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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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June 12th, 2015

THE

BIG
SINGLES

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

June 13, 1964

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 17) “I GET AROUND”

(Brian Wilson)

THE BEACH BOYS CAPITOL5174  

***************************************************************************
No. 9 (LW 12) “PEOPLE”

(Bob Merrill / Jule Styne)

BARBRA STREISAND COLUMBIA42965

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 5) “HELLO, DOLLY!”  

(Jerry Herman)

LOUIS ARMSTRONG And The All Stars KAPP 673

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 8) “LITTLE CHILDREN  

(Mort Shuman / J. Leslie McFarland)

BILLY J. KRAMER                                    With The DakotasIMPERIAL66027

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 7) “WALK ON BY”

(Burt Bacharach)

DIONNE WARWICK SCEPTER – 1274

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 3) “MY GUY” 

(William Robinson, Jr.)

MARY WELLS MOTOWN1056

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 2) “LOVE ME DO” 

(John Lennon / Paul McCartney)

THE BEATLES TOLLIE9008

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 4) “LOVE ME WITH ALL YOUR HEART” (“Cuando Calienta El Sol”)

(Michael Vaughn / Carlos Rigual)

THE RAY CHARLES SINGERS COMMAND4046

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 6) “A WORLD WITHOUT LOVE”

(John Lennon / Paul McCartney)

PETER AND GORDON                  With Geoff Love’s Music CAPITOL5175

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“CHAPEL OF LOVE”

 (Jeff Barry / Ellie Greenwich / Phil Spector)

Flip-Side:

“AIN’T THAT NICE”

THE DIXIE CUPS

 

RED BIRD RECORDS10-001

When you mix songwriters and producers of this caliber, it was a pretty good bet that a song like this would be a “sure thing.” In this case, that axiom applied. Songwriters Jeff Barry joined his then wife Ellie Greenwich along with future jail-bird Phil Spector to write a song for The Ronettes. Producer legends Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller wanted to cut the song as well. The latter had just started a new label called Red Bird Records. The result was Leiber and Stoller getting the jump on Spector and his “Wall-of-Sound” techniques; giving them this week’s #1 record in the U.S.A. with “Chapel Of Love” by a group from New Orleans—Joan Marie Johnson, and her cousins, sisters Barbara Ann and Rosa Lee Hawkins—The Dixie Cups. This was the second of an ultimate three survey-phases as the biggest hit in America. Here’s the group lip-syncing to the original MONO single mix of the song on TV’s Hollywood A Go-Go.

Any stereo mix you hear today on some audio outlets is not the original version we heard on that Rock & Roll Hall of Fame 45 RPM recording. “Chapel Of Love” was arranged by Mike Stoller. The Dixie Cups was the only American recording group to reach the No. 1 position on the Hot 100 in the entire first half of 1964—that is if you don’t include Louis Armstrong and His All Stars with “Hello Dolly.” And that just shows the dominance of the Beatles during those six months of ’64. The Dixie Cups’ follow-up single do “Chapel Of Love” was called “People Say,” which sounded suspiciously like its predecessor for good reason; Barry and Greenwich wrote that song as well. “People Say” reached a healthy No. 12 on the Hot 100 during the summer of ’64. Their next singles didn’t fare as well, with “You Should Have Seen The Way He Looked At Me” garnering the highest position of No. 39, followed by an even lesser chart record (No. 51 Pop) called “Little Bell.” The girls did have one more Top 20 hit in them with a remake of a 1953 recording then known as “Jock-O-Mo” by James “Sugar Boy” Crawford, renamed “Iko Iko” reaching No. 20 Pop. Red Bird Records did pretty well right out of the box, with another Barry / Greenwich composition getting the No. 9 slot in a few weeks with a group from Jersey City, N.J. called the Jelly Beans, with a song called “I Wanna Love Him So Bad.” Then, the Shangra-Las began an all-out girl-group assault of the charts, beginning with “Remember, Walking In The Sand” (No. 5 Pop) and their biggest hit (No. 1 Pop) “Leader Of The Pack.” In fact, 11 of the labels’ first 30 45 RPM releases hit the Top 40. But Red Bird Records (along with sister labels, Blue Cat, Tiger and Daisy Records) was gone by the beginning of 1967—reportedly because Leiber and Stoller had brought in another record executive, George Goldner; who quickly incurred huge gambling debts, causing a New York mafia family to want all of the labels’ assets under their wing in exchange for the money owed. Leiber and Stoller sold the label to Goldner for just $1, and the producing duo ran for cover, getting back to their original occupations to get away from those unsavory types.

 

POP- STANDARD SINGLES

“20 45 RPM Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No.1

MIDDLE-ROAD

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“LOVE ME WITH ALL YOUR HEART”

(“Cuando Caliente El Sol”)

(Michael Vaughn / Carlos Rigual)

Flip-Side:

“SWEET LITTLE MOUNTAIN BIRD”

 

THE RAY CHARLES SINGERS

COMMAND RECORDS4046

Not THAT Ray Charles. THIS Ray Charles was a conductor / arranger named Charles Raymond Offenberg from Chicago. He had the prime 45 RPM on the 20-title chart called Pop-Standard Singles as The Ray Charles Singers with “Love Me With All Your Heart” on the Command Records label. On that record label, only two people are listed as the song’s writers. However, the original melody supposedly came from a Nicaraguan songwriter Rafael Gaston Perez, reportedly with the help of an Argentine composer Carlos Albert Martinoli. Then Spanish lyrics were written by brothers Carlos and Mario Rigual. Here’s where it really gets confusing. The English lyrics were credited to a guy named Michael Vaughn (or Maurice Vaughn) or often credited to a guy named Selig Shaftel, under the pen-name Sunny Skylar, who performed with many Big Bands in the ‘40s. But the original U.S. single in ’64 says it was co-written ONLY by Michael Vaughn and Carlos Rigual.

“Love Me With All Your Heart” was in the third of four back-to-back weeks in the pinnacle position on the Pop-Standards Singles listing. It reached a healthy peak of No. 3 during this survey-cycle on the Hot 100. Many cover versions appeared out of nowhere, as did many remakes over the years by dozens of artists. It is a pleasant song with this vocal arrangement by Ray Charles. Not THAT Ray Charles! Oh, never mind.   

 

**NOTE:

There was no Hot R&B Sides Chart this week in ‘64, as Billboard Magazine stopped reporting this listing from November of ’63 through January of ’65. In its place, I have chosen the Cashbox Magazine Top 50 in R&B Locations Singles chart to portray the biggest R&B single this week in ’64.

 

CASHBOX TOP 50 in R&B Locations  CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 6)

“MY GUY”

(William Robinson, Jr.)

 Flip-Side:

“OH LITTLE BOY (WHAT YOU DID TO ME)”

MARY WELLS

MOTOWN RECORDS – 1056 

By 1964, William Robinson was one of the most fruitful R&B producers/songwriters of the early ‘60s; and on this week’s No. 1 45 RPM on the Hot 100 Singles chart, the labels’ artwork featured just his nickname “Smokey” as the moniker for the producer. “My Guy” was in the last of seven ultimate weeks in the pinnacle position of the Cashbox Top 50 in R&B Locations chart, as sung by “The Queen of Motown,” Mary Wells. This “Hitsville, U.S.A.” song was not only the biggest single for Wells; it was the last solo 45 for the singer on Motown. Mary has the distinction of having the earliest No. 1 single on the Motown label. The first for Berry Gordy’s sister label Tamla Records was “Please Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes almost three years earlier. Wells had four previous Top-15 Pop hits all put together by Robinson.

Just as she was reaching No. 1 nationwide with “My Guy” (for two weeks on the Hot 100 during the middle of May ‘64) her husband and Motown staff member Herman Griffin, convinced her to end the accord with the company, already an option in her contract, the day Wells turned 21 years-old on May 13, 1964.  For a hefty advance, she signed a new contract with 20th Century Records. However; without the production and writing proficiency of Smokey and the exhilarating momentum that the “Sound of Young America” was enjoying, Wells was never able to achieve another hit single higher than No. 34 on the Hot 100 on any other label; except for one dual-sided chart single (both songs reaching the lower teens on the chart) as duets with Marvin Gaye, released just after “My Guy.” About two-years after a diagnosis of throat cancer, Mary Wells died in July of 1992 at the age of 49.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

June 13, 1964

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘64:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

HELLO, DOLLY!

LOUIS ARMSTRONG

And His All Stars

KAPP RECORDS3364

“Hello Dolly” by Louis Armstrong had ridden high for one week on the Hot 100 Singles chart for the survey-period ending on May 9, 1964, and on the Pop-Standard Singles listing in the No. 1 slot for an amazing nine weeks for the guy called “Satchmo” on Kapp Records. Now, his album also called Hello, Dolly! was at the apex of the Top LPs chart, for this, the second of eight eventual survey-periods. Who’da thought? His adaptation was recorded in December of ’63, intended as nothing more than a publishing demo to support the Great White Way’s newest musical. It was hastily sent to market as-is as a commercial release. Yeah…Louis did HIS adaptation as a demo!

Kapp Records was a very happy label, as “Hello Dolly” dethroned the Beatles in the weeks ahead on the Hot 100 Singles chart, after the Fab Four had reigned supreme there for a staggering 14 straight weeks with three different titles. It’s been reported that Old Satchmo liked his weed way before the Beatles were just a glimmer in their fathers’ eyes. The song “Hello Dolly” won a Grammy® for Song of the Year for the writer Jerry Herman, and it also won a Grammy® for Satchmo for Best Vocal Performance, Male—itself an amazing feat as he was best known as a Jazz trumpeter and the fact that he was 64 years-old at the time. The Hello, Dolly! LP contained remakes of several popular songs of the era; including his last previous hit (No. 29 Pop) from eight years earlier in 1956 on the Decca label, “Blueberry Hill.” “Hello Dolly” would go on to win a Grammy® for “Satch” in the Best Vocal Performance – Male category for 1964. The Jazz trumpeter/singer’s first recordings were in the early 1920s as a part of a band called King Oliver’s Jazz Creole Band. In 1949, Armstrong became the first Jazz performer to grace the cover of TIME Magazine. “Satchmo” (short for Satchelmouth) died in his sleep at his home in Corona, Queens, New York on July 6, 1971.      

 

**NOTES:

There was NO Hot R&B LPs chart during this period from Billboard, nor did Cashbox show a separate R&B LP list at this time. If anyone has copies of Record World’s R&B album charts, please get in touch with me at: BigJay@BigJaySorensen.com

Because I don’t have access to the Cashbox R&B LP charts (yet) I used the highest charted R&B LP on the BILLBOARD Top LPs (POP) list to be the featured R&B album this week.

 

PURE DYNAMITE!

LIVE AT THE ROYAL 

JAMES BROWN

And the Famous Flames

KING RECORDS883 

This LP was in the No. 37 slot of the Top LPs (Pop) chart in Billboard this week in ’64; the highest charting album from a pure R&B (African-American) artist. To be fair, Nancy Wilson’s LP entitled Yesterday’s Love Songs – Today’s Blues on Capitol Records was in the No. 15 spot. Subjectively, I decided her music on this album was more from the Great American Songbook, and wasn’t a true Rhythm & Blues album—though she’s a great artist. So, for that reason, my highlighted album in this section featured live renditions of some of James Brown’s recent singles and other tracks recorded at the Royal Theater in Baltimore, Maryland. In fact, the full title of the album as it appears on the label is: PURE DYNAMITE! All New! Recorded on the Spot. The Dynamic James Brown on the Stage of the Famous Royal Theater. Those recent singles done live included: 1962’s “Shout And Shimmy,” an early ‘63 B side “Like A Baby,” plus more live versions of “These Foolish Things,” “Signed Sealed And Delivered” and a new version of his 1960 R&B masterpiece, “Please, Please, Please.” It also contained a hit song from this set. Here’s the (not-really) live version (I explain below) of his early ’64 hit (No. 23 Pop) called “Oh Baby Don’t You Weep.” And, a first for James Brown singles; an over six minute track, with Part 1 on one side and Part 2 on the other surface of the 45 RPM. Because Billboard didn’t show R&B singles on a separate chart at this time, “Oh Baby Don’t You Weep” reached a respectable No. 4 on the Cashbox Top 50 in R&B Locations chart in early ’64. Listen to JB wail his lungs out along with the Famous Flames.

“Oh Baby Don’t You Weep” a last-minute addition to this album, and was based on the spiritual “Mary Don’t You Weep.” That single was the very first James Brown 45 RPM to have a picture sleeve on the front cover on the King Records label. And to be honest, I’ve discovered that the audience sounds on that single (the track above) were dubbed-in afterward to make it sound live. All of the other tracks were indeed recorded live at the Royal Theater in Baltimore in November, 1963. The LP included ample liner notes and pictures of the soon-to-be-crowned Godfather of Soul. PURE DYNAMITE! All New! Recorded on the Spot. The Dynamic James Brown on the Stage of the Famous Royal Theater was a well-recorded album for a late ’63 Long-Player. Having seen James Brown on-stage live, and later meeting him briefly after a show in Atlantic City later in his career, I can tell you he always gave it his all. If you like real gritty soul, grab a copy of this mostly live set.

 

 


 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JUNE 17, 1978

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 11) “LOVE IS LIKE OXYGEN”

(Andrew Scott / Trevor Griffin)

SWEET CAPITOL4549

 ***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 16) “YOU BELONG TO ME”

(Carly Simon / Michael McDonald)

CARLY SIMON ELEKTRA45477

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 7) “ON BROADWAY”  

(Barry Mann / Cynthia Weil / Jerry Leiber / Mike Stoller)

GEORGE BENSON WARNER BROS.8452

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 4) “FEELS SO GOOD”

(Chuck Mangione)

CHUCK MANGIONEA&M2001

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 8)

         TALE A CHANCE ON ME”

(Benny Andersson/ Bjorn Anderson)

ABBA ATLANTIC3457

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 3) “TOO MUCH, TO LITTLE, TOO LATE” 

(Nat Kipper / John Vallins)

JOHNNY MATHIS & DENIECE WILLIAMS COLUMBIA10693

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 6) “IT’S A HEARTACHE”

(RONNIE SCOTT / STEVE WOLF)

BONNY TYLER RCA 11249

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 5) “BAKER STREET”

(Gerry Rafferty)

GERRY RAFFERTY UNITED ARTISTS 1192

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 1) “YOU’RE THE ONE THAT I WANT”

(John Farar)

JOHN TRAVOLTA RSO891

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“SHADOW DANCING”

 

 (BARRY GIBB / ROBIN GIBB/ MAURICE GIBB /ANDY GIBB)

Flip-Side:

“ALONE AT A DRVE-IN MOVIE”

RSO RECORDS893

 

Andy Gibb was in the first week (a total of seven) for his biggest hit sitting in the No. 1 niche on the Hot 100 Singles chart in America with “Shadow Dancing” on RSO Records. This would eventually be the biggest selling single recording by Andy Gibb, and the 4th biggest hit of the entire ‘70s decade! The song “Shadow Dancing” was the first time a solo singer had their first three singles reach No. 1. As you can see by the above songwriting credits, the tune was written by all four Gibb Brothers.

1978 was clearly THE year for Gibb Brothers and for RSO (Robert Stigwood Organisation) Records.  In fact, the record company had a grand total of 29 No. 1 records, out of the 51 survey-phases in ’78! And the streak went back into 1977 with “How Deep Is Your Love” the first single from Saturday Night Fever. From the week ending on December 24, 1977 until the survey-period ending on May 13, 1978, RSO held down the No. 1 position on the Hot 100—for a total of 21 consecutive weeks. They’d have eight more weeks after that streak ended JUST in ’78 alone. During this period starting with “How Deep Is Your Love,” by the Bee Gees, the streak included (in order) “Baby Come Back” by Player, “Stayin’ Alive,” followed by “(Love Is) Thicker Than Water” by Andy Gibb, “Night Fever” by Bee Gees and lastly “If I Can’t Have You” from Yvonne Elliman, another Gibb Brothers’ composition. Later in the year, RSO had “You’re The One That I Want” featuring John Travolta and Olivia Newtown-John from the motion picture Grease, “Shadow Dancing” by Andy Gibb hit the heights for this week, the first of seven weeks at No. 1, in addition to the title track from the film “Grease” from Frankie Valli also written by Barry Gibb reach the zenith on RSO Records.

 

 

TOP 50 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“BLUER THAN BLUE”

(Randy Goodrum)

Flip-Side

“TWO IN LOVE”

MICHAEL JOHNSON

EMI AMERICA RECORDS8001

Born and raised in Colorado, Michael Johnson made Minneapolis, Minnesota his home on the coffee-house circuit just before his recording of “Bluer Than Blue” was the No. 1 song on the Top 50 Easy Listening Singles special survey. The 45 RPM stayed at the helm of this chart for three weeks, beginning with this seven-day survey-interval. “Bluer Than Blue” depicted just that from songwriter Randy Goodrum.

Johnson was born in Alamosa, Colorado and was signed to Epic Records as early as 1964 after winning an international Folk music contest. Michael Johnson is a prolific guitar player, taking time to study classical guitar with Graciano Tarrang_ and his daughter Renata in Barcelona, Spain at the Liceo Conservatory in 1966. He toured in Asia in ’67 and in ’68 joined the Chad Mitchell Trio with John Denver. In 1970, Michael Johnson signed with Atlantic Records. He had one “Bubbling-Under” the Hot 100 release, the No. 118 “On The Road” on Atlantic’s ATCO subsidiary. Ever hear of it? Neither have I. But after settling in Minnesota, Johnson signed with EMI America Records and recorded an album in Nashville, Tennessee with some studio cats called appropriately, The Michael Johnson Album. The second single from the album reached No. 32 on the Hot 100; “Almost Like Being In Love” written by the famous songwriting team of Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe. Johnson reached the Pop Top 20 with the No. 19 hit, a cover version of Bill LaBounty’s “This Night Won’t Last Forever.” That record did well on the Easy Listening Singles listing as well. Johnson moved to success on the Country charts after performing a duet with Sylvia. He had a No. 1 Country hit with “Give Me Wings,” the top Country song of the year in ’86. He had another Country chart-topping hit on RCA Records called “The Moon Is Still Over Her Shoulder” in May of ‘87.  Johnson has written songs with the likes of Michael McDonald and the late John Denver. Michael Johnson still records and performs and will be in the New York area this summer in Bayshore, Long Island at the YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts on August 16th. 

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“USED TA BE MY GIRL”

(Kenny Gamble / Leon Huff)

Flip-Side

“THIS TIME BABY”

THE O’JAYS

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL RECORDS3542

The O’Jays had a total of eight No. 1 songs on the R&B charts through the years; this one was their last. “Use Ta Be My Girl” was in the fourth of five consecutive weeks at the peak of the then called Hot Soul Singles chart on Philadelphia International Records. The song was co-produced by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff who also co-wrote the tune.

“Used Ta Be My Girl” was also the O’Jays’ last certified million-selling single. The O’Jays had a long history in the music business, starting in Canton, Ohio; with this song featuring the cream-of-the-crop of Philadelphia’s musicians. “Used Ta Be My Girl” was taken from the LP called So Full Of Love and also featured the single “Brandy.” As founding associate William Powell died in 1977, members of the O’Jays at this juncture were: Eddie LeVert, Walter Williams and newcomer Sammy Strain, formerly with Little Anthony & the Imperials. Strain later rejoined Little Anthony’s act, suing Gamble & Huff for what he claimed were unpaid royalties for the songs he performed on with the O’Jays. The O’Jays got inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in ’04, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2005.


THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JUNE 17, 1978

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

The Original Movie Soundtrack SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER

Various Artists

RSO RECORDS2-4001

This is the 22nd week of what would eventually become a 24-week odyssey as the prime album on the Top LPs & Tape chart for The Original Soundtrack Saturday Night Fever on RSO Records. By far this two-album set would become the leading album of the year in ’78. The assortment of songs had become No. 1 in the middle of January of ’78 and didn’t yield the solid gold spot until the week of the Fourth of July!  Interestingly, there are TWO versions of “More Than A Woman” on the soundtrack. On side A of the double-album, Bee Gees did their version and the band Tavares also did their rendition for side B. Bee Gees didn’t release their performance as a single, but Tavares did on their Capitol Records label.

The Tavares 45 RPM reached No. 25 on the Hot 100. The songs with an upbeat rhythm from Saturday Night Fever were written by the Gibb brothers, but not particularly written for the movie as some thought. And they weren’t done exclusively with the “disco” theme in mind. They had merely added more rhythm to some of their tracks begun in France at the Château d'Hérouville as they had done with “Jive Talkin’” and “Nights On Broadway” previously. The cow on the label’s logo was resultant of a paper-mâché item, as a symbol of good physical condition and good fortune. Stigwood told his graphic artist to merely add the letters RSO within the bull cow and that became their logo.

 

HOT SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

SO FULL OF LOVE

THE O’JAYS

 PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL RECORDS35355

Recorded at the Sigma Sound Studio in the City of Brotherly Love, the O’Jays had the principal album on the Hot Soul LPs chart for the last of three consecutive survey-cycles with So Full Of Love. This Philadelphia International Records release featured their last million selling single, “Used Ta Be My Girl.” (**See above.) The O’Jays last six straight single releases ended up on top of the Hot Soul Singles chart, with “I Love Music (Part 1)” and “Used Ta Be My Girl” both selling over a million 45 RPMs. This album also went Platinum with sales over a million, and featured a second single called “Brandy,” entering the Hot 100 in September of ’78.

Besides Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, longtime Philadelphia singer Bunny Sigler also sat in the producers chair for So Full Of Love for the O’Jays. The MFSB Orchestra did their usual fine job of keeping the music flowing from Center City Philadelphia.



 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JUNE 16, 1984

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 11) “BORDERLINE”

(Reggie Lucas)

MADONNA SIRE29354

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 14) “‘DANCING IN THE DARK”

(Bruce Springsteen)

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN COLUMBIA04463

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 10) “JUMP (FOR MY LOVE)”  

(Marti Sharron / Stephen Mitchell / Gary Skardina)

POINTER SISTERS PLANET13780

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 9) “SELF CONTROL  

(Original Music: Giancarlo Bigozzi / Raffaele Riefoli) (English Lyrics: Steve Piccolo)

LAURA BRANNIGAN ATLANTIC 89676

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 6) “THE HEART OF ROCK ‘N ROLL”

(Joey Colla / Huey Lewis)

HUEY LEWIS and THE NEWS CHRYSALIS42782

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 5) “SISTER CHRISTIAN” 

(Kelly Keagy)

NIGHT RANGER MCA52350

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 3) “OH SHERRIE” 

(Steve Perry / Randy Goodrum / Bill Cuomo / Craig Krampf)

STEVE PERRY COLUMBIA04391

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 2) “LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE BOY”

(Tom Snow / Dean Pitchford)

DENIECE WILLIAMS COLUMBIA04417

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 4) “THE REFLEX”

(Simon LeBon / Nick Rhodes / Andy Taylor / John Taylor / Roger Taylor)

DURAN DURANCAPITOL5345

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“TIME AFTER TIME”

 (Cyndi Lauper / Rob Hyman)

 

Flip-Side

“I’LL KISS YOU”

CYNDI LAUPER

PORTRAIT RECORDS04432

 

 

TONY® winner Cyndi Lauper was on a roll this week in 1984 with the top-selling single in America with “Time After Time.”This was the last of a concluding two-week stay at the top of the Hot 100 Singles chart for Cyndi Lauper with “Time After Time” on Portrait Records. Segments of the video for “Time After Time” were filmed at what was formerly a stereotypical Jersey diner in Wharton, NJ called Tom’s Diner. Other shots were completed at the NJ Transit train station in Morristown, NJ. Lauper’s album So Unusual had already spawned the No. 2 Hot 100 Singles chart hit “Girls Just Want To Have Fun” released in September of ’83, a month before the LP came out. That song sold over two million copies, but was prevented from reaching the top spot by Van Halen’s “Jump.” “Time After Time” was Cyndi’s first chart-topper, co-written by Lauper and the Philadelphia-based band Hooters’ co-founder, Rob Hyman.

Rob Hyman is the guy singing the duet parts of the song. The Hooters hold the distinction of being the first band to perform at the Philadelphia portion of Live Aid on July 13, 1985 at JFK Stadium in the City of Brotherly Love. The U-shaped stadium was torn down in 1992. Lauper had three further singles from the album So Unusual, including: “She Bop,” (No. 3 Pop) “All Through The Night” (No. 5 Pop) and “Money Changes Everything,” No. 27 Pop. Lauper spent her early days in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. She left school and traveled through Canada before joining a few bands in New York. She almost had to quit the music business because her vocal cords were injured from overuse. She retrained her voice with a vocal coach and joined a band called Blue Angel. Then she hooked up with a manager Dave Wolff who became her manager/mentor and boyfriend. He got her signed to a solo deal with Portrait Records (a division of CBS Records.) She was the female first singer since Petula Clark to have her first two singles reach the top-three (actually the top two.) Lauper won a Grammy® for ‘Best New Artist’ for ’84, and has had success in recordings and other venues through the years. Cyndi is celebrating her 62nd birthday on June 22nd.  The Hooters had seven singles themselves on the Hot 100, and were a huge band in the Philadelphia area.

 

 HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY TRACKS

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“TIME AFTER TIME”

(Cyndi Lauper / Rob Hyman)

Flip-Side

“I’LL KISS YOU”

CYNDI LAUPER

PORTRAIT RECORDS04432

 

This was also the third and concluding survey-stage on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart for Cyndi Lauper’s “Time After Time.” (**See above.)

 

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE BOY”

(Tom Snow / Dean Pitchford)

Flip-Side

“INSTRUMENTAL”

DENIECE WILLIAMS

COLUMBIA RECORDS – 04417

While the soundtrack from the movie Footloose was again the No. 1 Pop LP on the Top 200 Albums chart in America this week in ’84 for the ninth out of an eventual 10 survey-phases, the top Hot Black Single chart and Dance chart were both topped by Deniese Williams (she’d already been number one for two weeks on the Pop Hot 100 side) with “Let’s Hear It For The Boy” written by Tom Snow and Dean Pitchford. Williams was nominated for two Grammy® Awards for the song.

Pitchford has won Oscar® and Golden Globe Awards for his compositions, as well as several other nominations for Oscar®, Grammy® and Tony Awards®.  Her single sold over two million copies for Columbia Records. Nicknamed ‘Niesy’, June Denise Williams (a Gary, Indiana native) had several Pop and R&B chart hits from 1976 through 2007. “Let’s Hear It For The Boy” was Williams’ second Pop No. 1 single after having chart-topping success from a duet with Johnny Mathis in 1978 with “Too Much, Too Little, Too Late.”

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JUNE 5, 1982

 

TOP 200 ALBUMS

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK OF THE PARAMOUNT MOTION PICTURE

FOOTLOOSE

VARIOUS ARTISTS

COLUMBIA RECORDSJS39242

If your memory serves you correctly, you’ll retain the information that there was a glut of musical material from this one movie that seemed to be on the radio just as Footloose was sent to theaters. The soundtrack had only nine tracks, but six of those nine made the Hot 100 Singles chart in ’84, all within weeks of each other. This is the ninth of an eventual 10 weeks at the pinnacle of the Top 200 Albums chart for the soundtrack to the Herbert Ross film Footloose, starring Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, Dianne Wiest and John Lithgow. The first song released sold over two-million copies itself; “Footloose” by Kenny Loggins coming out first in late December, 1983. “Let’s Hear It For The Boy” (No. 1 on the Hot Black Singles chart -- see above) from Deniese Williams was next in February, followed the same month by “Holding Out For A Hero” (No. 34) from Bonny Tyler, “Dancing In The Sheets” by Shalamar (No. 17) released in February, “Almost Paradise…Love Theme from Footloose” (No. 7) from Mike Reno (Loverboy) with Ann Wilson (Heart) released in April of ’84. Another Loggins single from the soundtrack came out in May called “I’m Free (Heaven Helps The Man)”—reaching No. 22 on the Hot 100. The album was rounded out with tunes from Karla Bonoff, Sammy Hagar and the group Moving Pictures. In addition to “Let’s Hear It For The Boy” currently sitting in the No. 3 position on the Hot 100 and No. 1 R&B, another track was rapidly making its ascendency up the Pop list; “Almost Paradise,” which was sitting in the No. 14 position (soon to peak at No. 7) from the aforementioned Mike Reno and Ann Wilson.

 “Almost Paradise” would be a No. 1 song on the Hot Adult Contemporary chart soon. The Footloose soundtrack LP sold over nine million copies in the U.S. alone, with over another million worldwide. Kenny Loggins shared an Oscar® Nomination with co-writer Dean Pitchford for the Best Music, Original Song category for the tune “Footloose.” The record “Footloose” also received nominations for a Golden Globe® and Grammy® Awards.  

 

HOT BLACK LPS

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

CAN’T SLOW DOWN

LIONEL RICHIE

MOTOWN RECORDS6059

This album was HUGE—and had already been the top Pop album in late ’83—and this week, the top Hot Black Album chart was headed by Lionel Richie’s LP Can’t Slow Down which featured five Pop and R&B hit singles and went on to sell well over 10 million copies in the U.S., and over 20 million copies of the album worldwide. The album would end up spending 23 non-consecutive weeks as the top Hot Black Chart LP. This was the 21st of 23 ultimate survey-cycles at the peak of that listing. The only album that stopped it for any length of time during its run in the No. 1 spot on the Hot Black LPs listing was Thriller by Michael Jackson. Can’t Slow Down put Richie in special territory as one of the biggest albums in pop music history. The current single from Can’t Slow Down was the follow-up to “Hello,” “Stuck On You,” rapidly climbing the Hot 100, Hot Adult Contemporary, Hot Black Singles charts and even the Country listing! 


“Stuck On You” stalled at No. 3 for two straight weeks on the Hot 100; but would become a No. 1 song on the A/C list for five survey-periods later in the summer. “Stuck On You” also earned the No. 24 slot on the Hot Country Singles and Tracks chart. Can’t Slow Down was in the Top 200 Album’s top 10 for over a year; with five top 10 singles (two of those No. 1’s on the Pop Singles chart) in the span of over an entire year. The album was named Album of the Year at the Grammy® Awards of ’84. The LP was co-produced by Richie and James Anthony Carmichael, and has sold over 15 million copies in America and 20 million internationally; easily becoming the biggest selling album in the history of Motown Records.


**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.
(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


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