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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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June 19th, 2015

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

June 26, 1965

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 15) “SEVENTH SON”

(Willie Dixon)

JOHNNY RIVERS IMPERIAL66112  

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 7) “HELP ME RHONDA”

(Brian Wilson)

THE BEACH BOYS CAPITOL5395

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 10) “HUSH, HUSH, SWEET CHARLOTTE”  

(Mack David / Frank DeVol)

PATTI PAGE COLUMBIA 43251

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 9) “FOR YOUR LOVE  

(Graham Gouldman)

THE YARDBIRDS EPIC – 9790   

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 4) “CRYING IN THE CHAPEL”

(Artie Glenn)

ELVIS PRESLEY

with the Jordanaires RCA VICTOR447- 0643

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 6) “WONDERFUL WORLD” 

(Sam Cooke / Lou Alder / Herb Alpert)

HERMAN’S HERMITS MGM13354

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 26) “(I Can’t Get No) SATISFACTION” 

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richard)

THE ROLLING STONES LONDON9766

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “WOOLY BULLY”

(Domingo Samudio)

SAM THE SHAM AND THE PHAROHS MGM13322

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 1) “I CAN’T HELP MYSELF”

(Eddie Holland, Lamont Dozier / Brian Holland)

FOUR TOPS CAPITOL 1076

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“MR. TAMBOURINE MAN”

 (Bob Dylan)

Flip-Side:

“I KNEW I’D WANT YOU”

THE BYRDS

COLUMBIA RECORDS43271

 

Although Billboard called them “Folk/Pop,” these guys were one of the first to actually be playing what was quickly dubbed “Fold/Rock.” The Byrds, a five-man band based in Los Angeles, appeared on the TV show HULLABALOO on May 11, 1965 (with Frankie Avalon hosting) singing their recently released hit, a truncated version of Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man.” But the only member playing an instrument on the original recording was the guy with tinted “Granny” glasses, Roger (then known as Jim) McGuinn on 12-string electric guitar. The guitar he performed with on the session with “The Wrecking Crew” (as they would later be called) was influenced by George Harrison using a Rickenbacker model 360-12 during the filming (and recordings) for the film A Hard Day’s Night almost a year before. Roger (Jim) McGuinn reportedly bought his own 360-12 in 1964, but later sent it back to the factory to have modifications done to it with another treble pick-up added. That refurbished guitar was called the Rickenbacker model 370-12. While on tour in 1966, McGuinn’s modified 12-stringed instrument was stolen from the stage after a concert at Fordham University in New York. According to a published report, the guitar mysteriously reappeared years later after the statute of limitations prevented any criminal charges being filed. McGuinn got friendly with the “quiet” Beatle, and even allowed him to play the guitar Harrison played in ’64. Here is McGuinn playing those famous opening notes on “Mr. Tambourine Man”—No. 1 for this week only in 1965.

You’ll notice in that video that you really only could hear McGuinn singing in the beginning. But later, someone in the control room woke up and got David Crosby’s mic turned on. This 45 RPM was the first No. 1 record on the Hot 100 since “Go Away Little Girl” by Steve Lawrence topped the chart in January, 1963! The label had been reluctant to record so-called “Rock & Roll” up until that point, but changed their minds with the success of the Byrds. McGuinn has said he added a classical element to the opening notes to “Mr. Tambourine Man,” claiming it was loosely based on Bach’s “Jesu, Joy Of Man’s Desiring!” Wow. Even I never knew that until researching this segment. The rest of the Byrds consisted of Gene Clark on tambourine and vocals (although he was an accomplished guitar player and spectacular songwriter) Chris Hillman on bass, guitars and vocals along with drummer Michael Clarke. Recommended to be signed by Columbia Records by Jazz musician Miles Davis, the Byrds only sang the vocals on the original recording, as their new producer Terry Melcher decided the ensemble was not quite ready to play instrumentation on that first session for the single. That situation changed quickly when it became time to record most of the other tracks on their debut LP, contrary to most erroneous reports. The take of “Mr. Tambourine Man” we all know and love was recorded in L.A. at the Columbia Studios on January 20, 1965 with the now famous studio cats lead by Hal Blaine on drums (he later called them “The Wrecking Crew”) Larry Knechtel on bass (he is the same guy who played the unforgettable piano passages on the song “Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Simon & Garfunkel) Jerry Cole on electric guitar along with the later well-known studio musician Leon Russell on electric piano. Jerry (Jerald Kolbrak) Cole actually was the leader of the pit musicians on several TV shows including Hullabaloo. He died in 2008. Larry Knechtel later played the bass for the Doors, as they never had an official bass guitar player in that group. In addition to his piano playing for Simon & Garfunkel’s masterwork, Knechtel was a member of Bread in the ‘70s (with David Gates) and played the searing guitar solo on the song “The Guitar Man.” The extremely talented musician died in 2009. “Mr. Tambourine Man” was released on April 12, 1965 and replaced “I Can’t Help Myself” by Four Tops in the chief slot for a sole week, only to be subplanted by the Motown act the following week. But even that didn’t last long; as the Rolling Stones were waiting in the wings in another week to obliterate every other 45 RPM in its path with “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.”  In January of 1991, the original five Byrds were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Gene (real name Harold Eugene) Clark sadly died later that year of heart failure. Michael (real name Michael James Dick) Clarke died in 1993. Jim McGuinn still performs sporadically. Chris Hillman continues to perform with various musicians and we all know about David Crosby’s musical and other much publicized human frailties.   

 

   TOP 40

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“CRYING IN THE CHAPEL 

(Artie Glenn) 

Flip-Side:

“I BELIEVE IN THE MAN IN THE SKY”

 

ELVIS PRESLEY

with the Jordanaires

RCA VICTOR RECORDS447-0643 

Anyone who knows the history of Elvis Presley knows that he was a lover of American Gospel music. The King of Rock & Roll recorded a Gospel album called His Hand In Mine in just two days in Nashville, Tennessee in the RCA Studio B near the end of 1960. Though not his first Gospel recordings (he had an EP called Peace In The Valley released in April of 1957 recorded in Hollywood) His Hand In Mine included 12 tracks, including the song “I Believe In The Man In The Sky.” However, another song recorded on the second day of that session (October 31, 1960) when Presley placed on tape his exquisite rendition of “Crying In The Chapel.”

 

The song was written by a guy named Artie Glenn who wrote it for his son Darrell Glenn with his group the Rhythm Riders. That original 1953 version was a No. 1 45 RPM on the Cashbox Singles chart, No. 6 in Billboard and No. 4 on the Country/Western listing as well. Here’s the original.

There were several successful cover versions made at the time, including one by June Valli that reached No. 4. She was later one of the voices on the Chiquita Banana commercials. The song was also covered in ’53 by the R&B group called the Orioles, which is a fantastic version originally on Jubilee Records; my favorite version.

Now back to the reason for this entry—the Elvis version. RCA Victor decided to hold the song “Crying In The Chapel” for release until almost four and a half years after it was recorded not long after his release from the U.S. Army in 1960; putting it out as a so-called “Easter” single. Most people didn’t realize that his record company had been releasing older Presley recordings for quite some time. But this one eventually sold over two million copies; Elvis’ first 45 RPM to do so since “Return To Sender” (No. 2 Pop) in 1962. And “Crying In The Chapel” happened right smack dab in the middle of the “British Invasion” that abruptly destroyed many careers of previous Pop music stalwarts. Presley did have other hits during the mid-‘60s, but this was his highest charting Hot 100 hit at No. 3 (this week No. 6) since “(You’re The) Devil In Disguise” reached No. 3 for two survey-phases in ’63—all the way up to when his 1969 single “In The Ghetto” got to No. 3—also selling over two million copies. Presley recorded two more Gospel albums in his lifetime, including 1967’s How Great Thou Art, which included “Crying In The Chapel,” by then almost seven years old.

 

BEST SELLING

RHYTHM & BLUES  SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“I CAN’T HELP MYSELF”

(Eddie Holland / Lamont Dozier / Bryan Holland) 

Flip-Side:

“SAD SOUVENIRS”

 

FOUR TOPS

MOTOWN RECORDS1076

This week in ’65 was the fourth of an astounding nine concluding weeks of reaching the zenith on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles “special survey” for “I Can’t Help Myself,” sometime shown in other countries as “I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)” on Motown Records. The song was featured on the LP Four Tops’ Second Album which contained the similar-sounding follow-up single “It’s The Same Old Song” (hurriedly written, recorded and released as their old record company—Columbia—released an older recording trying to capitalize on their new success) and another single released later in ’65 called “Something About You.” But here’s the song that made Four Tops a household name and helped cement “The Sound of Young America.”

“I Can’t Help Myself” featured not only the “Funk Brothers” (the Motown studio cats) but the string section of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra; plus the added vocal adornment of Motown’s hard-working, bur rarely acknowledged female backing vocal group the Andantes. The song (currently dropping down to No. 2) had been the biggest hit on the Hot 100 Singles chart last week (“Mr. Tambourine Man” was on top of that listing this week) and would be again during the next survey-cycle during June, ’65. “I Can’t Help Myself” was another masterpiece by the hit songwriting and production team of Holland-Dozier-Holland. It was listed as the second biggest hit of 1965 after “Wooly Bully” by Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs—which was never a No. 1 single! But the best was yet to come for the guys from the Motor City, as Four Tops’ biggest chart hit would come just over a year later from the pens and production prowess of H-D-H; cementing their later induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (1990) the Rhythm & Blues Pioneers Award (1997) the Vocal Group Hall of Fame (1999) and the Grammy® Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009 among others.  

 

 THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

June 26, 1965

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

(Walt Disney Presents the Soundtrack of)

MARY POPPINS

Julie Andrews,

Dick Van Dyke,

David Tomlinson, Glynis Johns and Ed Wynn 

BUENA VISTA RECORDS4026 

The origin of Walt Disney’s fancy to make a motion picture account of the book Mary Poppins happened as early as 1939, when he saw his daughter taking pleasure in reading the work of fiction. He began discussions not long afterward with author P. L. Travers to get rights to the manuscript, and was finally successful after frequent tries in 1961. Disney then commissioned a pair of composers—Richard M. Sherman and his brother Robert B. Sherman to write songs for what Walt visualized as a musical. With many alterations made, Disney’s film project was freely based on the book, with a screenplay penned by Bill Walsh and Don DaGradi. The movie was released on August 27, 1964 and ultimately received 11 Oscar® nominations, with five wins for: Best Actress for Julie Andrews, Best Original Music Score, Best Visual Effects, Best Film Editing, and Best Original Song for "Chim Chim Cher-ee,” as sung by Dick Van Dyke (as Bert) along with the children who played Jane and Michael Banks—Karen Dotrice and Matthew Garber respectively.  

The Mary Poppins Soundtrack also won Grammy® Awards for Best Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or Television Show and for Best Recording for Children. This week in ’65, the Mary Poppins Soundtrack was the No. 1 album in America for the 13th of an eventual 14 non-consecutive survey-periods. It had been No. 1 for the week ending on March 13th, and had a 13-week run at the high point of the Top LPs chart from the week ending April 10th through the survey-phase finishing on July 3rd. Up to this point, the soundtrack was on the Top LPs chart for 39 weeks. It was decided that Walt Disney Records would become Buena Vista Records in 1959 to not only accelerate the progress of the singing livelihood of former Mouseketeer and budding star Annette Funicello, but also to be the recording label for sountracks to the studio’s motion-pictures and other current Pop releases. Mary Poppins was the biggest movie hit of the year in ‘65. The most recognized tracks on the soundtrack are “A Spoon Full Of Sugar,” “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” and the above “Chim Chim Cher-ee.” The DVD version of Mary Poppins was the very first Digital Video Disc released by Walt Disney Studios in 1998.  


 

HOT R&B

LPs

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

THE TEMPTIONS SING SMOKEY

The Temptations

 GORDY RECORDS912 

He was the focal point of this album, but truth be told, it wasn’t JUST “Smokey” that the Temptations were singing, as Robinson typically had a collaborator helping him compose the music for songs. “My Girl” had previously been a No. 1 Pop (one week) and R&B smash (six weeks) by the Temptations; ending up being a two-million-selling 45 RPM for Gordy (Motown) Records. William “Smokey” Robinson had written “My Girl” along with Miracles member Ronald “Ronnie” White. They had vocalized together since before they were teenagers in the Motor City. The follow-up and second single from the LP Temptations Sing Smokey called “It’s Growing” had debuted at No. 77 on the Hot 100 for the week ending on April 3rd, it was currently sitting in the No. 48 slot after peaking at No. 18. On the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles listing, it had slipped back down to No. 29 this week at the end of its run. Now, while “It’s Growing” was no “My Girl,” it did decent numbers for the Temptations. Here’s “It’s Growing,” co-written by another Miracles member Warren “Pete” Moore; that group’s vocal arranger.

The B side of “It’s Growing” was also on the album, with the title “What Love Has Joined Together.” Other signature Smokey tunes on this Temptations LP included remakes of “You’ve Really Got A Hold On Me” (a Miracles hit in late ’62) and “You Beat Me To The Punch” a ‘62 No. 1 R&B hit for Mary Wells. Smokey remained the Temptations’ producer through the end of ’65; replaced by Norman Whitfield at the demand of Motown owner, Berry Gordy, Jr. due to Robinson’s growing role as Gordy’s right hand man at Motown. It was Gordy himself who wrote the extensive liner notes on this album, which was seen as The Temptations Sing Smokey on the front and back cover, but as just Temptations Sing Smokey on the actual vinyl labels—from which I usually ascertain as the true title of a record. So despite owning songwriting acknowledgment with others, it was decided to advance Smokey over any of his co-writers.

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JUNE 23, 1979

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 12) “YOU TAKE MY BREATH AWAY”

(From the Movie “SOONER OR LATER”

(Stephen Lawrence / Bruce Hart)

REX SMITH COLUMBIA10908

 ***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 10) “BOOGIE WONDERLAND”

(Jon Lind / Allee Willis)

EARTH, WIND & FIRE with the EMOTIONS ARC10956

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 8) “SHE BELIEVES IN ME”  

(Steve Gibb)

KENNY ROGERS UNITED ARTISTS1273

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 7) “CHUCK E.’S IN LOVE

(Rickie Lee Jones)

RICKIE LEE JONESWARNER BROS.8825

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 6) “THE LOGICAL SONG”

(Rick Davies / Roger Hodgson)

SUPERTRAMP A&M2128

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 11) “BAD GIRLS” 

(Donna Summer / Bruce Sudano / Eddie Hokenson / Joe Esposito)

DONNA SUMMER CASABLANCA988

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “JUST WHEN I NEEDED YOU MOST”

(Randy Vanwarmer)

RANDY VANWARMER BEARSVILLE 0334

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “RING MY BELL”

(Frederick Knight)

ANITA WARD JUANA3422

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 2) “WE ARE FAMILY”

(Nile Rogers / Bernard Edwards)

SISTER SLEDGE COTILLION44251

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“HOT STUFF”

 (Pete Bellotte / Harold Faltermeyer /  Keith Forsey)

Flip-Side:

“JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF YOUR HEART”

CASABLANCA RECORDS978

 

 

It was a HOT week for women; in particular women who recorded disco grooves. The number one Pop single in America this week in 1979 was “Hot Stuff” by Donna Summer, who also had the number one Pop LP, Bad Girls. The top Soul single was from newcomer Anita Ward with “Ring My Bell. And the top Soul Album was We Are Family from Sister Sledge.

Donna Summer was crowned the true Queen of Disco hesitantly the Princess of Rock as well with her best-selling album, Bad Girls on Casablanca Records. The track “Hot Stuff” had been on crest of the Pop singles chart for one survey-cycle a couple of weeks back, replaced for a solo week by the Bee Gees with “Love You Inside Out.” Donna came roaring back with the song that to be sure was too HOT for second place. This was the end of three non-consecutive seven-day survey-cycles as the Pop singles chart-topping record. A pair of weeks after the run of “Hot Stuff” her title track from Bad Girls would have its go around there for a still longer five weeks! The double album Bad Girls was at the summit of the Top LPs & Tape register last week, and (after a two-week run by Supertramp with Breakfast in America) would return the apex of that inventory of albums for an additional five weeks; in the long run selling over three million copies in the U.S. alone. The single “Hot Stuff” featured the guitar of Jeff “Skunk” Baxter, a one-time member of two major U.S. bands—first Steely Dan and then the Doobie Brothers. It was this rock-leaning thought process that got “Hot Stuff” nominated and then winning the Grammy® Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance.

There had been a disco backlash that Donna Summers’ producers Giorgio Moroder and Pete Bellotte realized, and asked songwriters Pete Bellotte, Harold Faltermeyer and Keith Forsey to give it a “rock” feel. Much to the chagrin of “disco-sucks” populace, the production resonated with a mass audience. The head of Casablanca Records, Neil Bogart almost gave “Hot Stuff” away to then label-mate Cher, but changed his mind after Donna Summer insisted on singing it. That was a good thing, as Donna’s single sold over two million copies! Sorrowfully, Donna died on May 17, 2012. 

 

TOP 50

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

 

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“SHADOWS IN THE MOONLIGHT”

(Rory Bourke / Charlie Black)

Flip-Side

“YUCATAN CAFE”

ANNE MURRAY

CAPITOL RECORDS4716

The second single from Anne Murray’s latest album in ’79 called New Kind Of Feeling was the No. 1 song on the Top 50 Adult Contemporary Singles chart this week; “Shadows In The Moonlight.” This Capitol Records release would also later become Murray’s third chart-topping 45 RPM on the Hot Country Singles chart in July of ’79 for one survey-period. But “Shadows In The Moonlight” was another Country-Crossover as they were called at the time that made strong inroads on the Top 50 Adult Contemporary listing. Here’s a live version with the Boston Pops Orchestra.

Morna (real first name) Anne Murray was still riding the wave of her only No. 1 song on the Hot 100 Singles chart in 1978 called “You Needed Me,” and ’79 was a red-hot year for the Canadian native. The follow-up to “You Needed Me” to open ’79 was “I Just Fall In Love Again” (No. 12 Pop, No. 1 Adult Contemporary and No. 1 Country) followed by this week’s featured song, and “Broken Hearted Me” (No. 12 Pop, No. 1 A/C and No. 1 Country) giving her much TV exposure as well. Remember, by this point, Anne Murray had been having hits in Canada and the U.S. for nine years since her hit record “Snowbird” sold a million and reached No. 8 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 on the then called Easy Listening Singles chart. Anne Murray’s last entry into the Hot 100 was in ’86 with “Now And Forever (You And Me)” which was a dud at No. 92 on the Pop chart, but went to No. 1 on the Hot Country Singles list that year. Her biggest success in the ‘80s was in the Country field when she won a Grammy® Award in 1980 Best Female Country Vocal for “Could I Have This Dance,” and won another Grammy® in ’83 for Best Country Female Vocal with the album and song “A Little Good News” plus won the Country Music Association’s Single of the Year award for the same record. Murray is in the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame and Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. Anne’s former husband, record producer Bill Langstroth died in 2013. Murray stopped touring in 2008.

    

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“RING MY BELL”

(Frederick Knight)

Flip-Side

“IF I COULD FEEL THAT OLD FEELLING AGAIN”

ANITA WARD

JUANA RECORDS3442

Dance music (or Disco as it was still being called in many quarters) was hot almost everywhere in ‘79. The Hot Soul Singles survey-topping song this week came from a Memphis, Tennessee-born school teacher turned singer, Anita Ward with “Ring My Bell.” The record was No. 2 this week on the Disco Top 80 Chart, which was being led by EVERY song on Donna Summer’s current album Bad Girls in the No. 1 position! The song “Ring My Bell” was written a year prior by Frederick Knight, who had a decent-sized Pop (No. 27) and R&B (No. 8) hit with “I’ve Been Loving You For So Long” in ’72; who appeared at the acclaimed Wattstax Music Festival in Los Angeles along with other Stax/Volt Records stars the following year. “Ring My Bell” was enjoying its second of an ultimate five back-to-back weeks as the prime 45 RPM on the Hot Soul Single chart this week in ’79. Here’s Anita Ward’s One-Hit-Wonder.

Frederick Knight had written the song for a 12 year-old Stacy Lattisaw as a juvenile-sounding tune for a young girl to perform as if she was talking on the telephone. She ended up not signing a recording deal with producer/songwriter Knight, who later gave the song to Ward when she was recording for his label called Juana Records (affiliated with Miami’s TK Records.) Ward didn’t like the song, but agreed to record it if it had more adult wording. It still was a rather simple song, but the strong rhythm track was punctuated by a drum synthesizer. Anita Ward’s career fizzled after her follow-up single “Don’t Drop My Love” stalled at No. 87 on the Hot 100.

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JUNE 23, 1979

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

BREAKFAST IN AMERICA

SUPERTRAMP

A&M RECORDS3708

The top charting LP this week in ’79 belonged to Supertramp, with Breakfast In America on A&M Records. The band was originally called Daddy, which would later be renamed Supertramp, inspired by the 1938 book Autobiography of a Supertramp by R.H. Davies. The front of the album features what looks like New York City as it would appear from an aerial point of view. They would receive a Grammy® for “Best Recording Package. The LP featured three hits, “The Logical Song”, “Goodbye Stranger” and “Take The Long Way Home.” Here’s the first single from Breakfast In America, “The Logical Song” in its album length version.


 The shortened single version of “The Logical Song” was at its peak on the Hot 100 last week and this current survey-period at No. 6; Supertramp’s biggest charting single in the U.S.A. Supertramp first arrived in the minds of American rock lovers in 1975 with their 45 RPM “Bloody Well Right.” Over here in the colonies, we didn’t realize that the word “bloody” was a curse over in Blighty. That single got to No. 35 on the Hot 100. Their next record is still a favorite by Classic Rock lovers; even reaching No. 15 on the Hot 100 with “Give A Little Bit.” The song has been used in TV commercials in various forms. After the Breakfast In America LP and its three hit singles, Supertramp were able to have a couple more Top 15 Pop hits with a live version of “Dreamer” (No. 15) and their last major hit, “It’s Raining Again” (No. 11) in 1982. Their last charting single in the U.S. was “Cannonball” as a kind of comeback in ’85, reaching No. 28 on the Hot 100, which did well on Rock radio. Yet, almost oddly, Supertramp showed up with a No. 1 Dance chart hit in 1987 with a song titled “I’m Beggin’ You.” The on again-off again Supertramp is set to tour yet again later this year in London and Amsterdam dates announced thus far. Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies don’t see eye-to-eye, so Hodgson continues to tour with his own band, and as the most recognized voice of Supertramp, still performs the hits he helped make famous.

 

SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

 

BAD GIRLS

DONNA SUMMER

 CASABLANCA RECORDS7150

The Queen of Disco earned her crown with this album, although she had been a Disco Diva already with previous releases. The LP Bad Girls on Casablanca Records had been No. 1 on the Top LPs & Tape chart for one week, ending on June 16th, but reappeared at the peak of the listing for an addition five weeks (this being the third overall) after losing the spot to Supertramp’s Breakfast In America for two. During this survey-period, Bad Girls, the double disc set was in the prime position on the Soul LPs chart, climbing from No. 2 last week. This double-album not only featured the current No. 1 Hot 100 Singles chart leader “Hot Stuff,” (**see above) and the soon to be No. 1 record, “Bad Girls”—but yielded yet another million-selling single waiting in the wings—“Dim All The Lights.”

I hope you enjoyed watching a turntable spinning the 12-inch mix for over seven minutes as seen above. “Dim All The Lights” reached No. 2 on the Hot 100 Singles chart in the fall of ’79 and was written alone by Donna.

 


 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JUNE 22, 1985

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘85:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 13) “THE SEARCH IS OVER”

(Frankie Sullivan / Jim Peterik)

SURVIVOR SCOTTI BROTHERS04871

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 10) “‘WALKING ON SUNSHINE”

(Kimberly Rew)

KATRINA AND THE WAVES CAPITOL5466

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 5) “THINGS CAN ONLY GET BETTER”  

(Howard Jones)

HOWARD JONES ELEKTRA69651

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 7) “IN MY HOUSE  

(Rick James)

MARY JANE GIRLS GORDY 1741

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 9) “ANGEL

(Madonna / Steve Bray)

MADONNA SIRE29008

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 12) “A VIEW TO A KILL” 

(John Barry / Simon LeBon / Nick Rhodes /             John Taylor)

DURAN DURAN CAPITOL5475

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 11) “RASPBERRY BERET” 

(Prince)

PRINCE & the Revolution PAISLEY PARK28972

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 1) “EVERYBODY WANTS TO RULE THE WORLD”

(Roland Orzabal / Ian Stanley / Chris Hughes)

TEARS FOR FEARS MERCURY880659

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 6) “SUSSUDIO”

(Phil Collins)

PHIL COLLINSATLANTIC89560

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“HEAVEN”

 (Bryan Adams / Jim Vallance)

Flip-Side

“HEAVEN - LIVE”

BRYAN ADAMS

A&M RECORDS2729

 

This week’s No. 1 record on the Hot 100 Singles chronicle pop first showed up in 1983 on a soundtrack album for the movie A Night In Heaven, starring Christopher Atkins as a male stripper, Lesley Ann Warren as a college professor and dancer Deney Terrio as, well…who cares. Hey, any movie with Dance Fever’s Deney Terrio in it couldn’t have been that good—no offense Deney. Wait—ok, you were in Star Trek II: Wrath Of Khan, so you get a pass.  “Heaven” got some radio airplay the first time around (I remember adding it to my radio station’s playlist when I was a program director and the audience liked it) but it didn’t gain much national steam as an LP cut. As I remember, people still kept asking for it on request lines, so I continued to play the song now and then for over a year, as did a handful of other stations across the country. Let’s back up a bit. Adams had just come off having a No. 15 Pop hit with “Cuts Like A Knife” and was invited to write a song for the movie. Reluctantly (because he didn’t like the script) Adams and his co-writer Jim Vallance cranked out the song in a small basement studio in one evening, recording a demo for the producers of the film. The suits loved it. Bryan was still not sold on even the idea of this motion picture. But, as a favor to the co-owner of A&M Records, Jerry Moss, he indeed recorded a new version after seeing a rough cut of the film; still not diggin’ the scene. It turns out Adams was correct about the flick, as it was a complete bomb, soon to be forgotten. So, A&M released a single from Bryan called “This Time”—and while it reached No. 24 on the Hot 100, it wasn’t the blockbuster he’d need to become a star. The record company did recognize his talent (and so did the public) and A&M released two initial singles off of his new album Reckless. First came the rocker, “Run To You” (No. 6 Pop) and then in early ’85 the song “Somebody” reached No. 11 Pop. “Heaven” was also put on Reckless, much to the chagrin of a still skeptical Bryan Adams. But sometimes, certain songs find a way of getting into the minds of music consumers. A few programmers practically begged A&M to release it as a single, as they knew it was a great song. And the moment A&M finally placed the song on a 45 RPM, “Heaven” (as the third single on Adams’ Reckless) took off—even if Bryan Adams himself was STILL reluctant. This time, Bryan was incorrect.

This was the first of two survey-sequences in the prime slot on the Hot 100 this week in 1985, as “Heaven” became a huge hit a year and a half after first appearing on that horrible movie’s soundtrack. But, that’s the power of persistent radio air-play by smart programmers who stumble on great songs and give them a chance, including yours truly. You’ve got to pay attention to your audience as we’re a match made in heaven!  

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘85

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 4)

 

“THE

SEARCH IS OVER”

(Frankie Sullivan / Jim Peterik)

Flip-Side

“IT’S THE SINGER NOT THE SONG”

SURVIVOR

SCOTTI BROTHERS RECORDS04871

Replacing “Axel F” (Harold Faltermeyer’s theme song) from the motion-picture Beverly Hills Cop as the biggest record on the Hot Adult Contemporary singles listing, was from the same guys who had success with another film’s theme song (Rocky III) the two-million-selling (No. 1 Pop) “Eye Of The Tiger.” Only this time, Survivor didn’t need a film to carry their hit song. “The Search Is Over” on Scotti Brothers Records made it on its own merits. Their previous two 45 RPM releases from the album Vital Signs were hit songs on the Hot 100; “I Can’t Hold Back” (No. 13 Pop) and “High On You” (No. 8 Pop) brought the band back to prominence after over a year of a drought. Single number three from the album was the biggest of the trio of 45’s from the set. “The Search Is Over” (as well as the first two singles) featured a new lead singer in Survivor; Jimi Jamison who had replaced “Eye Of The Tiger” singer Dave Bickler.

“The Search Is Over” was written by guitarist Frankie Sullivan and Survivor’s founder, Jim Peterik, formerly the lead singer of 1970’s “Vehicle” (No. 2 Pop) from the Chicago-area band The Ides Of March. “The Search Is Over” was brought to life after Peterik penciled the phrase into a notebook, and wrote a story around it. It reached a respectable No. 4 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, and was in the first of four back-to-back weeks at the pinnacle of the Hot Adult Contemporary listing this week in ‘85. Survivor had a couple more Top 10 Pop hits left in them after “The Search Is Over,” including: “Burning Heart” (No. 2 Pop) and another song featured in a Sylvester Stallone film, Rocky IV, and their final Top 40 hit, “Is This Love” (No. 9 Pop) in ‘early ’87. Their next releases flopped and the band broke up. Some feeble attempts at making hit records ensued. The chart success of Survivor was over, but in 2013, it was announced by Sullivan that the original lead singer Dave Bickler and his replacement Jimi Jamison would rejoin the band for a tour. It never happened as Jamison was found dead due to what was originally reported to be a heart attack; but an autopsy subsequently found that he had a hemorrhage brain stroke, with what was described as “acute methamphetamine intoxication contributing.” Jamison was 62 at the time of his death. Jamison had earlier co-written and sang the theme song from the television program Baywatch, called “I’m Always Here.” Here’s the theme to refresh your memory.

How’s that for a throwback?


HOT BLACK SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘85

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“ROCK ME TONIGHT

(For Old Times Sake)

(Paul Laurence)

Flip-Side

“ROCK ME TONIGHT (For Old Times Sake)” – Groove Version

FREDDIE JACKSON

CAPITOL RECORDS – 5459

His album Rock Me Tonight was ready to occupy the No. 1 position on the Hot Black LPs chart next week and for a final total of 14 non-consecutive survey-periods; but Freddie Jackson’s single of the same name (with a subtitle) was the biggest 45 on the Hot Black Singles chart this week in ’85. “Rock Me Tonight (For Old Times Sake)” was the principal recording for this, the fourth straight week out of an ultimate six on that survey.

The women loved Freddie Jackson; even those for whom he was not a backup singer. “Rock Me Tonight (For Old Times Sake)” was a strong debut for the former background singer of Evelyn “Champaign” King and Melba Moore. Freddie Jackson hailed from Harlem, Manhattan, New York, and was once a member of the R&B outfit called Mystic Merlin. Though only reaching No. 18 on the Hot 100 Singles chart, “Rock Me Tonight (For Old Times Sake)” was just the first of 10 No. 1 songs on the Hot Black Singles register. Freddie Jackson had dethroned the debut LP by Whitney Houston (**see below) as she had sat in that spot for just a week. But Jackson’s LP was simply too big to be just No. 2. In fact, after Whitney’s second run in the No. 1 spot for another five weeks later in the summer, Jackson’s album came roaring back to the pinnacle position yet again. Jackson’s follow-up single from the LP was “You Are My Lady” and was his highest charting Pop hit on the Hot 100 (No. 12) and went to No. 1 on the R&B chart in October of ’85 for a two-week time in power. Near the end of Jackson’s successful recording days, he made a guest cameo on TV’s The Golden Girls singing a snippet of the Disney ear-worm “It’s A Small World” to Estelle Getty’s character Sophia in February of 1989. Jackson still records, but music consumers seem to have forgotten this “Quiet Storm” phenom.


 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JUNE 22, 1985

 

TOP POP ALBUMS

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘85:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 3)

MUSIC FROM THE MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK

BEVERLY HILLS COP

VARIOUS ARTISTS  

MCA RECORDS5553

What a way to remember the “Reagan Years!” Beverly Hills Cop was not only a movie box-office smash (No. 1 grossing film for 14 weeks and highest grossing film released in 1984) but this week in ’85; the associated soundtrack was in the first of two sequential survey-phases as the foremost record album in America—with good reason. It had great songs. Yet, while the album was No. 1, there were no singles from the set to reach the Hot 100 Singles chart peak. The theme from the film, “Axel F.” by Harold Faltermeyer had been last week’s No. 1 single on the Adult Contemporary Singles and the biggest record on the Hot Dance Club-Play listings. In small print, you may find a disclaimer saying that some songs on the soundtrack album were NOT featured in the film; making it not really so much of a soundtrack, as merely a compilation of songs. But who’s to quibble. The album featured these singles, in order of Hot 100 Singles chart appearance: “Neutron Dance” by the Pointer Sisters (No. 6 Pop) “The Heat Is On” from Eagle Glen Frey (No. 2 Pop) “New Attitude” from future Dancing With The Stars vet Patti LaBelle (No. 17 Pop & No. 3 Hot Black) the aforesaid “Axel F.” from Harold Faltermeyer (No. 3 Pop and No. 1 Adult Contemporary) and finally another Patti LaBelle entry, “Stir It Up,” No. 41 Pop & No. 5 on the Hot Black Single listing. Considering that LaBelle’s second single release from the soundtrack was only recently released (in ’85) let’s give “Stir It Up” a spin here.

I’ve read a lot about the public’s thoughts about the soundtrack to Beverly Hills Cop, and there seems to be a consensus that MCA should have found a way to include the 1982 song from Vanity 6 (assembled by Prince) called “Nasty Girl” that was used in the sex club scene in the film. Just because I can, I’m including that song now!

Just for the record, Music from The Original Soundtrack to the Motion Picture Beverly Hills Cop sold over two million copies.

 

TOP BLACK ALBUMS

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘85:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 5)

WHITNEY HOUSTON

WHITNEY HOUSTON

ARISTA RECORDS8-8212

After spending 13 weeks slowly climbing the Top Black Albums chart, the record Whitney Houston finally hit the pinnacle position. But it didn’t last long—just one week, at first. That’s because Freddie Jackson’s album Rock Me Tonight had a meteoric ride to the top of that listing. Oh, but don’t worry, Houston’s LP had legs. It would replace Jackson several weeks later as the standard-barer on this chart (**see above.) Whitney’s album had been released on February 14, 1985 on Clive Davis’ Arista Records. But while Whitney’s debut LP was a smash on the Top Black Albums chart in 1985, it wouldn’t reach the crest of the Top POP LPs listing until the week ending on March 8, 1986. It would go on to sell over 13 million copies in the U.S. alone. Davis could never have imagined the impact of his find. The first single was a duet listed as Teddy Pendergrass (with Whitney Houston) called “Hold Me” which rose to No. 46 on the Hot 100, but all the way up to No. 5 on the Hot Black Singles chart.

The next single, “Thinking About You” missed the Hot 100, but rose to No. 10 on the R&B register. It was the track “You Give Good Love” that blasted things wide-open for the future Diva. That song got to No. 3 on the Hot 100 (currently this week in ’85 it was No. 17 on the Pop index, and had dropped down to No. 5 on the R&B chart) and had been Houston’s first Hot Black Singles chart-topping single.

Another tune from the album Whitney Houston called “All At Once” was not released in this country, but was a hit in Belgium, the Netherlands and Italy. “Saving All My Love For You” was her first across the board No. 1 Pop song for the Jersey Girl, followed by two more chart-toppers, “How Will I Know” and “Greatest Love Of All.” It was in New York City on February 12 through the 16th that Whitney made her debut as a solo singer at Sweetwater’s Club, singing songs from this album.

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.
(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


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