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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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April 10th, 2015


THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

APRIL 15, 1967


HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

 

 

No. 10 (LW 11) “JIMMY MACK”

Martha & the Vandellas GORDY7058

No. 9 (LW 12) “(I NEVER LOVED A MAN (The Way That I Love You)  

Aretha Franklin ATLANTIC2386

No. 8 (LW 2) “DEDICATED TO THE ONE I LOVE”  

The Mamas and the Papas DUNHILL4077

No. 7 (LW 8) “I THINK WE’RE ALONE NOW” 

Tommy James & the Shondells ROULETTE4720

No. 6 (LW 7) “WESTERN UNION”   The Five Americans ABNAK118

No. 5 (LW 9) “A LITTLE BIT ME, A LITTLE BIT YOU” 

The Monkees COLGEMS1004

No. 4 (LW 4) “BERNADETTE”  

Four Tops MOTOWN1104

 No. 3 (LW 5) “THIS IS MY SONG” (From Charlie Chaplin’s “A Countess From Hong Kong”)

Petula Clark WARNER BROS.7002

No. 2 (LW 1) “HAPPY TOGETHER”

The Turtles WHITE WHALE244

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“SOMETHIN’ STUPID”

Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra

REPRISE RECORDS0561



 

This was the initial week of an eventual four survey-phases at the crest of the Hot 100 Singles chart for Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra with their duet; the 2:36 treasure, “Somethin’ Stupid” on Frank’s label Reprise Records. Loads of people thought this was an original song for the two Sinatra’s. It wasn’t. The folk-singer named C. Carson Parks (sibling of songwriter Van Dyke Parks) penned and recorded the song with his then singing partner Gaile Foote as a demonstration record. Kapp Records was fond of what they heard and released “Something Stupid” (note the utterance “Something” and not “Somethin’”) as a single by the act Carson And Gaile. It was a total dud when released in 1966. Frank Sinatra became conscious of the song from his daughter and her producer Lee Hazelwood. Ol’ Blue Eyes suggested that he and his off-spring should sing it jointly and immediately. According to reports, it was Hazelwood (he’d already sung duets with Nancy) who actually told Frank to record it with his daughter, or HE would have done so. The Chairman of the Board booked a studio along with the now famous L.A. “Wrecking Crew,” and history was made on February 1, 1967 when “Somethin’ Stupid” was put on tape in four takes; making it the first father/daughter vocalized No. 1 record.

The song “Somethin’ Stupid” ended up being Frank and Nancy’s final chart-topper on the Hot 100 as either a solo or collective act. The song appeared on Frank’s 1967 LP, The World We Knew. That unique acoustic guitar on the track was performed by Al Casey, with Nancy’s producer Lee Hazelwood and Frank’s producer at that time Jimmy Bowen combining talents. 

 


TOP 40

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“SOMETHIN’ STUPID”

Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra

REPRISE RECORDS0561

In addition to having a four-week run at the top of the Hot 100, Nancy & Frank Sinatra’s “Somethin’ Stupid” (**see above) had already hit the No. 1 position with the week ending on April 1, 1967 (this was the third week on top here) and the record would continue as the Easy Listening Singles chart-leader for another six weeks—nine uninterrupted when all was said and done. Nancy & Frank’s 45 RPM release was by far the biggest Easy Listening Singles chart hit for all of ’67. On the FLIP side of “Somethin’ Stupid,” the Chairman-of-the-Board released a song from his recent That’s Life LP called “I Will Wait For You.” Of course your Biggest Jay has THAT song here too.

That song was featured as the second track on the LP after the title track “That’s Life.” Francis Albert’s LP was produced by Jimmy Bowen and was arranged and conducted by Ernie Freeman. The privileges to the rich Reprise Records catalog of music are under the name Bristol Productions L.P., which Sinatra put together in the mid-1950s to hold his burgeoning film pursuits. He selected British-style names for his companies, like Bristol and Sheffield—the unit formed by Sinatra to authorize his name and likenessbecause they sounded sophisticated to the Rat-Packer. As part of his estate preparation, he later assigned control of Bristol to his offspring, which caused all kinds of thorny issues.

 

TOP SELLING

R&B SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“I NEVER LOVED A MAN (The Way That I Love You)

Aretha Franklin

ATLANTIC RECORDS2386

Atlantic Records was having its best sales ever (up to that point) during the first two weeks of April, 1967. Much of that success came from the meteoric rise of the single “I Never Loved A Man (The Way That I Love You)” from Aretha Franklin. The song is No. 1 this week on the Top R&B Singles chart; the fourth of what would become seven survey-periods.

Franklin signed with Atlantic in late 1966 after a lengthy, but largely unproductive stay at Columbia Records. This week’s leader the R&B list became the springboard that launched Franklin into a superstar orbit; reaching No. 9 (peaking this week) on the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart. “I Never Loved A Man (The Way That I Love You)” was written Ronnie Shannon, who also would write a future hit (also a No. 1 R&B smash and Top 4 Pop record) by Aretha called “Baby I Love You.” Aretha’s signature song “Respect” was also on that LP (leading off the set) and would become her first Pop No. 1 single in the coming months. But that song had to be recorded in New York, as Aretha’s then husband Ted White pulled a hissy-fit while his bride was recording what would be the B side of “I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)” at the Muscle Shoals, Alabama FAME Studios; “Do Right Woman, Do Right Man.” Here’s the future “Queen of Soul” on The Merv Griffin Show with that song in a live setting.

Legend has it that a session musician was looking a bit too lasciviously at the future Queen of Soul, and White had a knock-down fight with the studio cat. Those fisticuffs cut short the session, with Franklin and spouse making haste for her home in Detroit. Franklin was nowhere to be found according to Jerry Wexler, her producer. They needed Franklin to finish the vocal track on the A side to be able to release the recording on vinyl; which Atlantic thought to be the stronger of the two cuts in the can. This altercation forced the recording of the rest of the LP to move to the Atlantic studios here in the Fun City. That transfer was made with reservations by Wexler, who was specifically looking for the gritty sound and ambience of the Muscle Shoals-based studio. But Wexler shifted most of the same musicians to New York to complete the album after White and Franklin calmed down about the confrontation and arrived in the Big Apple. White later claimed the clash was racial in nature; however that was disputed by Wexler and others in the studio at Muscle Shoals.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

APRIL 15, 1967

 

TOP LPs

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:


No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

 

“MORE OF THE MONKEES

The Monkees 

COLGEMS RECORDS102 

Mike Nesmith of the Monkees, when learning of the release of the LP More Of The Monkees, said that, “This was probably the worst album in the history of the world!” That’s because the man accountable for choosing the songs and the photos and information on the front and back covers, Don Kirshner, released it without even informing the four members of the ensemble. This was merely one of the actions that led to his discharge by the project’s producers and Columbia Pictures suits. But how bad could the LP have BEEN? This was the tenth of an ultimate 18 survey-periods at the summit of the Top LPs chart for the Colgems Records release More Of The Monkees—their biggest selling LP. The group’s second album featured the long-running No. 1 single “I’m A Believer” written by Neil Diamond and produced by Jeff Barry.

The B side “I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone” also attainted the  No. 20 slot on the Hot 100 Singles chart; written and produced by Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart and recorded on July 26, 1966 in Hollywood. Two other singles from More Of The Monkees were released outside the U.S. on RCA Records, including “She,” and “Mary Mary” (a Mike Nesmith composition) that was first recorded by the Butterfield Blues Band (that included Mike Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop) for their East-West LP in 1966. Here’s “She”—the opening track from More Of The Monkees; the biggest LP of 1967.

And the Monkees’ machine kept on humming, as the group’s latest single was No. 5 this week on the Hot 100; “A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You,” written by Neil Diamond. That song would peak in the weeks ahead at No. 2.

 

TOP SELLING

R&B LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘67:

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

temptations  LIVE!

The Temptations

 GORDY RECORDS921 

The above album title is NOT a typo. On this Long-Player’s cover, the name “temptations” was not capitalized. America’s prime R&B LP this week in ’67 was temptations Live!—in its second of three uninterrupted weeks as the No. 1 R&B album in America. This was one of numerous live albums the Temptations would record during their long and storied vocation; but it was the solitary LP with David Ruffin as an associate of the group. The then present hit single by the Temptations was with Ruffin on the lead vocal, “Beauty’s Only Skin Deep.” That song was not released on a standard ‘studio’ album (although it would appear on the vocal group’s earliest Greatest Hits LP.) The temptations Live! album was recorded at a celebrated R&B club in Detroit called the Roostertail Club in the “Upper Deck” of the establishment on October 3, 1966 on one of the club’s ‘Motown Mondays.’ Some of ‘The Funk Brothers” (Motown’s studio musicians) moonlighted there (and other joints) before and after their hundreds of recording sessions—usually playing jazz music—getting called to the studio at almost any hour of the day or night. By mid-to-late ‘60s standards, the duration of the LP was extraordinarily long for its day; timing in at 47 minutes and 45 seconds. It incorporated many of the group’s hits and standards by other artists. Here is the complete temptations Live! LP, featuring a few medleys of their hits and a small amount of standards and remakes, with each member gaining the spotlight—a special treat from your King of Record Pig, Big Jay.

Quite a number of the tracks on temptations LIVE! came from the Smokey Robinson songbook; including a long medley of songs to open the album. Detroit DJ Scott Regan (a facebook friend of mine) introduced the group as the first voice you hear on the recording. He was also the MC for a live Four Tops recording and introduced the Beatles when they visited Detroit’s Olympia Stadium in ’66 during their final American tour. Cornelius Grant (the group’s long-time live show arranger and musical director) lead a flawless band at this Upper Deck at the Roostertail Club appearance by the Temptations. The LP was released on Gordy Records on March 6, 1967.


THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

APRIL 16, 1977

 

 

HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77:

No. 10 (LW 4)“RICH GIRL”  

Daryl Hall & John Oates RCA10860

No. 9 (LW 10) “SO INTO YOU”

Atlanta Rhythm Section POLYDOR 14373

No. 8 (LW 9) “Love Theme from ‘A STAR IS BORN’ (Evergreen)”

Barbra Streisand COLUMBIA10450

No. 7 (LW 8) “I’VE GOT LOVE ON MY MIND”  

Natalie Cole CAPITOL4360

No. 6 (LW 1) “DANCING QUEEN”

ABBA ATLANTIC3372

No. 5 (LW 6)“THE THINGS WE DO FOR LOVE”

10cc MERCURY 73875

No. 4 (LW 7) “HOTEL CALIFORNIA” 

Eagles ASYLUM45386

No. 3 (LW 5) “SOUTHERN NIGHTS”

Glen Campbell CAPITOL4376

No. 2 (LW 3) “DON’T LEAVE ME THIS WAY”

Thelma Houston TAMLA54278



No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 


 

“DON’T GIVE UP ON US”

David Soul

PRIVATE STOCK RECORDS45,129

 

The Chicago-native, actor David Soul, was the latest heartthrob to have a No. 1 record on the Hot 100 Singles chart with “Don’t Give Up On Us” on Private Stock Records. David Richard Solberg, Jr., reportedly was almost a professional baseball player, but he turned down a deal with the Chicago White Sox to continue his college education. While attending college in Mexico, he took up the guitar, and performed as a folk singer. Returning to the states as a folky, he was seen on The Merv Griffin Show as “The Covered Man” wearing a mask while singing in ’66 and ’67. As an actor, he did a guest shot on an episode of TV’s Star Trek in ’67, which paved the way to get the part of Joshua Bolt on the TV show Here Come The Brides from 1968 through 1970. Solberg got some other TV roles; as a lawyer on Owen Marshall: Counselor Of Law, and some episodes of Streets Of San Francisco, Cannon, Gunsmoke and even on I Dream Of Jeanie with Barbara Eden and Larry Hagman. David also appeared as a rookie cop in the ‘73 film Magnum Force with Clint Eastwood. He then was cast as Ken Hutchinson a/k/a “Hutch” on Starsky & Hutch from 1975-1979. So why not cash-in on the fame with a recording career? He was signed by Larry Uttal, the founder of the Manhattan-based Private Stock Records; a label that existed from ’74 through its closing in 1978. “Don’t Give Up On Us” had a pretty good songwriting pedigree, with Tony Macaulay penning the tune. Macaulay was also known for partnering on songs like: “Baby Now That I Found You” and “Build Me Up Buttercup” by the Foundations, “Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)” by Edison Lighthouse (actually a studio group with the singer Tony Burrows) and “(Last Night) I Didn’t Get To Sleep At All” by the 5th Dimension. “Don’t Give Up On Us” debuted on the Hot 100 for the week ending on January 29, 1977; produced by Macaulay. 

David Soul’s million-selling single was the biggest hit in the land for just this sole survey-period in ’77. It was a huge success in the U.K. where David Soul (Solberg) is now a citizen. Can you spell follow-up? Apparently neither Private Stock nor David Soul had anything substantial up their collective sleeves, with just two singles charting later in ’77. “Going In With My Eyes Open” stalled at No. 54 later in the spring, and one last stab called “Silver Lady” put on the brakes at No. 52. That was it for the hit making potential of David Soul.

   

 

Top 50

EASY LISTENING

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77


No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

 

“RIGHT TIME OF THE NIGHT”

Jennifer Warnes

ARISTA RECORDS0223

She’s not a household name, but everyone has heard her songs. This woman recorded as just Jennifer as far back as 1969 with a record that was ‘Bubbling-Under’ the Hot 100 at No. 128 with “Easy To Be Hard,” three months before Three Dog Night’s version debuted as a single and became a No. 4 hit. Jennifer Warnes was off the charts completely until “Right Time Of The Night” debuted for the week ending on January 29, 1977 on her new label Arista Records. Back in ’69, Warnes had been in the Los Angeles production of Hair: An American Tribal Love-Rock Musical; thus the recording of “Easy To Be Hard.” Let’s hear HER version of it as a Big Jay Record Pig bonus track. 

That single by Jennifer (Warnes) had the song “Let The Sunshine In (The Flesh Failures)” also from Hair on the B side of that 45 RPM release. She became pals with Canadian cult-singer Leonard Cohen and toured with him for several years. Flash-forward to 1977, and Jennifer took a song written by Peter McCann called “Right Time Of The Night” and reached No. 6 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 on this, the Easy Listening Singles Special Survey for this sole week. Warnes was marketed as a pseudo Country/Pop singer, but after “Right Time Of The Night” she languished with mediocre chart success. Here is her biggest solo Pop hit, “Right Time Of The Night” from TV’s The Midnight Special.

Peter McCann had used his own composition as the B side to his only big hit, “Do You Wanna Make Love,” a No. 5 Pop million-seller also in the spring of ’77. Jennifer Warnes other highest-charting solo singles were the follow-up to “Right Time Of The Night” called “I’m Dreaming” (No. 9 Easy Listening—No. 50 Pop) “I Know A Heartache When I See One” which reached No. 19 on the Pop chart in ’79 and was a Top 10 Country hit. She recorded an Oscar®-winning song called “It Goes Where It Goes” from the film Norma Rae; but inexplicitly, it wasn’t a charted hit song. Other Warnes singles died a slow death on the Pop survey. But just after her time with Arista ended, along came the biggest-selling song of her career in ‘82, as a duet with Joe Cocker scored mightily with “Up Where We Belong” on Island Records from the hit film An Officer And A Gentleman. That 45 RPM sold over two-million copies and won an Oscar® for Best Song for the songwriters Buffy Sainte-Marie, Will Jennings and the legendary Jack Nitzsche.  Warnes had a couple more stiffs (as we say in the business) but another masterful pairing gave her one more million-selling single with the Righteous Brothers baritone singer Bill Medley for “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life—used in the film Dirty Dancing. That ’87 No. 1 song was co-written by Jersey-guy Franke Previte, John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz. Also, that was Jennifer Warnes along with B. J. Thomas on the second version of original theme from the TV show Growing Pains, with the song “As Long As We’ve Got Each Other” for seasons two, three, five and part of seven. Thomas had sung it as a solo for the first season, with Dusty Springfield singing it with B.J. for the fourth season. That version was released as a single without charting.  

 

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“AT MIDNIGHT (My Love Will Lift You Up)”

Rufus

featuring

Chaka Khan

ABC RECORDS122339 

This was the second and final survey-stage as the key 45 RPM on the Hot Soul Singles chart for Rufus featuring Chaka Khan with “At Midnight (My Love Will Lift You Up).” With their mainstream appeal waning, this song just managed to hit the No. 30 slot on the Pop Hot 100. However, the outfit still had a substantial R&B following. “At Midnight (My Love Will Lift You Up)” was the first single from the album Ask Rufus on ABC Records with some really superb horns in the mix. But there were troubles ahead during the recording of this album as I’ll explain after you listen to the 45 RPM mix of the record.

The album Ask Rufus ahead of the curve of the lead single, as it had been the biggest Long-Player on the Soul LPs chart for three weeks in March of ’77. However; the making of the LP was torturous for the band, as drummer and longtime member of the group Andre Fischer came to blows with Khan’s new husband Richard Holland in a rest room over the direction of the band’s music. Reportedly, even Chaka herself got in a few shots during this fracas. As expected, drummer Fischer departed the group after the tour to promote Ask Rufus was completed. The album was the second Rufus record to reach No. 1 on the Soul LPs listing; attaining a No. 14 highest standing on the Pop Top LPs chart. Ask Rufus was the second biggest Soul/R&B album of 1977. Two more singles sprang from the loins of Ask Rufus: “Hollywood” (No. 32 Pop—No. 3 Soul) and “Everlasting Love,” which only charted on the Soul register at No. 17. The then newly minted member of the Rolling Stones, Ron Wood, performed his magical guitar mojo on the Ask Rufus track called “A Flat Try.” That song was part of a medley called (shield your eyes) “Slow Screw Against The Wall” / “A Flat Try.” I warned you. Rufus still had two more No. 1 R&B hits in them, including “Do You Love What You Feel” (No. 30 Pop) and the No. 22 Pop hit, “Ain’t Nobody.”   

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

APRIL16, 1977

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

 

 

HOTEL CALIFORNIA

Eagles

ASYLUM RECORDS1084

The album Hotel California by Eagles was on top of the Top LPs and Tape chart this week in 1977. It’s likely you have a copy of this gatefold vinyl LP with the color printed inner sleeve, along with the three-panel poster of the group in a black & white sepia view. The Asylum Records LP had been on top of that chart on and off since February of ’77; trading places with either Wings Over America, Rumours by Fleetwood Mac, the soundtrack to A Star Is Born from Barbra Streisand or (the newly married) Barry Manilow Live later in the year. The LP Hotel California would, in the end, be No. 1 for a total of eight non-consecutive weeks. Let’s focus on the current single from the album, which would be No. 1 on the Hot 100 for just one week in May. “Hotel California” was written by three of the band’s members; Don Felder, Glen Frey and Don Henley. According to liner notes on a later compilation album, Frey said, “The song began as a demo tape, an instrumental by Don Felder. He'd been submitting tapes and song ideas to us since he'd joined the band, always instrumentals, since he didn't sing. But this particular demo, unlike many of the others, had room for singing. It immediately got our attention. The first working title, the name we gave it, was 'Mexican Reggae'.” The single won the honor of ‘Record of the Year’ for Bill Szymczyk (producer) & Eagles at the Grammy® Awards. The guitar solo in the song has been voted either best ever or in the Top-10 from guitar magazines globally, performed by Don Felder and newcomer Joe Walsh. It still dazzles. The single itself sold over a million copies, receiving a Gold Record by the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) on May 12, 1977 and has since been downloaded over a million times as well. On the original vinyl single (released in February of ’77 and the second single from the LP) the ‘B’ side was “Pretty Maids All In A Row,” another track from the Long-Player. So, I know you were wondering, what on earth is colitas? I’ll tell you after you listen and watch the video.

Now, here’s a look at the LP. Hotel California has sold over 20 million copies in America alone; still behind their own Eagles Greatest Hits selling approximately 30 million in the U.S., often neck and neck in sales with Thriller by Michael Jackson. This was the first album to feature former James Gang guitarist Joe Walsh; adding a harder rock bite that had been missing from the country/rock-tinged band previously.  The album was recorded in Miami at the Criteria Studios and in L.A. at Record Plant. And I know you were wondering about what “Colitas” was in the title track. You know the line, so go ahead—sing it—“Warm smell of colitas rising up through the air.” Huh? According to Eagles’ then-manager, “colitas” was explained to both Don Henley and Glenn Frey, as plainly implying “little buds” by their Mexican-American road manager, and additionally as Español colloquial speech for “marijuana.” Far out, man.

 

HOT SOUL LPs

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘77

No.1

SOUL

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


UNPREDICTABLE

Natalie Cole

CAPITOL RECORDS11600

This daughter of a superstar won a Grammy® for Best New Artist out of the box at age 25. While Natalie Cole had great success with her debut single back in 1975 with the song “This Will Be” (No. 6 Pop—No. 1 Soul) which also won a Grammy® for Best R&B Vocal, Female, the follow-up singles only scored on the Soul charts and fell flat on the Pop spectrum. That matter reversed itself with her first million-selling single “I’ve Got Love On My Mind” on Capitol Records—the longtime label of her father Nat “King” Cole. “I’ve Got Love On My Mind” was her third No. 1 Soul/R&B single and would ultimately be her biggest Pop chart hit as well, reaching No. 5, and a five-week Soul chart-topper from the end of February through much of March, ’77. Natalie’s album Unpredictable sat atop the Soul LPs Special Survey for this, the last of three back-to-back weeks in that position.

The Unpredictable album was produced by Chuck Jackson (not the singer from the early ‘60s known for “Any Day Now”) a former member of the R&B group the Independents (“Leaving Me”—a million-seller from ’73) and Marvin Yancy, also a part of that group. They also wrote most of the songs from the album Unpredictable. Not only did this LP hit the height of the Soul LPs chart, it managed a respectable No. 8 on the Pop Top LPs & Tape listing. A follow-up single from the album was called “Party Lights,” from Soul, Funk and Jazz pianist/songwriter Tennyson Stephens. Natalie Cole had a dry patch through the rest of the ‘70s into the ‘80s—although “Someone That I Used To Know” was a high spot in 1980. Natalie dealt with drug dependency issues from her rise to stardom in ’75 through the mid-‘80s when she went into a six-month rehab stay. She then found her singing chops again in ’87 with “Jump Start,” “I Live For Your Love” and “Pink Cadillac” the Bruce Springsteen song. Her last million-selling hit was a Grammy®-winner for Record of the Year and Song of the Year for her electronically produced duet with her father of “Unforgettable.” Her dad’s vocals on that track came from his own 1961 remake of a song he originally recorded back in ’52. That accompanying album sold over seven-million in the U.S. alone, winning Grammy® Awards for Album of the Year and Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance. Natalie Cole was married to one of the producers/songwriters on Unpredictable, Marvin Yancy. They divorced in 1980. He died of a heart-attack at the age of 35 in 1985. She married again in ’89 to the guy mentioned in the Rufus story (**see above) Andre Fischer. That union ended in ’95. She married again in ’91 to Kenneth Dupree, the Bishop of a huge church in Nashville. Those vows ended in 2004. Cole also suffered from the life-threatening liver virus (discovered in 2008) Hepatitis C, after her lengthy drug issues. Natalie Cole received a kidney transplant in 2009 the same day her sister Carol Cole died of the same disease that killed their father; lung cancer.

 

 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

APRIL 14, 1984




HOT 100

SINGLES

Top 10

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:


 

No. 10 (LW 5) “JUMP”

Van Halen WARNER BROS. 29384

No. 9 (LW 8) “ADULT EDUCATION”

Daryl Hall & John Oates RCA13714

No. 8 (LW 11) “HOLD ME NOW”  

Thompson Twins ARISTA9164

No. 7 (LW 4) “HERE COMES THE RAIN AGAIN” 

Eurythmics RCA13725

No. 6 (LW 7) “MISS ME BLIND”

Culture Club EPIC/VIRGIN 04388

No. 5 (LW 6) “AUTOMATIC”

Pointer Sisters PLANET13730

No. 4 (LW 10) “HELLO”  

Lionel Richie MOTOWN1722

No. 3 (LW 2) “SOMEBODY’S WATCHING ME”

Rockwell MOTOWN1702

No. 2 (LW 3) “AGAINST ALL ODDS (Take A Look At Me Now) 

Phil Collins ATLANTIC89700


 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“FOOTLOOSE”

(From The Original Soundtrack of the Paramount Motion Picture)

Kenny Loggins

COLUMBIA RECORDS04310

 


 

The soundtrack album for the film Footloose had six Top-40 singles released from it; three becoming Top-10 records and two of those were No. 1 songs. The title track from Kenny Loggins was in the last of its three-week run at the peak of the Hot 100 singles chart on Columbia Records. Loggins co-wrote the song with Oscar®, Tony®, Golden Globe® and seven-time Grammy®-winner, Dean Pitchford. It was Pitchford who wrote the screenplay for the film Footloose, based on a news item featuring a lifting of a ban on dancing in a small town called Elmore City, Oklahoma. The music video featuring Kenny Loggins and Dean Pitchford’s song was popular as well, with dance scenes that were performed by one of the film’s stars Kevin Bacon set in a warehouse, but with the original music from the film lifted, and the title track inserted instead. Here it is!

The soundtrack was strong enough to topple Michael Jackson’s mega-million selling album Thriller from the top of the Pop album chart; but that didn’t happen until next week in April of ’84. Loggins performed the song at LIVE AID in Philadelphia on July 8, 1985. Here is that LIVE AID performance featuring the amazing bass player, Nathan East, who had to turn down Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones who wanted his prowess on some album named Thriller so he could record and tour with Loggins.

Another No. 1 song on the Pop, R&B and Dance charts was in the wings from the film by an R&B singer named Denise Williams; also co-written by Pitchford. More on that in a future report in May. The film had a reconstruct in 2011 featuring Country music. That soundtrack album also went to No. 1, with four remakes from the original movie and eight new tunes. 

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES


THIS WEEK IN ‘84


No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“HELLO”

 

Lionel Richie

MOTOWN RECORDS1722

This was the second of an decisive six weeks as the standard-barer on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles listing for “Hello” from Lionel Richie. “Hello” was the third single released from the Long-Player Can’t Sit Down on Motown Records. “Hello” scored first at the top slot on this chart, followed on the week ending May 5th on the Hot Black Singles survey (for three survey-periods) and then on May 12th on the Hot 100 for two chart-weeks. Legendary L.A. Wrecking Crew musician Louis Shelton played the beautiful guitar parts on “Hello.” It was Richie’s then wife Brenda who told Lionel to include the song on his second LP, after he decided not to include it on his first album release. Reportedly, Lionel used to use the opening line of what became “Hello” in his head when he’d see a good-looking girl walk by in his hometown of Tuskegee, Alabama.

Bob Giraldi produced the short film; which has been derided as one of the worst ever music videos. The girl who portrayed the blind sculpting student in the video was actually fully-sighted—a then 26 year-old actress Laura Carrington, who later performed as a doctor on TV’s General Hospital toward the end of the ‘80s. Oddly, “Hello” became the first song from the Motown family to have a million-selling 45 RPM in the U.K! Lionel Richie would later record a duet with Sugarland singer Jennifer Nettles for a remake of “Hello” included on his 2012 Country album. But now, let’s get back to 1984. The LP Can’t Slow Down went on to win a Grammy® Award for Album of the Year. The LP was co-produced by Richie and James Anthony Carmichael, and has sold over 15 million copies in America and 20 million internationally; easily becoming the biggest selling album in the history of Motown Records.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“SHE’S STRANGE”

Cameo

 

ATLANTA ARTISTS RECORDS818384

 

Perhaps best known by Pop audiences for their No. 6 Pop hit, “Word Up,” Cameo struck it big as the prime 45 RPM on the Hot Black Singles listing this week in ’84 with “She’s Strange” on the Atlanta Artists Records label. This was the title track to their tenth album which reached No. 1 on the Hot Black Albums chart for two survey-periods at the end of April and the beginning of May and No. 27 on the Pop Top 200 Albums listing; all in 1984.

Cameo began its life as the 13-piece New York City Players in the ‘70s, but moved lock, stock & barrel down to Atlanta to seek a new sound. Leader Larry Blackmon didn’t take everyone with him, as the large ensemble was sliced down into a trio consisting of himself on drums, along with Nathan Leftenant on backing vocals and horn arrangements and backing vocalist Tomi Jenkins. They first started making some noise with the song “Rigor Mortis” in ’77; with the title a reference to being all alone or dead on a dance floor. Remember, this was at the height of dance music. And it was dance music that got Cameo included in the film Thank God It’s Friday as well as the soundtrack album that I premiered at Six Flags Great Adventure in 1978 for radio station WPST-FM. I vividly remember playing the Cameo song “Find My Way” which was recorded back in 1977 and was a giant Disco fave. However; that song was not released as a single from the soundtrack. Another track from Cameo on that album was “It’s Serious.” For his Cameo projects, Blackmon used a bevy of studio musicians in Atlanta. In fact, there are dozens of musicians that were past members added to the original trio when they became Cameo. In all, Cameo has had 39 R&B chart hits from 1977 through 1995, including “Freaky Dancin’,” “Single Life,” “Candy” and “Back And Forth.” Blackmon and Jenkins still perform as Cameo.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

APRIL 14, 1984

 

TOP 200 ALBUMS

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘84:


No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)



THRILLER

Michael Jackson

EPIC RECORDS38112

 

Yes, this was the very last week for Thriller from Michael Jackson to be in the No. 1 spot on the album chart (renamed during its run) to the Top 200 Albums. It was the biggest album of 1983 AND 1984; with a total of 37 non-consecutive weeks as the leading LP in America. See my previous columns about this incredible album with seven singles reaching the Top 10 on the Hot 100 Singles chart.

 

HOT BLACK ALBUMS

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83

No.1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 2)


BUSY BODY

Luther Vandross

EPIC RECORDS39196

 

If you’ve never heard the medley of “Superstar / Until You Come Back To Me (That’s What I’m Gonna Do)” by Luther Vandross, do yourself a favor and click below. Now…I’ll wait.

See? I told you. On the 12-inch version of that song, it was labeled as “Superstar (Don’t You Remember…)” on Epic Records. That medley of two very powerful songs is just one of the highlights on this week in ‘84’s No. 1 LP on the Hot Black Albums chart. This was the first of two back-to-back survey-phases at the summit of this register. The medley just reached No. 87 on the Hot 100; but attained the No. 5 peak position on the Hot Black Singles chart. The song “How Many Times Can We Say Goodbye” was on Luther’s LP and Dionne Warwick’s album, also named How Many Times Can We Say Goodbye; her first release for Arista Records. It was Dionne’s track, so she got the top-billing as Diva’s usually do. That song reached No. 27 on the Hot 100, No. 7 on the Hot Black Singles list and a very respectable No. 4 on the Hot Adult Contemporary chart. With the exception of these two singles, Vandross co-wrote every other song on the album with either Marcus Miller or Nate Adderley, Jr.

Up until that point, that single was the highest-charting Pop song featuring Vandross. But that would all soon change for the better, as the multi-Grammy® winner Vandross had a lengthy, prosperous career with Epic Records. Unfortunately, illness took the magnificent voice of Vandross at age 54 in 2005.   

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.
(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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