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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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May 29th, 2015

THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

June 1, 1968

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 10) “DO YOU KNOW THE WAY TO SAN JOSE”

(Burt Bacharach / Hal David)

DIONNE WARWICK SCEPTER12216  

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 6) “COWBOYS TO GIRLS”

(Kenny Gamble / Leon Huff)

THE INTRUDERS GAMBLE72119

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 8) “AIN’T NOTHING LIKE THE REAL THING”  

(Nick Ashford / Valerie Simpson)

MARVIN GAYE & TAMMI TERRELL TAMLA 54163

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 11) “MONY MONY  

(Bobby Bloom / Ritchie Cordell / Bo Gentry / Tommy James)

TOMMY JAMES AND THE SHONDELLSROULETTE7008

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 24) “YUMMY YUMMY YUMMY”

(Joey Levine / Artie Resnick)

OHIO EXPRESS BUDDAH38

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 5) “HONEY” 

(Bobby Russell)

BOBBY GOLDSBORO UNITED ARTISTS50283

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 1) “TIGHTEN UP” 

(Archie Bell / Billy Butler)

ARCHIE BELL & THE DRELLS SCEPTER1248

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “A BEAUTIFUL MORNING” 

(Eddie Brigati / Felix Cavaliere)

THE RASCALS ATLANTIC2493

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 4) “THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY”

(Ennio Morricone)

HUGO MONTENEGRO, HIS ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS RCA VICTOR9423

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“MRS. ROBINSON”

 (Paul Simon)

Flip-Side:

“OLD FRIENDS / BOOKENDS”

 

SIMON & GARFUNKEL

COLUMBIA RECORDS44511

 

Let’s spotlight Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel’s latest single this week in ’68—“Mrs. Robinson” which was in its first of three weeks at the high point of the Hot 100 Singles chronicle. The song was also an ingredient of the soundtrack album for the motion picture The Graduate, which happened to be the No. 2 Pop LP in the nation this week (eventually nine total weeks at No. 1) which was replaced at the zenith by Simon & Garfunkel’s new Long-Player Bookends. That album had swapped spaces with the soundtrack after a seven-week run at the helm; currently No. 1 on the Top LPs list for the second of what would ultimately become seven non-consecutive survey-periods. (**See below.) “Mrs. Robinson” was the duo’s second chart-topping single after “The Sounds Of Silence” (as it was spelled on early pressings of that 1966 45 RPM release) and also appeared on the soundtrack of The Graduate. The single was also No. 8 this week on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles special survey. The four minute single version of “Mrs. Robinson” was the one played on Top-40 radio at the time, as there were two different abbreviated versions on both sides on the soundtrack. But, here’s the single monaural (mono) mix that appeared on the 45 RPM release. Note the slight differences from the version we’ve been used to hearing in stereo in the ensuing years. Oh, and for the first time in perhaps decades, watch a real vinyl record spin.

The Graduate director (the recently departed) Mike Nichols asked lyric author Paul Simon for some songs for the movie; yet after submission, wanted one more. Simon said he was active with a tour and only had an incomplete song about “Mrs. Roosevelt” and played what he had for the director. Nichols is said to have raved over what he heard. So, Simon went back to work on lengthening the song and switching out Roosevelt for Robinson, which appeared as a single on a Columbia Records release in early April of ‘68. Simon says he added Joe DiMaggio’s name to the song, because the syllables of his name sounded better than his bona fide favorite New York Yankees player, Mickey Mantle. Joltin’ Joe was said to have been peeved about the mention about being “gone”—and it was years afterward that Simon was able to clarify to the baseball legend why he was included. But in an earlier interview, Simon said DiMaggio’s name was written for the song from the beginning! Which IS it, Paul? The elaborate harmonies by Paul and Art were accomplished with a then state-of-the-art eight-track console and tape recorder, by doubling their own voices with supplementary two-part harmony on top of the original. “Mrs. Robinson” was given a Grammy® for writer Paul Simon & Producer Roy Halee and performers Simon & Garfunkel for Record of the Year, and  Best Pop-Vocal Performance – Vocal Duo or Group at the ’68 ceremonies, broadcast on March 12, 1969.

 

Top 40

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“THE GOOD, THE BAD & THE UGLY”

(Ennio Morricone)

 

Flip-Side:

“MARCH WITH HOPE”

 

HUGO MONTENEGRO, His ORCHESTRA And CHORUS

CAPITOL RECORDS4930

If you thought the name of the single was kinda long, wait until you see the name of the album: Music From ‘A Fist Full Of Dollars,’ ‘For A Few Dollars More,’ ‘The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. I’m tired after writing that! Hugo Montenegro, His Orchestra And Chorus had the hit version (a cover-version) of the original from the soundtrack album conducted by an Italian guy named Bruno Nicolai. That guy was well known in soundtrack circles in Europe, the home of the so-called “Spaghetti Westerns,” including this one directed by Sergio Leone. Bruno Nicolai was an orchestra director and film music editor. But now back to Hugo. He was a conductor, composer and an arranger, who (despite his exotic-sounding name) was born in Brooklyn, New York. In fact, his first three singles (this being the first to chart above No. 100 on the Billboard list) were all taken from movies starring Clint Eastwood. First was “A Few Dollars More,” which could have used a few more promotional bucks from RCA Victor Records; as it only hit the Bubbling Under chart at a peak slot of No. 102. And—let’s just call him Hugo for space’s sake—had a third single called “Hang ‘Em High,” which only garnered the peak position of No. 82—a dismal follow-up to the biggest recording of his career—“The Good, The Bad And The Ugly.” It was No. 1 this week in ’68 on the Top 40 Easy Listening Singles special survey. This was the third and final seven-day list-phase for the single on this chart. Simultaneously, good old Hugo had a one-week stay at No. 2 on the Hot 100 during this same survey-period. The song had been at No. 4 there for three straight weeks. The runaway locomotive called “Mrs. Robinson” prevented Hugo’s go-to record from being No. 1. Here’s a nice stereo mix of the song.  

Now; about that Bruno Nicolai guy who conducted the Original Soundtrack album to the motion-picture The Good, The Bad and the Ugly. That soundtrack also sold quite a few copies, as it reached No. 4 on the Top LPs chart in ’68. Nicolai was also an orchestra director and film music editor who had a long association with writer of the song “The Good, The Bad And The Ugly,” Ennio Morricone. Nicolai died in 1991. Both he and Morricone had successful collaborations with mystery, erotica and horror fiction film music. The now 86 year-old Morricone has written over 500 songs; many used in films, including many Oscar®-winning movies such as: Bugsy, The Untouchables, Days Of Heaven and The Mission. But it was Hugo Montenegro who put together just the right combination of distinct sounds to have the hit cover version of “The Good, The Bad And The Ugly.” On this track, the ocarina was performed by a musician named Art Smith, with the memorable harmonica played by Tommy Morgan. Famous whistler Maurice “Muzzy” Marcellino added his specialty. But it was the grunting that made the song stand out. Oh, go ahead and play it again. That was performed by—you guessed it—Hugo Montenegro. He passed away at the relatively young age of 55 from emphysema in 1981…or perhaps from grunting one too many times. As from what we can determine Clint Eastwood is still talking to chairs.     

 

BEST SELLING RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“SHOO-BE-DOO-BE-DOO-DA-DAY”

(Henry Cosby / Sylvia Moy / Stevie Wonder)

Flip-Side:

“WHY DON’T YOU LEAD ME TO LOVE”

STEVIE WONDER

TAMLA RECORDS – 54165

This was the third straight 45 RPM from Stevie Wonder to have his mentors Henry Cosby and Sylvia Moy sharing songwriting credit with Stevie Wonder. The first of the three consecutive hits by the trio as “I Was Made To Love Her” which also included Stevie’s mom, Lulu Hardaway getting a credit. That one was on top of the R&B singles list for four weeks, and No. 2 Pop. Next up toward the end of ’67 was, “I’m Wondering,” reaching No. 12 on the Hot 100.  Then, this unlikely title of a hit song, “Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day” which was sitting at the pinnacle of the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles special survey for just this week on Tamla Records. Here’s a live TV version of this hit. 

Did you hear that odd sounding “thing” in “Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day?” It was quite possibly the first time he used the Clavinet on a recording. Here is the original single.

Berry Gordy, Jr. had blown up the “Little” Stevie Wonder moniker back in ’64 after he couldn’t buy a hit after his No. 1 Pop hit “Fingertips – Pt 2.” But finally, in late ‘65, Steveland Morris’ fortunes changed with one song—“Uptight (Everything’s Alright)”—also written by the three tunesmiths named above. It was becoming clear with the release of “Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day” in early ’68 that Wonder was exploring new sounds and minor-key songs. Though it reached No. 9 on the Hot 100, it struck just the right chords with R&B music buyers, included later as the second track on his ’68 album called For Once In My Life.  

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

June 1, 1968

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

BOOKENDS

SIMON & GARFUNKEL 

COLUMBIA RECORDS9529

Perhaps you were feeling groovy when you hung the 2’ x 3’ poster in your bedroom or basement.



That was included in early versions (360 Stereo Sound) of the LP Bookends (of course I had it) featuring Simon & Garfunkel superimposed upon the sun setting over Manhattan behind the  59th Street Bridge; officially called the Queensboro Bridge (now the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge) photographed by Don Hunstein and Bob Cato. Or perhaps you recall the album for the stunning album track song called “America,” finally released as a single after the duo broke up from 1972. Or maybe it was due to the singles “Fakin’ It” (No. 23 Pop) “At The Zoo” (No. 16 Pop) or “A Hazy Shade Of Winter” (No. 13 Pop) a 45 from late ’66. But it’s likely you remember Bookends for containing the stunning long stereo version of “Mrs. Robinson.”

Bookends was No. 1 this week on the Top LPs chart; the second of seven non-consecutive survey-periods as the leading album in America. Bookends was the album the cemented the bond with music lovers due to the wordplay of Paul Simon, along with the rich harmonies of his and Art Garfunkel’s voices and impeccable production by Roy Halee (with help from John Simon on four of the tracks) along with assistance from Bob Johnston. Just a side note here; with The Graduate at No. 2 this week, overtaken by Bookends just a week ago, caused a rare occurrence on the Top LPs listing, as two albums from the same artists flip-flopped chart positions at the apex—a quite unusual happening. In another couple of weeks, the movie soundtrack album from The Graduate would again replace Bookends for another run at the peak for a final four weeks before long. Recently, Art Garfunkel was quite vocal in a British newspaper interview about his partner, saying he agreed with a reporter asking if Simon had a “Napoleon complex.” Garfunkel also alluded to Simon being a “jerk” and an “idiot” (among other words) for walking away from their singing partnership at the height of their powers after the striking success of their LP Bridge Over Troubled Water. But Art doesn’t give up hope that they will perform together again before they can’t perform any longer. Garfunkel’s singing voice has apparently returned to form after cancelling many concerts during the last few years, as he’ll be back on a solo tour of the U.K. this summer. Garfunkel will be doing some shows in New Jersey in a few weeks, including stops at the Bergen Performing Arts Center in Englewood, The State Theater in New Brunswick at the end of June and the Borgata in Atlantic City in August. Simon has no live performances upcoming. 

 

 

BEST SELING RHYTHM & BLUES

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

No.1

R&B (SOUL)

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

LADY SOUL

ARETHA FRANKLIN 

ATLANTIC RECORDS8176

The top R&B LP this week in ’68 was yet again Lady Soul by the “right-rockin’-good-lookin’-good-cookin’ Sister-Soul” as she was described by DJ/voice-over artist Chuck Leonard (a WABC radio talent at the time) for a Coca-Cola ad. This album had longevity, as it was once again the prime record on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues LPs register for its 12th of an eventual 16 non-consecutive survey-cycles. The LP Lady Soul had been released by Atlantic Records on January 22, 1968. The most recent No. 1 song from Aretha’s album on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles chart in the U.S.A. was a track from the Lady Soul called “(Sweet Sweet Baby) Since You’ve Been Gone.” That single’s A side peaked at No. 5 on the Pop chart. Franklin and her then husband Ted White co-wrote “(Sweet Sweet Baby) Since You’ve Been Gone” with Aretha’s real life sister Carolyn and Erma Franklin (along with the Sweet Inspirations) on backing vocals. Some of the musicians on the track included her musical director at the time, sax virtuoso the late King Curtis, session wizard and songwriter (and Rock & Roll Hall of Famer) Dewey Lyndon “Spooner” Oldham and guitarist and former Valentines member, the late Bobby Womack. Arif Mardin arranged the superb horns, with Jerry Wexler listed as producer.

The B side of the 45 RPM “Ain’t No Way” also charted on the Pop listing, reaching No. 16 on its own. It reached No. 9 on the R&B chart separately in May of ’68, and was currently sliding back down the R&B singles list at No. 18. These were the third and fourth songs to reach the charts for Franklin from the LP Lady Soul. “Ain’t No Way” was penned by Aretha’s real sister Carolyn Franklin. Those two songs, plus Gerry Goffin, Carole King and Jerry Wexler’s “A Natural Woman (You Make Me Feel)” and Don Covay’s “Chain Of Fools” were also major hits from the Lady Soul album even before the Long Player was released. The Lady Soul LP eventually sold over a million and was reissued in a deluxe edition in 1995 on Rhino Records. Additionally, the LP reached number two on the Pop album chart and number three on the Jazz listing. But don’t look now, as the most recent 45 RPM from the new Queen Of Soul was making its rapid ascent up the charts—currently at No. 6 on the R&B Singles index—“Think” from a new Aretha LP called Aretha Now. That too would soon become a No. 1 R&B album in America.

 

 


THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JUNE 5, 1976

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘76:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 11) “FOOL TO CRY”

(Mick Jagger / Keith Richards)

THE ROLLING STONES ROLLING STONES19304

 ***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 14) “SHOP AROUND”

(William “Smokey” Robinson / Berry Gordy, Jr.)

CAPTAIN & TENNILLE A&M1817

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 9) “SARA SMILE”  

(Daryl Hall – John Oates)

DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES RCA VICTOR10530

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 7) “WELCOME BACK KOTTER

*(Later known as simply)

   “WELCOME BACK

(John Sebastian)

JOHN SEBASTIANREPRISE1349

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 8) “SHANNON”

(Henry Gross)

HENRY GROSS LIFESONG45002

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 6) “HAPPY DAYS” 

(Charles Fox / Norman Gimbel)

PRATT & MCLAIN REPRISE1351

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 5) “MISTY BLUE”

(Bob Montgomery)

DOROTHY MOORE MALACO2216

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 4) “GET UP AND BOOGIE (That’s Right)”

(Sylvester Levay / Stephen Prager)

SILVER CONVENTION MIDSONG INTERNATIONAL – 10571

***************************************************************************

No. 2 (LW 2) “SILLY LOVE SONGS”

(Paul McCartney)

WINGS CAPITOL4256

***************************************************************************

 

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“LOVE HANGOVER”

 

 (Pam Sawyer & Marilyn McCloud)

 

Flip-Side:

“KISS ME NOW”

 

DIANA ROSS

MOTOWN RECORDS1392

 

 

Ms. Ross knocked “Silly Love Songs” by Wings out of the top spot on the Hot 100 Singles chart for two weeks; but gave up the thrown as Paul McCartney’s song had another four weeks at No. 1 after “Love Hangover.” Diana Ross’ rendition was in its final seven-day survey-period at the high point this week in ‘76. The 5th Dimension recorded a cover-version, because Motown had released another song as the initial single from her LP called Diana Ross. That song was the Michael Masser and Pam Sawyer tune “I Thought It Took A Little Time (But Today I Fell In Love),” stalling at No. 47 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. Realizing they might lose a monster hit to the 5th Dimension, Motown quickly discarded their first choice and rush-released Diana’s version of “Love Hangover.” They both hit the Hot 100 on the same day (for the week ending on April 3, 1976, with the Ross edition destroying the ABC Records release; leaving it to the cut-out bins when it stalled at No. 80. Let’s hear the 5th Dimension version so you can compare the two recordings.

The song was written for either Ross or Marvin Gaye in mind by the composers Pam Sawyer and Marilyn McCloud. It was Sawyer who co-wrote Motown classics like: “If I Were Your Woman” from Gladys Knight & the Pips, “Love Child” by Diana Ross & the Supremes, “My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)” by a by then solo former Temptations lead singer, David Ruffin. Diana “The Diva” Ross was given the Disco-ball treatment in a darkened studio to get her in the mood to sing “Love Hangover” by the session’s producer Hal Davis. The Diana Ross LP and 12-inch single contained a greatly lengthened version of “Love Hangover,” clocking in at 7:49. Here is that 12-inch single version by Darling Diana.

Your Big Jay (then Jay the Jock) remembers filling the dance floors at a Jersey Shore club the very first time I played it. I got multiple requests for it later in the night. Note to budding wedding DJ’s…play it after a slow song to get people back up to do more fast dancing, as it shifts tempo while the song is playing.  

 

TOP 50 EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘76

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“SHOP AROUND”

(William “Smokey” Robinson /          Berry Gordy, Jr.)

Flip-Side

“BUTTERSCOTCH CASTLE”

CAPTAIN & TENNILLE

 

It doesn’t occur often, but now and then lighting strikes twice when recording a remake of a classic. This week’s No. 1 song on the Easy Listening Singles chart was first performed in 1960 by the Miracles featuring Bill “Smokey” Robinson, as it said on that original Tamla Records label. It was the Motown Corporation’s first million-selling 45 RPM release. The tune was written by Smokey and his boss Berry Gordy, Jr. Flash-forward to 1976, and after a few other remakes of the song, the other most successful interpretation was from the duo Captain & Tennille. The Captain was Daryl “Captain” Dragon, a keyboard wizard who had toured with the Beach Boys. He met Cathryn Antoinette “Toni” Tennille after he worked for a group she was with. After he left the Beach Boys touring unit, he recommended HER for the group as a keyboardist, and she got the post—making Toni the first Beach “Girl.” They decided to team after that assignment, and were signed to A&M Records. They married just before their first hit “Love Will Keep Us Together.” “Shop Around” peaked at No. 4 on the Hot 100 Singles chart and was featured on their second album, Song Of Joy. Here they are on TV’s The Midnight Special.  

The LP Song Of Joy also included Captain & Tennille’s previous hit, “Lonely Night (Angel Face)—a No. 4 Hot 100 million-selling single, plus the often maligned “Muskrat Love,” (also a No. 4 Pop and a million-seller) a song made semi-popular by the group America in ’73. The song was written and first recorded by its author, Willis Alan Ramsey, and was then titled “Muskrat Candlelight.” America first re-worked it as “Muskrat Love” so you can kinda blame them. Even their record label disliked the record when America wanted it released even before their album Hat Trick hit the streets in ’73. It stiffed—their third straight non-Top 30 hit. Cooler heads prevailed as they quickly released “Tin Man” which became a No. 4 Hot 100 smash. Back to the Soap Opera that was Captain & Tennille—Toni Tennille announced she was divorcing Daryl Dragon in 2013. Toni says on her website that she’s writing her memoirs, which should shed some light on why she divorced her long-time husband. This could be juicy.  

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘76

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

“YOUNG HEARTS RUN FREE”

(David Crawford)

Flip-Side

“I KNOW”

CANDI STATON

WARNER BROS.8181

Canzetta “Candi” Staton had put up with with a number of minor hits starting in 1969 up until her contracting with Warner Bros. Records in 1974. Her former label Fame Records (home of the legendary Fame Recording Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama) had eight pop-charting singles and 16 R&B singles in Candi Staton’s time there (including the remake of Tammy Wynette’s “Stand By Your Man”—No. 24 Pop) but her producer and one of the owners of the studio, Rick Hall, got her signed with the major record label after she garnered the designation “First Lady of Southern Soul.” Her first outing at Warner Bros. in ’74 didn’t crack the Pop Top 50, but about a year and a half later, she reached for the fences with “Young Hearts Run Free.” It got to No. 20 on the Hot 100 analysis, but was the biggest Soul Singles chart hit this week in ’76. It also charted at No. 8 on the Dance/Disco chart—and the song was also a big hit in England, reaching No. 1 for one sole week on the Soul list over there. Staton made a comeback of sorts in ’92 when she sang on a huge British hit called “You Got The Love” by the band the Source. Staton has been married five times; the first, the blind Soul singer Clarence Carter, most famous for classics like: “Slip Away,” “Patches” and “Strokin’.” She was also married for a short time to former Major League Baseball player Otis Nixon. Candi Staton has been belting out Gospel music since her days as one of Soul music’s divas.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JUNE 5, 1976

 

TOP LPs

& TAPE

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘76:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

BLACK AND BLUE

THE ROLLING STONES  

ROLLING STONES RECORDS8230

Keith Richards once commented that the LP Black And Blue by the Rolling Stones was more of a dummy run album or a jam session than a competently mixed set of tunes. He wasn’t too supportive of this collection in his auto-biography. The album, released on their own Rolling Stones Records label, nevertheless reached No. 1—twice. The first time, Black And Blue replaced the LP Presence by Led Zeppelin, and was in the peak slot for two survey-cycles. Then, Wings At The Speed Of Sound hit the zenith of the Top LPs & Tape chart for another week. So the Beatles/Stones rivalry was sorta still in effect in the ‘70s, as Black And Blue retained the No. 1 location again for an extra two weeks; four in totality. This week in ’76 was the third of those four. And, the Wings LP would again be in the pinnacle position for numerous weeks after the Stones LP weakened after bad reviews by key music critics. The set featured “Fool To Cry” a ballad that managed to reach No. 10 on the Hot 100 and the “disco-fied” song “Hot Stuff” which only reached No. 49 as the B side of “Fool To Cry.” However; in some circles, “Hot Stuff” was seen as the forerunner to the monster No. 1 hit to come, “Miss You.” That’s Billy Preston playing piano on “Hot Stuff,” with longtime Stones 6th unofficial member Ian Stewart on percussion, along with Ollie Brown banging on things (who as Ollie & Jerry had a hit in 1984 called “Breakin’…There’s No Stopping Us”) and Harvey Mandell on the smokin’ guitar licks. Here’s what I think is the better of the two tracks (at least in hindsight) released on a single; the B side, the very funky “Hot Stuff.”

Black And Blue was the first Stones album to feature the efforts of Ron Wood on more than one track, who was auditioning along with other guitarists (Harvey Mandell and Wayne Perkins, Peter Frampton, Jeff Beck and Rory Gallagher) to replace Mick Taylor. Production on this mishmash LP was claimed by the Glimmer Twins a/k/a Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. The album was actually held back for a year, when the original intention was to have it support a tour. They put out the compilation Made In The Shade instead.

 

 

HOT SOUL

LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘76:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

LOOK OUT FOR #1

THE BROTHERS JOHNSON

 A&M RECORDS64567 

Quincy Jones must have foreseen something great in the mix of Jazz and R&B/Soul when he produced Look Out For #1 for the Brothers Johnson in ’76. Two years later, he would partner with Michael Jackson for the production of their first album together, Off The Wall.  The Brothers Johnson are Louis “Thunder Thumbs” on bass guitar and George “Lightning Licks” on lead guitar, who had performed as a part of Billy Preston’s band up until 1973. The L.A.-based brothers joined Quincy Jones for a tour of the Far East and for a one-off single by Jones called “Is It Love That We’re Missin’” (No. 70 Pop) with the brothers getting label credit. Jones re-teamed with them in producer shoes for their first album as a duo. Look Out For #1 contained their break-out single “I’ll Be Good To You.” Here they are on TV’s The Midnight Special.

“I’ll Be Good To You” reached No. 3 on the Hot 100 and was a million-selling single, plus a future No. 1 on the Hot Soul Singles chart) in addition to another standout track “Get The Funk Outa Ma Face” (No. 30 Pop) which did well on the Hot Soul survey late in the summer of ’76.  Some very respected players helped record this album, including Jazz player Ralph McDonald on percussion, Dave Grusin on keyboards, Toots Theilemans on harmonica along with backing vocalists who also worked with Stevie Wonder, his one-time wife Syreeta Wright and Jim Gilstrap who was the singer on the opening lines of Wonder’s huge hit, “You Are The Sunshine Of My Life.” The LP Look Out For #1 sold over a million copies. This wasn’t the last of the Brothers Johnson, as they scored again the following year (’77) with psychedelic/soul throwback superb track, “Strawberry Letter 23” (No. 5 Pop and No. 1 Soul) and again in 1980 with the dance hit, “Stomp” (No. 7 Pop) and their final No. 1 Soul hit. The bros decided to go their separate ways in 1984.

 


 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

JUNE 5, 1982

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

 

THIS WEEK—LAST WEEK—TITLE—WRITER(s)—ARTIST(s)—RECORD LABEL—CATALOG NO.    

***************************************************************************

No. 10 (LW 16) “ROSANNA”

(David Paich)

TOTO COLUMBIA02811

***************************************************************************No. 9 (LW 6) “‘65 LOVE AFFAIR”

(Paul Davis)

PAUL DAVIS ARISTA0661

***************************************************************************

No. 8 (LW 11) “HEAT OF THE MOMENT”  

(John Wetton / Geoffrey Downes)

ASIA GEFFEN50040

***************************************************************************

No. 7 (LW 8) “ALWAYS ON MY MIND  

(Johnny Christopher / Wayne Carson (Thompson) / Mark James)

WILLIE NELSONCOLUMBIA02741

***************************************************************************

No. 6 (LW 7) “DON’T YOU WANT ME”

(John Callis / Philip Oakey / Philip Wright)

THE HUMAN LEAGUE A&M / VIRGIN – 2397

***************************************************************************

No. 5 (LW 5) “THE OTHER WOMAN” 

(Ray Parker, Jr.)

RAY PAKER, Jr. ARISTA0669

***************************************************************************

No. 4 (LW 4) “867-5309 / JENNY” 

(Alex Call / Jim Keller)

TOMMY TUTONE COLUMBIA02646

***************************************************************************

No. 3 (LW 3) “I’VE NEVER BEEN TO ME”

(Ken Hirsch / Ron Miller)

CHARLENE MOTOWN1611

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No. 2 (LW 2) “DON’T TALK TO STRANGERS”

(Rick Springfield)

RICK SPRINGFIELDRCA13245

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No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“EBONY  AND IVORY”

 (Paul McCartney)

 

Flip-Side

“RAINCLOUDS”

PAUL MCCARTNEY 
WITH
STEVIE WONDER

COLUMBIA RECORDS02860

 

Produced by Paul McCartney’s longtime cohort, George Martin, the No. 1 45 RPM on the Hot 100 Singles chart was a duet with Stevie Wonder on the track “Ebony And Ivory.” This Columbia Records release from the “Macca” LP Tug Of War was in its fourth of an ultimate seven weeks at the peak of Pop music during this seven-day survey-period in ’82. Martin claims that Sir Paul was inspired to write the song by a quote from the English musician/actor/comedian Spike Milligan (a very influential person from the comedy act The Goon Show on the BBC when the Beatles were young) claiming, “Black notes, white notes, you need to play the two to make harmony, folks!” “Ebony And Ivory” had the longest-running stay at the top of the Hot 100 by any post-Beatles McCartney single in the U.S. The song was on top of the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart as well. (**See below.)

For some reason, radio has backed-off from playing the track with any regularity. Perhaps it’s too simple, or perhaps it just doesn’t have the staying power of other McCartney and/or Wonder songs. Speaking of Stevie, also this week in ’82, Wonder was not only part-owner of the No. 1 Pop single in America with Sir Paul, but he also had a new compilation LP called Stevie Wonder's Original Musiquarium I sitting atop the Hot Black Album chart, peaking at number four on the Pop album chart as well. (**See below.)

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY TRACKS

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘81

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“EBONY  AND IVORY”

(Paul McCartney)

Flip-Side

“RAINCLOUDS”

PAUL MCCARTNEY WITH
STEVIE WONDER

COLUMBIA RECORDS02860

“Ebony And Ivory” was in the fourth of five ultimate survey-phases as the biggest hit on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks listing this week in ’82. It held down the No. 1 spot on the Hot 100 also for the fourth continuous week. (**See above.)

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82

No.1

SOUL

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“LET IT WHIP”

(Reggie Andrews / Leon Chandler)

Flip-Side

“EVERYDAY LOVE” 

DAZZ BAND

MOTOWN RECORDS – 1609 

Originally known as the Kinsman Dazz Band, the stripped down name Dazz Band was wearing the crown of the Hot Soul Singles chart this week in ’82 with their biggest hit, “Let It Whip” on Motown Records. This was the second of five non-consecutive seven-day survey-cycles to attain the No. 1 position on that survey. Dazz Band’s current album, Keep It Alive, was currently No. 29 on the Top LPs & Tape chart eventually peaking at No. 14 and this week the LP was sitting in the No. 6 spot on the Hot Black LPs survey, reaching No. 1 in another couple of weeks for one survey-period. Hailing from Cleveland, Ohio, the funk group Dazz Band got to the No. 5 slot on the Hot 100 Singles list (this week No. 19) and also eventually landed at No. 2 on the Hot Dance/Disco Singles chart. “Let It Whip” garnered Dazz Band a Grammy® Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. Here’s the extended 12-inch single version for your dancing pleasure.

The song was composed by the co-producers Reggie Andrews and Leon “Ndugu” Chancler—who not long after “Let It Whip” was recorded—notably played drums on some minor song you likely never heard of named “Billie Jean” by this Michael Jackson performer. Despite the infectious sound of “Let It Whip,” Dazz Band just couldn’t attain a follow-up Pop chart hit record, but had some Hot Soul Singles chart releases reach some high numbers after their monster 45 RPM fell to the record books, including “Joystick” and “Let It All Blow” both in ’84. Oh, and one more thing, please don’t confuse the song “Dazz” by the group Brick with this bunch of musicians known as Dazz Band.

 

THE

BIG
ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

JUNE 5, 1982

 

TOP LPS & TAPE

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

TUG OF WAR

PAUL McCARTNEY  

COLUMBIA RECORDS37462 

This was the second of three back-to-back weeks as the prime album in America for Paul McCartney’s best album in years, Tug Of War on Columbia Records. The LP was the first solo album after he let go of the band Wings after 10 years as an act. His McCartney II came out in ’79. It was his third solo album release up to this point. Paul teamed up once again with producer George Martin for this project along with former Beatles and Abbey Road studios engineer Geoff Emerick behind the audio console. As noted in the above story about “Ebony And Ivory” with Stevie Wonder; the Motown mainstay also had a hand in some vocals on Sir Paul’s LP as well. And even though Wings was officially a non-entity, the last remaining member (other than his wife Linda McCartney) Denny Laine also contributed his musical chops with some guitar and bass playing on this record. Add Ringo Starr and Paul Gadd as drummers (two drummers) on the studio track “Take It Away.” Yes, as you’ll see below, that was Sir George Martin playing piano on that track and one other on the LP. One of Paul’s heroes, early Rockabilly star Carl Perkins performs on guitar and vocals on the song “Get It.” Jazz and Funk guitarist Stanley Clarke guests on the track “Somebody Who Cares.” Eric Stewart (a one-time member of the Mindbenders, 10cc and other English acts) also added some vocals. Unlike his first solo album McCartney, released a week before the Beatles’ Let It Be, Paul didn’t play every single instrument and vocal on Tug Of War, but he performed a good amount of the music. Obviously, “Ebony And Ivory” was the monster hit from this set, with Wonder; but for me, “Take It Away” (reaching No. 10 on the Hot 100 in the summer of ’82) is a standout track. You have to love seeing Ringo and George Martin on the video.  

One of the most beautiful songs McCartney ever performed, “Tug Of War,” is another keeper. Here’s that title track to the album that unfortunately only reached No. 53 on the Hot 100; a misfortune of justice if you ask me.

And I could not let this feature just slip by without making mention of another stellar track; Paul’s tribute to his longtime partner and friend, John Lennon with a track called “Here Today.” You can’t listen to this song without getting a tear in your eye if you were a fan of the Beatles, Lennon or McCartney.

As usual, Linda McCartney supplied the photographs for this album.

 

SOUL

LPS

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘82:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

STEVIE WONDER’S ORIGINAL MUSICQUARIUM

STEVIE WONDER

TAMLA RECORDS9543    

Stevie Wonder was confirming, yet again, that his music was universally adored. Not only was his association with Sir Paul McCartney still in the No. 1 slot on the Hot 100 singles survey, with “Ebony And Ivory,” and No. 1 on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks list, his new double album on Tamla (Motown) Records was a part compilation—part new songs release. Some of his most loved previously-released music 70’s and early ‘80s music was included on Steve Wonder’s Original Musiquarium I, including a song never released as a single, “Isn’t She Lovely” originally on his ’76 album Songs In The Key Of Life. The song “That Girl” had recently spent an incredible nine weeks atop the Hot Soul Singles chart and reached No. 4 on the Pop singles list. The next single, “Do I Do” was an edited version of the over 10 minute album track that had Wonder rapping at the end (of the LP version.) The shorter version reached #2 on the Hot Soul Singles register, but did get to No. 1 on the Hot Dance Club Play list. “Do I Do” got only to No. 13 on the Pop singles chart during the summer of ’82, and had just hopped onto the Hot 100 last week.


Steve Wonder’s Original Musiquarium I was in the second of three eventual non-consecutive survey-phases at the crest of the Soul LPs chronicle. Another new song was “Ribbon In The Sky” which was not a huge Pop hit (No. 54) but it managed to get to the No. 10 slot on the Hot Black Singles chart later in 1982. The song was performed in 2012 by Wonder at Whitney Houston’s funeral service in New Jersey, with the song nominated for ‘Best Male R&B Vocal Performance – Male’ for a Grammy®. He lost the award for ‘82 to one-time label mate Marvin Gaye for “Sexual Healing.” Here’s “Ribbon In The Sky” from Stevie.



 


**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.
(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com


Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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