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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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April 2nd, 2015


THE

BIG

SINGLES

 

For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

APRIL 10, 1965


HOT 100

TOP 10 SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

No. 10 (LW 10) “RED ROSES FOR A BLUE LADY”

Vic Dana DOLTON304

No. 9 (LW 28) “I KNOW A PLACE”  

Petula Clark WARNER BROS.5612

No. 8 (LW 9) “NOWHERE TO RUN”  

Martha & the Vandellas GORDY7039

No. 7 (LW 17) “GAME OF LOVE” 

Wayne Fontana & the Mindbenders FONTANA – (1503 first issue, then) 1509

No. 6 (LW 6) “KING OF THE ROAD” 

Roger Miller SMASH1965

No. 5 (LW 5) “THE BIRDS AND THE BEES” 

Jewel Akens ERA3141

No. 4 (LW 4) “SHOTGUN”  

Jr. Walker & the All Stars SOUL35008

 No. 3 (LW 2) “CAN’T YOU HEAR MY HEARTBEAT” 

Herman’s Hermits MGM13310

No. 2 (LW 1) “STOP IN THE NAME OF LOVE”

The Supremes MOTOWN1074

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“I’M TELLING YOU NOW”


Freddie

and the Dreamers

TOWER RECORDS125


 

This was the first of two back-to-back weeks for the cheeky Manchester, England group Freddie and the Dreamers with “I’m Telling You Now” on Tower Records; a Capitol subsidiary. The band was led by Freddie Garrity, the comic element in an otherwise saccharin “Beat” group. Garrity has performed in a variety of what were called “Skiffle” groups in the late ‘50s into the early ‘60s. By the time he and his band had morphed into a hit-making “Beat” group, he was already 29 years-old—much older than most English singers of the era. Of course, his biography didn’t show his real birth date of 1936 for fear the kids wouldn’t buy their product. “I’m Telling You Now” was a hit in England in August of 1963, and was the 37th biggest hit of the year there; entering the U.S. Hot 100 a year and a half later, on March 13, 1965.

It’s almost painful to watch Freddie and the Dreamers all move their legs almost constantly during their performances. They must have had great leg-muscles over the course of two years. Garrity co-wrote “I’m Telling You Now” with the much acclaimed British songwriter Mitch Murray (real name Lionel Michael Stitcher) who also wrote “How Do You Do It” famous in the U.S. by Gerry & the Pacemakers. That song had been one of three the Beatles recorded during their first EMI sessions in London, when they also recorded “Love Me Do” and “PS I Love You.” The Beatles’ producer George Martin had wanted them to release “How Do You Do It” as their first single. The group insisted on putting “Love Me Do” out as their first 45 RPM, as their hearts weren’t into recording someone else’s material. Oddly, the Gerry & the Pacemakers’ version was a No. 1 song in England, just before the Beatles hit the apex of the chart with “From Me To You.” Martin was right about the hit potential of the song “How Do You Do It.” There were competing record labels for Freddie and the Dreamers material here in America. Capitol’s Tower label had hits with not only “I’m Telling You Now,” but also scored with “You Were Made For Me,” a No. 21 Pop hit later in the spring of ’65. Mercury Records released some of their U.K. recordings, including: “I Understand (Just How You Feel)” (No. 36 Pop) “Do The Freddie” (No. 18 Pop) and “A Little You” (No. 48 Pop) all in ’65. They did have another major U.K. hit with a song called “If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody,” but that wasn’t a charting single in the U.S.A. Garrity and group appeared on U.S. TV programs showing Freddie DOING a dance called “The Freddie” but the novelty wore off for the group by the time 1966 rolled around. Freddie Garrity died in 2006 at age 69 of emphysema. The group’s drummer Bernie Dwyer passed away in 2002.

 

MIDDLE-ROAD SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“KING OF THE ROAD”

Roger Miller

SMASH RECORDS1965

Roger Miller had his biggest hit record in the No. 1 slot on what was briefly called the Middle-Road Singles chart this week in ’65 with “King Of The Road.” The eventual million-selling 45 RPM was in the ninth of a concluding astonishing 10 weeks as the standard-barer on that register; becoming the biggest Easy Listening single that year. The single had reached No. 4 on the Hot 100 a few weeks back, and it would also was a hot-selling No. 1 song on the Hot Country Singles chart. But it was the so-called “Middle-of-the-Road” audience that embraced the song first, sending it to the top of the Easy Listening list. Here’s a live rendition of Miller’s classic.

“King Of The Road” was so popular; it crossed the Atlantic and was a chart-topping single in the U.K.—at a time when their home-grown artists were ruling the roost. Miller is said to have seen a sign with the phrase, “Trailers for sale or rent,” and that ended up being the opening line of the song. “King Of The Road” was also based on Miller watching a hobo (as he called him) at Boise, Idaho’s airport. Roger Miller was described as a Country singer, but his talents went far beyond that description. He was not just a singer, musician and songwriter, but Miller was also an actor who performed on his own TV variety show in 1966. Miller was the first artist to cover Kris Kristofferson’s “Me And Bobby McGee”—a Country hit in 1969; later made famous by Janis Joplin and the Full Tilt Boogie Band. Miller later composed the music and acted in the Broadway play based on Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn called Big River. The show ran on Broadway for two and a half years. Miller performed in Big River for three months as Pap, replacing John Goodman who left for a career on TV and movies. I participated in a radio interview with Roger Dean Miller in 1986 while Big River was on Broadway. He spoke of having a very rough childhood, being born in Ft. Worth, Texas, and losing his mother the age of one. He then lived with her sister in nearby Oklahoma on a cotton farm; joining the service at age 17 to avoid being arrested for stealing a guitar. Roger served in Korea. Miller was married at a young age, but divorced when he became labeled as a “wild-one” due to his drinking and other demons. When we spoke however, Miller was charming and came across as very low-key, but approachable. Back in the early ‘60s, he moved to Nashville, and starting writing for other artists; then had a string of hits including a few novelties: “Dang Me,” “Chug-A-Lug,” “Engine Engine #9. He recognized his success in the Mother Country with a song called “England Swings” in addition to a heart-wrenching ballad “Husbands And Wives” before giving up on songwriting in the late ‘70s. He was approached to write tunes for the new musical and acquiesced. Miller died of lung cancer at the age of 56 in 1992. He was posthumously inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1995.


HOT RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES

“Special Survey”

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“GOT TO GET YOU OFF MY MIND”

Solomon Burke

ATLANTIC RECORDS2276

Former mortician, Solomon Burke had his biggest Pop survey hit (No. 22) and the leading Hot Rhythm & Blues chart single in his career called “Got To Get You Off My Mind” on Atlantic Records. The Philadelphia-native, Burke had a long string of R&B and Pop hits starting in 1961 through 1975. This No. 1 Hot Rhythm & Blues 45 RPM was produced by Jerry Wexler at Atlantic on January 22, 1965. Burke wrote the song along with his then wife Delores and his mom Josephine Burke Moore.

Burke’s song was No. 1 on this chart for three survey-periods. There is a unique history to the record, as it was written in L.A. hours after Burke had left Sam Cooke at his motel. Burke found out that Cooke was shot and killed by the motel’s manager just two hours after the shooting on December 11, 1964. Burke also claimed his wife (who had 11 of his children) had sent him divorce papers via the front desk of his hotel when he returned that evening. Solomon Burke finished the vengeful song on the train back to Chicago with Cooke’s body for his huge funeral. Solomon Burke had been a Gospel singer much like Cooke had been in the ‘50s. Solomon was even called the “Wonder Boy Preacher” from the late ‘40s into the mid-‘50s. Some of his other superb Soul songs were: “Just Out Of Reach (Of My Two Open Arms,)” “Cry To Me,” “If You Need Me,” “Goodbye Baby (Baby Goodbye)” “Everybody Needs Someone To Love” and “Tonight’s The Night.” Burke died at age 70 on October 10, 2010.   

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

APRIL 10, 1968

 

TOP LPs

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:

No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

(Walt Disney Presents the Soundtrack of)

MARY POPPINS

Julie Andrews,

Dick Van Dyke,

David Tomlinson, Glynis Johns and Ed Wynn 

BUENA VISTA RECORDS4026

The genesis of Walt Disney wishing to make a film version of the book Mary Poppins happened as early as 1939, when he saw his daughter enjoying the novel. He began negotiations not long afterward with author P. L. Travers to get rights to the manuscript, and finally succeeded after numerous attempts in 1961. Disney then commissioned composers Richard M. Sherman and his brother Robert B. Sherman to write songs for what Walt envisioned as a musical. With many liberties taken, Disney’s film project was loosely based on the book, with a screenplay written by Bill Walsh and Don DaGradi. The movie was released on August 27, 1964 and eventually received 11 Oscar® nominations, with five wins for: Best Actress for Julie Andrews, Best Original Music Score, Best Visual Effects, Best Film Editing, and Best Original Song for "Chim Chim Cher-ee,” as sung by Dick Van Dyke (as Bert) along with the children who played Jane and Michael Banks—Karen Dotrice and Matthew Garber respectively. 



This week, the Mary Poppins Soundtrack was the No. 1 album in America for the second of an eventual 14 non-consecutive survey-periods. It had been No. 1 for the week ending on March 13th, and had a 13-week run at the apex of the Top LPs chart from the week ending April 10th through the survey-phase ending on July 3rd. Walt Disney Records became Buena Vista Records in 1959 to not only smooth the progress of the singing career of former Mouseketeer Annette Funicello, but also to be the label for sountracks to the studio’s motion-pictures and other contemporary releases. Mary Poppins was the biggest movie hit of the year. The most recognized tracks on the soundtrack are “A Spoon Full Of Sugar,” “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” and the above “Chim Chim Cher-ee.”

 

HOR R&B LPs

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘65:


No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 3)

 

TEMPTATIONS SING SMOKEY


The Temptations

 GORDY RECORDS912

It wasn’t just “Smokey” that the Temptations were singing, as Smokey usually had a partner helping him compose the music for songs. “My Girl” had already been a No. 1 Pop (one week) and R&B record (six weeks) by the Temptations; ending up being a two-million-selling 45 RPM for Gordy (Motown) Records. William “Smokey” Robinson had written “My Girl” along with Miracles member Ronald “Ronnie” White. They had sung together since before they were teens in Detroit. The second single from the LP Temptations Sing Smokey had just debuted on the Hot 100 last week, and was currently sitting in the No. 48 slot on that list after debuting at No. 77. It was also on the Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles listing at No. 17 after making its entry on that 40-song list at No. 30. It would end up reaching No. 18 on the Hot 100 and No. 3 on the Hot Rhythm & Blues survey. While “It’s Growing” was no “My Girl,” it did respectable numbers for the Temptations. Here’s “It’s Growing,” co-written by another Miracles member Warren “Pete” Moore; his group’s vocal arranger.

The B side of “It’s Growing” was also on the album, with the title “What Love Has Joined Together.” Other signature Smokey tunes on this Temptations LP included remakes of “You’ve Really Got A Hold On Me” (a Miracles hit in late ’62) and “You Beat Me To The Punch” a ‘62 No. 1 R&B hit for Mary Wells. Smokey remained the Temptations’ producer through the end of ’65; replaced by Norman Whitfield at the request of Motown owner, Berry Gordy, Jr. due to Robinson’s increasing role as Gordy’s right hand man at Motown. It was Gordy who wrote the lengthy liner notes on this album, which was seen as The Temptations Sing Smokey on the front and back cover, but as just Temptations Sing Smokey on the actual vinyl labels—from which I usually ascertain as the true title of a record. So despite sharing songwriting credits with others, it was decided to promote Smokey over any of his co-writers.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

APRIL 8, 1978

 

 

HOT 100

TOP 10 SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:



No. 10 (LW 11) “JACK AND JILL”

Raydio ARISTA 0283

No. 9 (LW 9) “THUNDER ISLAND”

Jay Ferguson ASYLUM45444

No. 8 (LW 8) “(LOVE IS) THICKER THAN WATER”  

Andy Gibb RSO883

No. 7 (LW 10) “DUST IN THE WIND” 

Kansas KIRSHNER4274

No. 6 (LW 5) “EMOTION”

Samantha Sang PRIVATE STOCK 45, 178

No. 5 (LW 6) “IF I CAN’T HAVE YOU”

Yvonne Elliman RSO884

No. 4 (LW 4) “CAN’T SMILE WITHOUT YOU”  

Barry Manilow ARISTA -- 0305

No. 3 (LW 3) “LAY DOWN SALLY”

Eric Clapton RSO886

No. 2 (LW 2) “STAYIN’ ALIVE” 

Bee Gees RSO885


 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“NIGHT FEVER”

Bee Gees

RSO RECORDS889

 

 

The song “Night Fever” was written by the Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, but wasn’t specifically written for the movie Saturday Night Fever as some thought. And it wasn’t exclusively with a “disco” motif in mind. They had merely added more rhythm to some of their tracks begun in France as they had done with “Jive Talkin’” and “Night On Broadway” beforehand. In fact, “Stayin’ Alive” and “Night Fever” used the identical drum tracks. “Night Fever,” (recorded first) had used the drumming of Dennis Bryon whose mother had died during the session. The group tried a drum machine to duplicate the sound, along with other drummers; only to finally make use of a tape loop of Bryon’s drumming added to the track of “Stayin’ Alive”—only slowed down a bit. The drummer never participated in live playing on “Stayin’ Alive.” Listen to the drums the next time you hear both songs and you’ll hear it’s the same exact beat, with only the slight speed variation! The Bee Gees tracks for the double album were finished in Miami. Was “Night Fever” an attempt at recreating the Percy Faith and His Orchestra’s song “The Theme From “A Summer Place”,”—a No. 1 hit in 1960? Likely it was, as Bee Gees keyboardist Blue Weaver was fooling around with a riff on string synthesizer when Barry Gibb walked over and asked what it was. Weaver told Barry it was trying to do a, “Makeover” of “Summer Place.” Gibb reportedly said it was a, “New song,” and proceeded to sing a riff over the part Weaver was playing. Voila—“Night Fever.” The track was produced by the Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, along with Karl Richardson and Albhy Galuten for Karlbhy Productions.

For you true Record Pigs and chart maniacs, it’s fascinating to note that from the week before Christmas of ’77 all the way to the week ending on May 13, 1978; RSO Records had the No. 1 single on the Hot 100 Singles chart. Those songs included: “How Deep Is Your Love” from the Bee Gees, “Baby Come Back” by Player, “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees, “(Love Is) Thicker Than Water” from Andy Gibb (reaching a peak of No. 8 on the Hot Soul Singles chart too) “Night Fever” also by the Brothers Gibb and “If I Can’t Have You” by Yvonne Elliman for a solo week. But wait—there’s more. Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta would have a solitary week in the top spot from the film Grease with “You’re The One That I Want” in June. Andy Gibb’s “Shadow Dancing” turned into a long-running No. 1 song (seven weeks) from the late spring through much of the summer of ’78. And finally, the song “Grease” by Frankie Valli written by Barry Gibb from the movie soundtrack Grease would become a No. 1 just before Labor Day. It was the year of RSO Records.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78

 

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“WE’LL NEVER HAVE TO SAY GOODBYE AGAIN”

England Dan & John Ford Coley

BIG TREE RECORDS16110

 

And you thought Dallas, high school pals England Dan & John Ford Coley recorded “We’ll Never Have To Say Goodbye Again” first. Ha. Nope, they didn’t. In fact, a remake of the song was released at the same time by Maureen McGovern. Her rendition didn’t chart. The song had roots in 1976, when it was recorded by the singer/songwriter Jeffery Comanor. His version is buried on an obscure ’76 LP on Epic Records called A Rumor In His Own Time. Look what I found! Here’s the original account.

On the advice of Clive Davis, then President of Arista Records, one of his acts, Deardorff and Joseph (Danny Deardorff and Marcus Joseph) recorded the song later in 76; and reached No. 22 on the Easy Listening Singles chart in ’77. Davis originally wanted Melissa Manchester to record it, but he passed on that idea. Here is the slickly played and produced, but little-remembered version by Deardorff and Joseph.

After they decided to part ways, the manager of Deardorff also became the manager of Maureen McGovern (perhaps best-known for her No. 1 song in ‘73 “The Morning After”—the Love Theme from the film The Poseidon Adventure) and Joseph’s manager was the guy who ran the business for England Dan & John Ford Coley. Wouldn’t you know? England Dan Seals performed on the original ’76 LP aptly titled Deardorff and Joseph. So now you can connect the dots to see how England Dan & John Ford Coley came to know this week’s chart-topping tune on the Easy Listening Singles chart with “We’ll Never Have To Say Goodbye Again.”

England Dan & John Ford Coley had nine songs reach the Hot 100 Singles chart, and “We’ll Never Have To Say Goodbye Again” was in the second of a concluding six non-consecutive survey-phases as the principal record on the Easy Listening Singles list. The song got to No. 9 on the Ho 100, their second highest chart single. Other hits from the duo were: “I’d Really Love To See You Tonight” (No. 2 Pop and No. 1 Easy Listening—their only million-seller and Grammy® nominee) “Nights Are Forever Without You” (No. 10 Pop and No. 1 Easy Listening) “It’s Sad To Belong” (No. 21 Pop but No. 1 Easy Listening), “Gone Too Far” (No. 23 Pop) and a remake of the Todd Rundgren song “Love Is The Answer” (No. 10 Pop) and another No. 1 Easy Listening hit. John Colley had his name shortened so people would pronounce it correctly, and was told to give himself the middle name of Ford for no real reason. “England” Dan Seals got the nickname because he loved the British Invasion sounds he heard as a young man in the ‘60s. The duo had been called Colley and Wayland (Seals’ middle name) but that was soon dropped before they struck the big time in ’76. Their first chart record bubbled under the Hot 100 called “New Jersey” in 1971. Of course your Big Jay has a copy of THAT song too!

That was guitar great Louis Shelton playing the lead guitar on that track on A&M Records. Dan Seals died from cancer in 2009 after having a big career in Country music as a solo artist. Coley continues to perform.   

 

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)



“THE CLOSER I GET TO YOU”

Roberta Flack

with Donny Hathaway

ATLANTIC RECORDS3463

 

It was the second and final week in the prime position of the Hot Soul Singles chart for Roberta Flack with Donny Hathaway with “The Closer I Get To You” on Atlantic Records. This was the second million-selling duet for Flack and Hathaway, after they scored a No. 5 Hot 100 hit back in ’72 called “Where Is The Love” which won a Grammy® for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group or Chorus. That song reached No. 1 on the R&B singles chart and the Easy Listening list. While claiming the top spot another time on the Hot Soul Singles chart with “The Closer I Get To You,” it was also a No. 2 Pop hit for a couple of weeks in ’78. The track was included in the late ’77 Roberta Flack LP Blue Lights In The Basement on Atlantic Records, released a week before Christmas. Hathaway had a sturdy career through the mid-70s, including a number of flourishing albums and he also recorded the theme to the TV show Maude starring Beatrice Arthur. Roberta Flack signed up two former members of Miles Davis’ band—James Mtumbe and Reggie Lewis—who became members of her band of musicians—to write the delicate song “The Closer I Get To You.” An accompanying video (directed by Flack) was released after Hathaway died.

The song had been originally thought of as a solo track on the LP, but Flack’s manager remembered their pairing on “Where Is The Love” back in ’72 on an album of duets with the two singers called aptly Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway, also on Atlantic. This week’s No. 1 Hot Soul single was Hathaway’s last 45 RPM release before his suicide on January 13, 1979. Hathaway had been depressed, thinking he was already a has-been in the music business just before recording this new duet hit. However; he reportedly appeared upbeat during dinner with Flack and another associate about their recent Grammy® nomination for Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group for their latest creation, “The Closer I Get To You” on the night of his death. Many of his friends still believe he accidentally fell out of a 15th floor window of New York City’s Essex House on Central Park South. To remember Hathaway, one of Flack’s best friends, she released two more duets in 1980. The first was called “You Are My Heaven” and the next was sadly called “Back Together Again.”

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

APRIL 8, 1978

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78:


No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

  

ORIGINAL MOVIE SOUNDTRACK SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER

Various Artists

RSO RECORDSRS-2-4001

 

By far the biggest album of the year in ’78, the Saturday Night Fever Soundtrack from the Bee Gees and other artists was enjoying ruling the roost for the twelfth straight week atop the Top LPs & Tape chart; leading to an eventual 24 back-to-back survey-periods at the zenith. The double-album had become No. 1 in the middle of January of ’78 and didn’t relinquishing the solid gold spot until the week of the Fourth of July! This week’s No. 1 Hot 100 Singles chart-leader was “Night Fever” in its fourth of an ultimate eight weeks at the crest of that survey. (**See above.) Currently at No. 5 on the Hot 100 was another Gibb composition also used on the Soundtrack album from Yvonne Elliman called “If I Can’t Have You.” The song would rise to No. 1 after the long run of “Night Fever.”

Elliman had played Mary Magdalene on the concept album and in rock opera and film Jesus Christ Superstar in ’71; scoring at No. 28 hit with “I Don’t Know How To Love Him.” Elliman had two other hits a bit before her No. 1 song. Those were “Love Me” (No 14 Pop) and the No. 15 Pop plus No. 1 Easy Listening Single; the remake of Barbara Lewis’ “Hello Stranger.” Her recording career languished after her monster hit. She had been a back-up singer, notably for Eric Clapton who was also signed to RSO Records for a while. RSO stands for Robert Stigwood Organisation (correct spelling) run by Stigwood (a former colleague of Brian Epstein who also managed the Gibbs and others) who would dissolve the label in the early ‘80s. The cow on the label’s logo was derived from a paper-mâché object, as a symbol of good health and good fortune. Stigwood told his graphic artist to just add the letters RSO inside the bull cow and that became their logo. This label’s eight year tenure was one of the most successful labels of the period.

 

HOT SOUL LPs

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘78


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)



BOOTSY? PLAYER OF THE YEAR

Bootsy’s Rubber Band

WARNER BROS. RECORDS3093

 

On this album, all the musicians were called “players.” This week, the prime album on the Hot Soul LPs chart was from the Parliament-Funkadelic bass guitar “player” William Earl “Bootsy” Collins. The album Bootsy? Player Of The Year featured Bootsy’s real-life brother Catfish Collins on guitar, Frank Waddy bangin’ the skins, Joel “Razor” Johnson  on keyboards, the “Horny Horns” along with Gary “Mudbone” Cooper & Robert "P. Nut" Johnson on vocals. With the help Parliament/Funkadelic founder George Clinton; Bootsy’s Rubber Band released four LPs for Warner Brothers between 1976 and 1979, as well as two 12" singles in 1982 and 1990. The first edition vinyl version of this album included a pair of cut-out star-shaped eyeglasses. Bootsy? Player Of The Year was the acts’ most successful album to date. The LP introduced Collins' roles as “The Player” and “Bootzilla.” In fact, the song “Bootzilla” was a No. 1 record on the Hot Soul Singles chart for a sole week two survey-periods ago. And “Bootzilla” was the record to bounce Parliament’s “Flash Light,” out of the top spot after a three-week stay; one of three million-selling 45 RPM’s for that George Clinton project. None of Bootsy’s Rubber Band’s singles managed to crack the Hot 100 Pop chart. Here’s the wind-up toy “Bootzilla” in all of its glory.

A second single called “Hollywood Squares” came from the LP. Bootsy reactivated his band under the name of Bootsy's New Rubber Band in 1994, with a lot of original band members. Just prior to that re-creation, Bootsy also had a hand in helping the dance music trio Deee-Lite have a major hit in 1990 (No. 4 Pop) called “Groove In The Heart.” The vocalist Lady Miss Kier Kirby from Youngstown, Ohio led the trio, which also included the deejays Super DJ Dmitry Brill from Kiev, Ukraine, and Jungle DJ Towa “Towa” Tei from Tokyo, Japan. Deee-Lite brought the feel of New York's club culture into the mainstream with their hit single, featuring Bootsy Collins contributing bass and additional vocals. The Parliament-Funkadelic musician also appeared in the music video, while Bootsy's Rubber Band became the defacto backing musicians for Deee-Lite during a world tour. Q-Tip from A Tribe Called Quest did the rap.

 

 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

APRIL 9, 1983


HOT 100

TOP 10 SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:

 

No. 10 (LW 14) “BEAT IT”

Michael Jackson EPIC 03759

No. 9 (LW 12) “JEOPARDY”

Greg Kihn Band BESERKLEY69847

No. 8 (LW 8) “SEPARATE WAYS (WORLDS APART)”  

Journey COLUMBIA03513

No. 7 (LW 9) “ONE ON ONE” 

Daryl Hall & John Oates RCA13421

No. 6 (LW 6) “WE’VE GOT TONIGHT”

Kenny Rogers and Sheena Easton LIBERTY 1492

No. 5 (LW 7) “MR. ROBOTO”

Styx A&M2525

No. 4 (LW 11) “COME ON EILEEN”  

Dexy’s Midnight Runners MERCURY76189

No. 3 (LW 3) “HUNGRY LIKE THE WOLF”

Duran Duran HARVEST5195

No. 2 (LW 2) “DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME” 

Culture Club EPIC / VIRGIN03368


 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“BILLIE JEAN”

Michael Jackson

EPIC RECORDS03509

 


The second single from the monster LP Thriller from Michael Jackson was “Billie Jean.” This was the sixth of eventual seven weeks at the summit of the Hot 100 Singles chart for the multi-million selling 45 RPM release. The album’s producer, Quincy Jones had a few colossal quarrels with Jackson about the track. First, Jones didn’t think the song was worthy of being on Michael’s forthcoming LP. Jackson succeeded in changing Quincy’s mind. The next argument was over the title; as Jones suggested it be called “Not My Lover” so it wouldn’t be confused with the name of the Tennis legend Billie Jean King. Jackson insisted on “Billie Jean,” and the title remained. Finally, Jones thought the introduction bass-line performed by Brother’s Johnson-member Louis Johnson was too long, once they had it on tape. Jackson convinced him it wasn’t; as that was what made him dance, along with the steady drum beats provided by Leon Ndugu Chancler.  

Michael claimed the song was based on groupies the Jackson 5 stumbled upon in their youthful years; but the tune was not built around any one person. The record has sold an estimated 5.5 million copies internationally; with 3.7 million of those sold in the U.S. alone since its release. “Billie Jean” on Epic Records was listed as the sixth biggest hit of the 1980s by Billboard Magazine and might have had a higher total had the Thriller album not been tied for the best-selling album of all time. Can you name the B side of Jackson’s biggest charting 45 RPM? Keep reading for the answer.

 

HOT ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83


No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

 

“MAKE LOVE STAY”

Dan Fogelberg

FULL MOON RECORDS03525

 

This was Dan Fogelberg’s 10th consecutive Top 40 45 RPM on the Hot 100 Singles chart, and his third of four No. 1 songs on the Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart with “Make Love Stay.” This Full Moon Records’ release from the singer/songwriter/guitarist came from the album Greatest Hits; one of two new songs on the compilation including his previous single, “Missing You.” “Make Love Stay” was based upon Fogelberg reading a quirky and decidedly left-field 1980 novel by author Tom Robbins called Still Life with Woodpecker. Particularly, the song dwells on one chapter in the book relating to the question of love lasting or fading— much like two of the main characters in the book dealing with romance.

“Make Love Stay” may have been a No. 1 Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart record, but it only peaked at No. 29 on the Hot 100. The prior single from the album Greatest Hits “Missing You” did a bit better on the Pop chart; reaching No. 23, but stalling at No. 6 on the Adult Contemporary listing. By far, Fogelberg’s biggest hit was 1980’s “Longer” sitting at the No. 2 spot on the Hot 100 for two survey-phases, and one week at the peak of the Adult Contemporary chart. That track was from Dan’s late ’79/early ’80 LP called Phoenix. His longest run in the No. 1 position was two consecutive weeks on the Hot Adult Contemporary listing with his tearful song about his dad, “Leader Of The Band.” Of course, it wouldn’t be the week before New Year’s Day without “Same Old Lang Syne,” a No. 9 Pop hit. Both of those two songs were originally on Fogelberg’s LP The Innocent Age. While it seemed that Fogelberg produced semi-folky “soft-rock” songs, he could rock out with the best of them. Your Big Jay is particularly fond of the title track from Dan’s album Nether Lands. Sadly, the Illinois native died in 2007 at his home in Dear Isle, Maine due to prostate cancer. In 2008, a street in Peoria, Illinois was renamed Fogelberg Parkway in honor of not just Dan, but also his father (a local high school band director) Lawrence Peter Fogelberg.

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83


No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“BILLIE JEAN”

Michael Jackson

 

EPIC RECORDS1602

 

It was the last of an astonishing eventual nine consecutive weeks as the Hot Black Singles chart-leader this week in ’83 for “Billie Jean” from Michael Jackson on Epic Records. (**See above.) The single, from the album Thriller, erupted after Jackson (along with Paul McCartney) had completed a three-week run at No. 2 on the Hot 100 at the end of ’82 into early ’83 with their duet (the first single from Thriller) “The Girl Is Mine.” “Billie Jean” became the Pop Hot 100 Singles chart-topper during the first week in March with a seven-week stretch in the premier position. The B side of the 45 RPM “Billie Jean” was the non-LP track called “Can’t Get Outta The Rain.”

Released just five weeks after “Billy Jean” entered the Hot 100, Epic released the Rock song “Beat It.” Like “Billie Jean,” “Beat It” sold over two million 45 RPMs, featuring Eddie Van Halen on the guitar solo.   

 

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

APRIL 9, 1983

 

TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83:


No.1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


THRILLER

Michael Jackson

EPIC RECORDS38112

This was the seventh of an ultimate 37 survey-phases at the crest of the Top LPs & Tape chart. The album hit the No. 1 slot on this survey for the first time with the week ending on February 26, 1983. Let’s feature one of the songs that was NOT a single from Thriller; “Baby Be Mine.”

“Baby Be Mine” was written by the keyboard player for the group Heatwave, Rod Temperton. His group was famous for songs like: “Boogie Nights,” “The Groove Line” and the perpetual wedding song, “Always And Forever.”

 

HOT BLACK ALBUMS

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘83

 

No.1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)


THRILLER

Michael Jackson 

EPIC RECORDS38112

Over on the Hot Black LPs chart, Thriller had already been in the No. 1 slot since the week ending on January 29, 1983—four weeks before the Pop LP list explosion. With the January 3, 1983 release of “Billie Jean,” Black record buyers jumped on the album that had already been out since November 30, 1982. Here’s the other song that was not released as a single from Thriller; “The Lady In My Life.”

In all, Thriller would be in the pinnacle position on the Hot Black Albums register for 37 non-consecutive seven-day survey-stages. The LP went on to win Grammy® Awards for: Album of the Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male. “Beat It” won the award for Record of the Year and Best Rock Vocal Performance. “Billie Jean” was awarded a Grammy® for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male and Best Rhythm & Blues Song. Quincy Jones won a Grammy® for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical. In addition, Thriller had been nominated for four other awards, but voters gave those to someone else. It’s hard to keep track of all of the worldwide awards given to Jackson and Quincy Jones.

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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