. The LP was recorded live over the course of two nights in late January and early February in Los Angeles at the studios of Capitol Records with an invited audience attending. On the liner notes to the LP, written by the record’s producer, David Axelrod, gives the names of the backing musicians: James Bond (not 007, but the Philly musician) on bass guitar, the magnificent drummer Earl Palmer, along with Tommy Strode on piano and Herb Ellis on guitar. Even though Rawls had a minor Pop chart his in ’65 called “Three O’Clock In The Morning” (only on the Pop chart for one week at No. 83) it wasn’t until later in the autumn of ’66 (after this live album was released) that Rawls would have his breakthrough mass-appeal Pop hit with “Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing,” which went to No. 1 on the Top Selling R&B Singles list and No. 13 on the Hot 100. Rawls is perhaps best known for his biggest chart hit, “You’ll Never Find Another Love Like Mine,” (No. 2 Pop, No. 1 R&B and Adult Contemporary) in 1976 (his only million-seller) and for “A Natural Man,” (No 17 Pop) in ’71, co-written by Brill Building regular and comedian Sandy Baron (real name Sanford Irving Beresofsky) along with the “Sunny” guy (No. 2 Pop in ’66) Bobby Hebb. I know I’m still in 1966 for this segment; but I want to feature ‘71’s “A Natural Man,” as it’s a Big Jay fave. “Bam! Right-on.”

“A Natural Man” (which featured the Mike Curb Congregation as backing singers—I know, what?) won Rawls a Grammy® Award for Best R&B Male Vocal; deservedly so.     



 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the Chart-Week

 

ENDING

 

JULY 4, 1970

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘70:

 

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 7) “GET READY”

(William Robinson)

RARE EARTH RARE EARTH5012

 ***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 9) “THE WONDER OF YOU”

(Baker Knight)

Backed With:

“MAMA LIKED THE ROSES

(Johnny Christopher)

ELVIS PRESLEY RCA VICTOR47-9835

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 8) “LAY DOWN (Candles In The Rain)”  

(Melanie Safka)

MELANIE

With The Edwin Hawkins Singers BUDDAH167

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 11) “BAND OF GOLD”

(Ronald Dunbar / Edith Wayne)

FREDA PAYNE INVICTUS 9075

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 6) “RIDE CAPTAIN RIDE”

(Blues Image – Frank “Skip” Conte / Mike Pinera /    Joe Lala / Manuel Bertamatti / Malcolm Jones)

BLUES IMAGE ATCO6746

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 5) “HITCHIN’ A RIDE” 

(Mitch Murray / Peter Callander)

VANITY FARE PAGE ONE 21,029

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “THE LONG AND WINDING ROAD”

(John Lennon / Paul McCartney)

Backed With:

“FOR YOU BLUE”

(George Harrison)

THE BEATLES APPLE 2832

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “BALL OF CONFUSION (That’s What The World Is Today)”

(Norman Whitfield / Barrett Strong)

THE TEMPTATIONS GORDY7099

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 2) “MAMA TOLD ME (Not To Come)”

(Randy Newman)

THREE DOG NIGHT DUNHILL / ABC4239

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“THE LOVE YOU SAVE”

 

 (The Corporation ™ --

Deke Richards / Freddie Perren / Fonce Mizzell / Berry Gordy, Jr. )

Backed With:

“I FOUND THAT GIRL”

(The Corporation ™ --

Deke Richards / Freddie Perren / Fonce Mizzell / Berry Gordy, Jr. )

MOTOWN RECORDS1116

 

Both sides produced by:

The Corporation ™

and Hal Davis

 

THE

JACKSON 5

 

MOTOWN RECORDS1166

 

“The Love You Save” from The Jackson 5 was the No. 1 45 RPM in the land this week in 1970 for the second and final survey-stage on Motown Records. It was the third consecutive No. 1 single for the group from Gary, Indiana. There would be yet another chart-topping tune from the act in the weeks ahead; “I’ll Be There,” debuting on the Hot 100 just seven weeks after “The Love You Save” made its first showing. That track was taken from the hastily put together LP called Third Album. That’s how hot this group was, and Motown wanted more product. Once Berry Gordy, Jr. had finally figured out that the Jackson 5 was a potential gold mine, he put together (what he trademarked as) The Corporation ™ to write and produce them initially. “The Love You Save” was spawned by the album titled ABC, also featuring that title track “ABC.” I want to be specific about the writing vs. producers credits, as some songs on the Jackson 5’s ABC LP (including these two dual-sided hits) were listed as written by Deke Richards, Freddie Perren, Fonce Mizzell and Berry Gordy, Jr.; while others were credited as being produced by The Corporation ™, including “ABC.” On the two sided single, Hal Davis co-produced the tracks. But it doesn’t SAY that on the 45 release, but it does on the ALBUM. First, here’s “The Love You Save.”

Now, the B side which was listed on the Hot 100 as a co-release, but only for four weeks; while the A side lasted 13 survey-periods on that survey. Here’s “I Found That Girl.”

It was obvious which side was the true hit song, as “I Found That Girl,” with lead vocals by Jermaine Jackson (now legally calling himself Jermaine Jacksun (spelled correctly) was only on the chart for four weeks. Billboard Magazine had some odd reasons at the time for putting certain B sides on an equal footing with the A sides. Often, the chart-heads were incorrect with their initial decision as this single proves.

 

TOP 40

EASY LISTENING

 

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79

No.1

MIDDLE-OF-THE-ROAD

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“A SONG OF JOY (Himno A La Alegria)”

 

(Based on the Last Movement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony)     
(Orbe – W. De Los Rios - Adapted by R. Parker)

Flip-Side

“EL RIO”

MIGUEL RIOS

A&M RECORDS1193

Orchestra And Chorus Conducted by: Waldo de los Rios
Produced by: Rafael Trabuccelli 

Wow man—and roll over Ludwig van Beethoven. Call this one “Symphonic Rock.” A Classical piece (based upon Beethoven’s last movement of the Ninth Symphony) was on the Pop and Easy Listening charts! “A Song Of Joy (Himno A La Alegria)” was the biggest 45 RPM on the Top 40 Easy Listening special survey for the second and final week from Granada, Spain’s Miguel Rios. Yes, this 45 RPM (and the ensuing LP) was recorded in Spain by Rios under the direction of conductor/arranger/composer Waldo de los Rios (no relation) and produced by Rafael Trabuccelli; that country’s leading producer for much of the ‘60s and ‘70s. This record eventually attained the No. 14 position on the Hot 100 here in America. This week, “A Song Of Joy (Himno A La Alegria)” was No. 17 with a “star” or also known as a “bullet.” Listen to this powerful track and pretty decent video to accompany it.

Miguel Rios’ recording career in 1961 began after he moved to Madrid, Spain, and was known locally as the King of Twist, originally under the name of Mike Rios. I bet Chubby Checker was not too happy to hear that. This was one of a handful of songs sung by a Spanish singer to land a Top 20 spot on the Hot 100 Singles chart. Worldwide, the single reportedly sold over three million copies. Rios got involved in Spanish TV and even films. Years later, he reportedly was a major force in Iberian Rock music. The conductor/arranger on Miguel Rios’ only American hit, Waldo de Los Rios also had a Hot 100 charting hit in 1971, another adaptation of a Classical piece listed as “Mozart Symphony No. 40 In G Minor K.550, 1st Movement” on United Artists Records. His recording reached No. 67. Conductor/arranger Waldo de los Rios committed suicide in 1977 at the age of 42.

 

BEST SELLING SOUL

SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘70

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“THE LOVE YOU SAVE”

 

(The Corporation ™ --

Deke Richards / Freddie Perren / Fonce Mizzell / Berry Gordy, Jr. ))

Flip-Side

“I FOUND THAT GIRL”

THE

JACKSON 5

 

MOTOWN RECORDS1166

Both sides produced by:

The Corporation ™

and Hal Davis

This was the third of six back-to-back survey-cycles in the pinnacle position of the Best Selling Soul Singles special survey for “The Love You Save” from the Jackson 5 on Motown Records. (**See above.)

 

THE

BIG ALBUMS

 

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JULY 4, 1970

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘70:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

LET IT BE

THE BEATLES

APPLE RECORDS34001

Original tracks produced by:      George Martin (Uncredited)

Released tracks produced for LP by:  Phil Spector

This was the album originally due to be called Get Back—but the final product ended up with many changes including the name; Let It Be. The “soundtrack” to the eventual film of the same name starring the Beatles, showed the once tight outfit dissolving in front of our eyes. The Apple Records album was at the apex of the Top LPs listing again this week; the fourth and final survey-period at the helm. Paul McCartney tweaked the other three Beatles when he released his first solo album (McCartney) ahead of the group release, which beat Let It Be to the No. 1 slot for three weeks before that record sat at the crest. So much has been written about this traumatic time in the history of the Fab Four. So, for that reason, I’ve decided leave it to you to find the best version of that segment of the Beatles saga to chew on. Here’s the title track—and the album version, produced by Phil Spector with the added searing guitar solo from George Harrison, giving this mix more of a rock-feel, along with the electric piano playing of Billy Preston.

That version was an overdub of an overdub. In layman’s terms, George Harrison had recorded a very staid guitar solo over the barren original track featuring just guitars, bass and drums. The whole point of the Get Back project was to “get back” to the basics without “electronic whatamacallit” as was printed on an advertisement for the single, “Get Back.” George Martin’s “Let It Be” mix was used for the single release in the U.K. (and the U.S.) in March of 1970. But for the LP, that extra overdub featuring Harrison’s fuzzed-out solo was included. They were not two different takes as some Beatle-People think. The A side of the single “Let It Be,” backed with the zany non-charting B side “You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)” had been No. 1 for two survey-cycles beginning with the week ending on April 11, 1970. I want you to reacquaint yourself with that B side which was never on an LP while the group was together. Here’s “You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)”—the extended version—from the Bonkers-Four.

That goofy track was recorded way back in May of 1967 and was even considered as an A side at the time. Remember, that was in their LSD-space-cadet-era. The final time the band visited the track was on May 20, 1969 in order to punch it up, so to speak with more zaniness and grunting. The follow-up to “Let It Be” was another ballad from Paul McCartney, with John Lennon playing the bass guitar (hitting a lot of sour notes I might add if you listen closely) with Macca wishing it to be a simple track. After engineer and mixer Glyn Johns took two cracks at mixing the countless hours of material into what almost was Get Back, the album, the group didn’t like it after a those attempts, even with seven months in between tries. The Fabs had spent days at Twickenham Film Studios in the cold and had to be on the set very early in the morning; not normal for Rock & Roll animals. But once Phil Spector got a hold of it (with the blessings of Lennon and Harrison) adding syrupy strings and a female chorus, Sir Paul was livid. He’d already decided to leave the Beatles, but it was John Lennon who had basically expressed the group was over way back in August of ’69! “The Long And Winding Road” backed with that final session for “For You Blue” was also a No. 1 45 RPM just a couple of weeks ago in 1970. This week the A and B sides were resting in the No. 4 spot on its slide down the survey with stiff competition. Instead of hearing “The Long And Winding Road,” I’d like to feature the happy-go-lucky George Harrison tune, “For You Blue” from the Fabs, recorded on January 25, 1969. 

“For You Blue” may very well have been the very, very last “Beatles” recording session. But George was the only one in the studio on January 8, 1970 (almost a year after it was originally recorded) actually finishing some harmony vocals which were mixed at a later dates (February and March) to be included on the final mix of the LP; with Phil Spector gaining the production credit. And because McCartney still must have been smarting over what future jailbird Spector had done to HIS work all those years ago, he helped commission Let It Be… Naked in 2003, including the original stripped-down versions sans the orchestra and choral voices; the way the group all had wanted it to be way back in January of ’69. For Beatles collectors, it’s a must-have.   

 

BEST SELLING SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘70:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

 

ABC

THE

JACKSON 5

 MOTOWN RECORDS709

Produced by: The Corporation ™ and Hal Davis

 

The Jackson 5’s LP called ABC was at the zenith of the Best Selling Soul LPs special survey this week; its third of an ultimate 12 non-consecutive survey-periods at No. 1. The album was interrupted for two weeks in August at the summit of the Soul listing by the LP called The Isaac Hayes Movement. The album named ABC contained two singles: “ABC,” backed with a remake of a Diana Ross & the Supremes B side to “No Matter What Sign You Are,” called “The Young Folks” and “The Love You Save,” (**see above) backed with “I Found That Girl.” The rest of the LP was largely packed with filler material, as The Corporation ™ couldn’t crank out material fast enough for the demand for new songs from the Jackson 5. Only two of the LP’s tracks were recorded in Motown. Among the remakes, mostly recorded in Los Angeles with some members of the Wrecking Crew, and a few of the Funk Brothers brought in from Detroit included: “(Come ‘Round Here) I’m The One You Need” which was the last single to be released under the name the Miracles, before Smokey Robinson’s name was added in ’66. Here’s the Jackson 5’s rendition from the album ABC. Note Michael Jackson speaking some of the parts, just like Smokey did four years earlier on the superb Miracles record.

Other tracks from the LP ABC included: “Don’t Know Why I Love You” and “Never Had A Dream Come True” both recorded previously by Stevie Wonder and a rendition of the Delfonics 1968 No. 4 Pop smash called “La-La-Means I Love You.” Michael was about to become a superstar after this album, that had to settle for a peak position of No. 4 on the (Pop) Top LPs chart.

 


 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JUNE 28, 1980

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 10) “SHE’S OUT OF MY LIFE”

(Tom Bahler)

MICHAEL JACKSON EPIC50871

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 11) “Medley: ‘CUPID / I’VE LOVED YOU FOR A LONG TIME”

(SamCooke)                                                                                        (Michael Zager)

SPINNERS ATLANTIC3664

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 3) “BIGGEST PART OF ME  

(David Pack)

AMBROSIA WARNER BROS.49225

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 8) “STEAL AWAY  

(Robert Dupuis)

ROBBIE DUPREE ELEKTRA 44621

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 7) “LITTLE JEANNIE”

(Elton John / Gary Osborne)

ELTON JOHN MCA41236

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 5) “AGAINST THE WIND” 

(Bob Seger)

BOB SEGER CAPITOL 4863

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 6) “IT’S STILL ROCK AND ROLL TO ME” 

(Billy Joel)

BILLLY JOEL COLUMBIA11276

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 4) “THE ROSE”

(Amada McBroom)

BETTE MIDLER ATLANTIC3656

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 1) “FUNKYTOWN”

(Steve Greenberg)

LIPPS, INC.CASABLANCA2233

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“COMING UP (Live At Glasgow)”

 (Paul McCartney)

 

Flip-Side

“COMING UP” (From McCartney II)

“Lunch Box / Odd Sox”

PAUL McCARTNEY & WINGS

COLUMBIA RECORDS11263

Produced by: Paul McCartney

 

This Week’s No. 1 song on the Hot 100 was “Coming Up (Live At Glasgow)” from Paul McCartney & Wings. Columbia Records wanted this version on his McCartney II Lp, but Macca resisted, insisting this album was a solo venture, and didn’t want Wings on it. So, Columbia included it as the B side to the studio version of “Coming Up” on the 45 RPM release, along with another track called “Lunch Box / Odd Sox.” Initially, the studio track of “Coming Up” was getting promoted, but radio stations (including the one I was on at the time) flipped the single over and played the much more Rock-sounding live track. Let’s listen to the studio cut first; which Paul thought was the stronger version for the record company to promote.

That was the opening track on McCartney II. Now, let’s hear the live version of the same song that not only received the most airplay, but put the song into the annals of Rock & Roll history as Paul McCartney’s first No. 1 song in the 1980’s.

As an added bonus, here’s McCartney & Wings at the Concert for Kampuchea recorded live in London on December 29, 1979. This was included in the double album Concerts for the People of Kampuchea (Cambodia) on Atlantic Records also featured artists like: the Who, the Pretenders, Elvis Costello & the Attractions, Queen, the Clash and others.  

The song “Coming Up” reportedly caused John Lennon to begin recording again after he heard the Paul’s song. “Coming Up (Live At Glasgow)” was recorded in Scotland on December 17, 1979 at a music venue called The Apollo. That building was demolished in 1987 after it fell into disrepair. 

 

TOP 50

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

 

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

“LET ME LOVE YOU TONIGHT”

(Jeff Wilson / Dan Greer / Steve Woodward)

Flip-Side

Janny Lou”

PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE

CASABLANCA RECORDS2266


Produced by: John Ryan

The Country-Rock band Pure Prairie League from Ohio had their first and only No. 1 Adult Contemporary survey hit with “Let Me Love You Tonight” this week in 1980. The single was taken from the album Firin’ Up on Casablanca Records—mostly known as a Disco label! But the early ‘80s was a time when, what are known as “AC” radio stations, began playing a lot of Country-sounding songs mixed into their playlists. You may remember the soundtrack to the film Urban Cowboy would soon become a huge success not just with Country audiences, but Adult Contemporary and even Top 40 record-buyers as well after the success of the movie. Pure Prairie League was named after a fictional name of a temperance union in the Errol Flynn movie from 1939 called Dodge City. The co-founder of the band, original drummer Tommy McGrail is said to have come up with the name in 1970. Here’s this week’s No. 1 song on the Top 50 Adult Contemporary list with “Let Me Love You Tonight” featuring their new lead singer, Vince Gill. Yes, that’s the future Country star on the lead vocals.

“Let Me Love You Tonight” also featured the then hot saxophone-sound of David Sanborn. The song peaked at No. 10 on the Hot 100 Singles chart as well. Let’s go back for a moment, as Pure Prairie League’s first national success came after they were first popular in the Cincinnati area. They recorded the song “Amie” for their second LP called Bustin’ Out on RCA Victor Records. But the band took a tailspin after that LP; as Craig Fuller (their then lead singer and guitar player) was arrested for draft evasion and was in the penitentiary for six months. RCA Victor dropped the band. Flash-forward to 1973, and Michael Riley, the group’s new front man and bass player, brought in a new guitarist and vocalist named Larry Goshorn to take the place of Fuller. They continued to perform with various new members over time with a rigorous schedule; and while on these tours, the song “Amie” got rave reaction. Flash ahead again to 1975; radio stations began getting tons of requests for the song “Amie,” already a nearly three year-old song, because they had heard it at concerts. I recall really enjoying playing the song on the radio and during a “Country-Rock” night at a Jersey Shore nightclub. The crowd loved it. Here’s a Big Jay Bonus Track…the long version of “Amie” from the ‘72 album, Bustin’ Out, featuring the lead vocals of that draft dodger, Craig Fuller.  

“Amie” reached a national peak position of No. 27 on the Hot 100 and was quite popular in some sections of the U.S. in ’75; proving that a great song is a great song, even if it doesn’t make it the first time around.

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80

 

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“TAKE YOUR TIME (Do It Right) Pt. 1”

 

(Harold Clayton / Umunto Sigidi)

Flip-Side

“TAKE YOUR TIME (Do It Right) Part 2”

THE

S.O.S. BAND

TABU RECORDS (CBS RECORDS) – 5522

  

Produced by Umunto Sigidi    Arranged by: Fred Wesley, S.O.S. and Umunto Sigidi

This record sold over two-million copies and never made it to No. 1 on the Hot 100. It stalled at No. 3 for two survey-periods. But on the Hot Soul Single special survey, “Take Your Time (Do It Right) Part 1” was a stone-cold dance smash. It was also No. 1 this week in the New York City clubs and on the National Disco Top 100 chart. The Atlanta-based Funk-R&B-Disco group originally called Santa Monica, featured female lead singer Mary Davis on keyboards, James Earl Jones III on drums, John Simpson on bass, Jason Bryant on keyboards Bruno Speight on guitar, plus they had a sax player named Willie Killebrew and carried around a flute player named Bill Ellis. Here’s one of the biggest hits of 1980, “Take Your Time (Do It Right) Part 1” from the S.O.S. Band on Tabu Records.

This was the first of five continuous survey-cycles as the biggest Soul chart hit in America for the S.O.S. Band. The group needed to send out their OWN S.O.S. to top the success of their major smash; and the never fully got it. S.O.S. stood for “Sounds Of Success.” But, in fact, it took the band over three years to have another Pop chart hit; this time written and produced by Jimmy Jam Harris and Terry Lewis. While the S.O.S. Band did have some decent-sized R&B hits, including: “S.O.S. (Dit Dit Dit Dash Dash Dash Dit Dit Dit)” (No. 20 Soul) in 1980, “Just Be Good To Me” in ’83 (No. 2 Soul & No. 55 Pop) and “The Finest” in ’86 (No. 2 Soul & No. 44 Pop) featuring vocals by Mary Davis along with the then red-hot Alexander O’Neal, they never hit the Hot 100 again, even with having those superstars of songwriting and production trying to rescue them. 

 

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JUNE 28, 1980

 

TOP

LPS & Tape

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

GLASS HOUSES

BILLY JOEL

COLUMBIA RECORDS36384

Produced by: Phil Ramone

Glass Houses, Billy Joel’s seventh studio album, was in the third week of an eventual six survey-periods in the pinnacle position on the Top LPs & Tape chart this week in 1980. This album was huge in the U.S., selling over seven million copies. It became the fourth biggest album of the year, and garnered Billy a Grammy® for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance. This album, unlike his previous efforts, had a more true Rock feel to it, catapulting Joel into finding a new audience that may have seen him as a lounge singer. Perhaps he will always be known as a lounge singer, but he you must admit that venues like the former Shea Stadium and Madison Square Garden are BIG lounges. The lead single from Glass Houses started out with the sound of breaking glass and banging out “You May Be Right” (No. 7 Pop) followed by a rush-release just over two months later with a soon to be No. 1 song, “It’s Still Rock And Roll To Me.”

Remember, “New-Wave” was the rage around this time, and Billy’s stab at sounding a bit more “Post-Modern” worked for the mass audience with “It’s Still Rock And Roll To Me.” The follow-up single to that 45 RPM was the mid-tempo “Don’t Ask Me Why” (No. 19 Pop) followed by another rocker, “Sometimes A Fantasy” (No. 36 Pop) in the fall of ’80. Glass Houses was nominated (but didn’t win) a Grammy® for Album of the Year, which went to Christopher Cross ’ debut LP, produced by Michael Omartian. Joel and Phil Ramone had won the prize the year before for the album 52nd Street. Glass Houses acquired the Favorite Pop/Rock Album statue from the American Music Awards.  

 

 SOUL

LPS

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘80:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

LET’S GET SERIOUS

JERMAINE JACKSON

MOTOWN RECORDSM7-928R1

 

Certain tracks Produced by: Jermaine Jackson & Stevie Wonder
Executive Producers: Hazel G. Jackson & Berry Gordy, Jr.

Jermaine Jackson had worked with Stevie Wonder in the past, when the Jackson 5 had done background vocals for his 1974 hit “You Haven’t Done Nothin,” (No. 1 Soul & No. No. 1 Pop) with the brothers Jackson providing the “DOO-DOO-WOPSssss” included on the album Fullfillingness’ First Finale. Flash-forward to 1980, and Jermaine Jackson not only had the No. 1 Soul Single in the nation for the six consecutive prior weeks (to this one) with “Let’s Get Serious,” but he had the biggest Soul LP again during this survey-stage also called Let’s Get Serious with some serious help from Wonder. This was the fourth of an ultimate five weeks as the hottest Soul LP in America. So let’s feature that relentless hit from Jermaine; co-written by Stevie Wonder and his writing partner Lee Garrett.

That co-writer of “Let’s Get Serious”—Lee Garrett—was a co-writer with Stevie Wonder, Syreeta Wright and Stevie’s mom, Lulu Hardaway on his legendary hit “Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours” back in the summer of 1970. The album version of “Let’s Get Serious” was a glorious 8:05 of glorious funk produced by Stevie and Jermaine. The shorter 45 RPM version reached No. 9 on the Hot 100 and No. 2 on the Disco 100 survey. The follow-up single took four months to be released by Motown; this one written by Stevie Wonder all by himself, another of his productions called “You’re Supposed To Keep Your Love For Me.” That track got to No. 34 on the Hot 100, and only No. 32 on the Soul Singles listing. Jermaine had originally recorded that cut in 1975, but after Michael and the rest of Jermaine’s brothers bolted Motown for Epic Records as the Jacksons, he and Wonder erased the vocal tracks of the other Jackson family members and overdubbed their own backing vocals. Jermaine Jackson is now known as Jermaine Jacksun, after legally changing his name. (**See more about the Jackson 5 above.)

Have a super week &

BE BIG!

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.
(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


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