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BIG Jay's BIG Week In Pop Music History

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February 6th, 2015


THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

February 10, 1968


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

 

No. 5 (LW 3) “CHAIN OF FOOLS”

Aretha Franklin ATLANTIC2464

No. 4 (LW 2) “JUDY IN DIGUISE (WITH GLASSES)”

John Fred and His Playboy Band  PAULA282

No. 3 (LW 4) “SPOOKY”  

Classics IV IMPERIAL66259

No. 2 (LW 1) “GREEN TAMBOURINE” 

The Lemon Pipers BUDDAH23

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 7)


“LOVE IS BLUE (L’AMOUR EST BLEU)”


Paul Mauriat

and His Orchestra

PHILIPS RECORDS40495

Call this one “Chamber-Pop.” The week’s top single in America was actually an instrumental orchestral version of the song “L'amour est bleu” (“Love Is Blue” in English) performed in French by a Greek singer Vicky Leandros. She had also recorded the song in English, German, Italian, Dutch and a reported 14 other languages. Her vocal rendition was a moderate hit in Canada in ’67. Follow that so far? It gets more international in scope as her French version of the song was Luxembourg’s entry in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1967 in Vienna, Austria. Welcome to the United Nations! By the way, the song came in fourth. But orchestra leader Paul Mauriat was the big winner, as he simply used the melody written by Andre Popp for a lush harpsichord-laden version that struck gold in the U.S. Mauriat was the first French artist to have a number one record in America, and “Love Is Blue” was in its first of five weeks in the top slot this week in ’68. I bring to you the original MONO 45 RPM version which is the way many of us remember the song on AM Radio this week in ’68.

The Philips Records release was not only the pinnacle Pop record on the Hot 100 Singles chart, it was also No. 1 for a total of an amazing 11 weeks on the Easy-Listening Singles chart beginning NEXT week. Mauriat’s LP, Blooming Hits became a No. 1 album on the Top LPs chart as well during the entire month of March, 1968. Mauriat, under the name Del Roma, wrote a song called “Chariot” (along with another bandleader Frank Pourcel using the pseudonym J. W. Stole) which was a big hit in France for Petula Clark in 1962. That song (with newly written English lyrics) became a No. 1 song in America for “Little” Peggy March; re-titled, “I Will Follow Him.” Mauriat died in 2006.

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

EASY LISTENING

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“THE LESSON”

Vikki Carr

LIBERTY RECORDS – 56012

This week’s new No. 1 45 RPM “The Lesson” was in that position for a sole week. This was Vikki Carr’s second straight No. 1 record on the Easy Listening Singles listing; the follow-up to her million-selling record “It Must Be Him” on Liberty Records. Born in El Paso, Texas, Vikki Carr’s real name was Florencia Bisenta de Casillas Martinez Cardona, and had major success singing Spanish songs later her career. But early on, she scored with Easy Listening (or Middle-of- the-Road) audiences with “It Must Be Him” that reached No. 3 on the Hot 100, and in that slot for three weeks. “The Lesson” learned was that it’s hard to follow-up a big hit on the Pop chart, as this single only managed to get up to No. 34 on the Hot 100.

You can also link the success of the song “He’s A Rebel” written by Gene Pitney to Vikki Carr, as it’s been reported often that producer Phil Spector happened to hear that she was set to record the song turned down by the Shirelles. Spector wanted to get a version recorded and released quickly, and while credited to the Crystals (who were touring in New York at the time) it was actually the Blossoms (featuring Darlene Love) who sang on the hit 45 RPM recorded in L.A. with the infamous Wrecking Crew studio cats. Carr’s version was released, but only reached No. 115—‘bubbling-under’ on the Pop list. This week’s No. 1 Easy Listening Singles hit, “The Lesson” was written by Mack David (as was the co-written “It Must Be Him”) who was elected into the Songwriters Hall of Fame after his many accomplishments with numerous hit songs. Here’s a partial list of songs he either co-wrote as lyricist or on his own: “Bibbidi-Bobbidy-Boo” from the 1950 Disney film Cinderella, the title song from It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (sung by the Shirelles) the Top 10 hit song “Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte” from the Bette Davis/Olivia de Havilland film, made into a hit by Patti Page, “The Ballad Of Cat Ballou” from the Lee Marvin flick, among other movie tunes. Additional Mack David Pop hits included: “Cherry Pink And Apple Blossom White” from the Jane Russell film Underwater, which was the biggest hit of 1955 by the ‘King of the Mambo,” Perez Prado, “La Vie en rose” by Louis Armstrong for the English lyrics of the Edith Piaf signature tune, “Baby It’s You” originally for the Shirelles, then recorded by the Beatles and a hit again by a group called Smith in ’69. But arguably, he may be best known TV show themes including one that you’ll know instantly; the theme for “Casper The Friendly Ghost.” He was also responsible for the lyrics to “This Is It” the then new theme for The Bugs Bunny Show in 1960. Add to those, how about the theme for 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye and Surfside 6—all quite recognizable to the ‘Baby-Boom’ generation. The ‘Tin-Pan-Alley’ lyricist Mack David died in 1993.  

 

BEST SELLING R&B SINGLES CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

 

(Last Week No. 1)

“CHAIN OF FOOLS”

Aretha Franklin

ATLANTIC RECORDS – 2464

“Chain Of Fools” was the fourth million-selling single by the Good-Lookin,’ Good-Cookin’, Right Rockin’ Lady Soul. In fact, the song came from the LP called Lady Soul, which was chock full of hits. This was the last of four back-to-back survey-phases as the top 45 RPM on the Best Selling Rhythm & Blues Singles chart. “Chain Of Fools” was written by soul man Don Covay (who would also write her later hit called “See Saw”) for the newly crowned Queen of Soul. “Chain Of Fools” was the second single from Lady Soul, after the initial 45, “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman.” “Chain Of Fools” reached No. 2 for two weeks on the Hot 100, kept out of the top spot on that chart by “Love Is Blue” from Paul Mauriat (**see above.)

The LP Lady Soul had been released by Atlantic Records on January 22, 1968 when “Chain Of Fools” was in its second week (of four) in the No. 1 spot on the Best Selling R&B Singles listing. The video above is the short version, with Aretha singing along to a pre-recorded track. Here’s the un-edited version that has only been released sporadically on Aretha anthologies.

Yeah, that was Joe South playing those very low guitar notes on the song. Other luminaries on the track were Muscle Shoals and Memphis stand-out Spooner Oldham on piano, her musical leader King Curtis along with Charlie Chalmers on sax, Tommy Cogbill on bass, Roger Hawkins on drums, Truman Thomas on organ, Jimmy Johnson on guitar, Melvin Lastie on trumpet and Tony Studd on bass trombone. The story goes that Atlantic Records executive producer Jerry Wexler wanted a song from Don Covay for Otis Redding to lay down to tape. After hearing Covay’s demo, Wexler (who produced the track) turned it over to Aretha, and the rest is history. “Chain Of Fools” won a Grammy® Award in the Best Female R&B Vocal Performance category; later inducted into the Grammy® Hall of Fame. The follow-up single to “Chain Of Fools” was one of Big Jay’s fave Aretha tracks, “(Sweet Sweet Baby) Since You’ve Been Gone” (No. 5 and another million-selling single) backed with another stand-alone hit (No. 16 Pop) “Ain’t No Way.”

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

February 10, 1968



TOP LPs

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘68:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR

The Beatles

CAPITOL RECORDS2835

The Beatles opened 1968 with an LP that wasn’t even anticipated to be an album in the first place. Capitol Records, always looking for ways to make the most of their biggest import, decided to release the six songs that were written explicitly for the British TV film Magical Mystery Tour; plus some random other singles and B sides. This was the sixth of an ultimate eight weeks as the TOP LPs chart-topper.

In jolly-old England, the songs from the movie were released as double-EP (Extended Play) singles. Those EP’s were released in Blighty about a week and a half later than the American album called Magical Mystery Tour. The premise of the “tour” was to have the Beatles hire a bus and travel the English countryside in it with a horde of misfits and character actors along for the journey. There was just a basic outline for the film, developed generally by McCartney. The Beatles ended up winging it on the spot for much of the film; leading the end product to be called a disaster by critics when shown on BBC-TV in the U.K. This was considered the first failure the group had endured during their incredibly successful run. But nobody could complain about new Beatles songs. The current 45 RPM, and the only two NEW songs released as a single from the LP were “Hello Goodbye,” backed with “I Am The Walrus.” “Hello Goodbye” had just spent three weeks in the No. 1 slot on the Hot 100 to start 1968, while the more imaginative “I Am The Walrus” as the B side just reached No. 56 on the Pop listing. I’ll feature both here. First, here’s the simple, “Hello Goodbye.”


The Beatles - Hello Goodbye [HIGH QUALITY] by Electric_Eye

Now here’s the more exploratory “I Am The Walrus.”

Note the above was the 2013 re-mastered version of “I Am The Walrus” with the surprising different ending! The songs written for the film included: “Magical Mystery Tour,” “The Fool On The Hill,” “Flying,” (the first song to have been written by all four members of the group) “Blue Jay Way,” from George Harrison, “Your Mother Should Know,” and “I Am The Walrus.” Finally heard in true stereo in the U.S. years later, the American side-two of the original LP featured fake stereo versions of already released mono singles: “Hello, Goodbye,” “I Am The Walrus,” “Strawberry Fields Forever,” “Penny Lane,” “Baby You’re A Rich Man,” and “All You Need Is Love.”

 

BEST SELLING

R&B

 LPs CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘68

No. 1

R&B

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

 

THE TEMPTATIONS IN A MELLOW MOOD

The Temptations

GORDY RECORDS – 924

 

The Temptations were certainly still “Temptin’” this week in ’68. The Gordy (Motown) Records artists were in the sixth week of a seven survey-period residency at the apex of the Hot R&B LPs chart with the album called The Temptations In A Mellow Mood. The album didn’t contain a 45 RPM release. Instead the suits at Motown were desperately trying to make their premier male vocal group more tolerable toward adult and notably white adult audiences. The liner notes were even supposedly written by a New York favorite, comic TV star Soupy Sales; who in the ‘50s had a TV show in Detroit. He wrote that, “One of the pleasures of show business is to see a group continue to grow and mature in their selection of song material. It is quite evident that with this album the Temptations have reached a new plateau in their career. Here are the Temptations trying to go uptown with a song from the Broadway show The Fantasticks called “Try To Remember.” It was credited as being written by the original composers Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt, but with some added embellishments, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland got co-writing credit on this recording. 

Yet, even with this new push toward a more ‘mature’ audience, members of the Temptations were leery of being seen as “sell-outs” to their black audience.  Now; here’s an almost cheesy cut with David Ruffin leading the Temptations with “The Impossible Dream.”

And finally, here’s Temptations member Paul Williams singing another track from the album, “For Once In My Life” made famous by Stevie Wonder and considered one of the crowning jewels of the Motown catalog of songs. It was Paul Williams who had the biggest concerns about the sell-out by the group!

Perhaps perceiving this valid apprehension, the brass at Motown released the Temptations’ current single “I Wish It Would Rain” instead of a track from the LP The Temptations In A Mellow Mood. That song was the primary hit 45 of the next three weeks on the Hot R&B Singles chart. That song would be the title cut for an album that would be released in late April of ’68. That album also reached the crest of the Best Selling R&B LPs chart in the spring.

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

 

Chart-Week ENDING

 

February 10, 1979


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

THIS WEEK IN ‘79:

 

No. 5 (LW 8) “FIRE”

The Pointer Sisters PLANET45901

No. 4 (LW 4) “A LITTLE MORE LOVE”

Olivia Newton-John MCA440975

No. 3 (LW 1) “LE FREAK”  

Chic ATLANTIC3519

No. 2 (LW 2) “YMCA” 

Village People CASABLANCA945

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 3)

 

“DO YA THINK I’M SEXY?”


Rod Stewart

WARNER BROS. RECORDS8724

 

This song was a parody of the cocaine-fueled Disco scene in New York City in the late ‘70s. The narrative is sung in the third person, so it’s not a Rod Stewart auto-biographical escapade. Blondes Have More Fun from Rod Stewart was released the week of Thanksgiving of ’78 by Warner Bros. Records. The album featured a wide range of styles, but notably, the former “Rod the Mod” dipped his toes into the disco-fied waters of the music biz in ’78 when it was recorded. Think “Miss You” by the Rolling Stones” and you get the idea that Brit superstars also wanted a piece of the short-lived American Disco pie, much like the Bee Gees and even Paul McCartney with Wings did a bit later in ’79 with “Goodnight Tonight.” Stewart’s “Disco” single “Do You Think I’m Sexy?” was yet another triumph for the British singer and his fourth to reach the apex of the Hot 100.

That’s Jazz legend Tom Scott on the sax. “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy?” reached a respectable No. 5 on the Hot Soul Singles chart as well; a tough feat for a British artist. This was the first week in the No. 1 position for the single on the Hot 100 (the first of four) and the album was also No. 1 on the Top LPs & Tape listing. The song was co-written by Stewart, Carmine Appice, his drummer, formerly with the ‘60s band Vanilla Fudge and then in ’69-’72 with the hard-rockin’ group Cactus and a guy named Duane Hitchings. HIS name is not on the 45 RPM release as a co-writer, but he was. In fact, Hitchings says he wrote it mostly with Appice after Carmine said they had to write a Disco song in 20 minutes. The keyboard player cranked it out, and really didn’t like it. Stewart didn’t care much for it either; but he must have heard something in it…and it ended up being one of the defining songs for Rod, who wrote the chorus. Hitchings has largely been a Country music player for several decades; although his roots were deeply into Hard Rock music.   

 

EASY LISTENING SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79

No.1

Easy Listening

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“I JUST FALL IN LOVE AGAIN”

Anne Murray

CAPITOL RECORDS4675

This was the follow-up single to Anne Murray’s Grammy® winning biggest hit ever; “You Needed Me.” “I Just Fall In Love Again” was the biggest hit song during this survey-period on the Easy Listening Singles chart; with a total of four back-to-back weeks all together. Many people think Murray recorded the song first. Nope. It was done by Carpenters in 1977 from their album Passage. Richard Carpenter says A&M Records didn’t release their recording as a single because they thought it was too long! Here’s Carpenters’ version first so you can compare enterpretations.

First up to do a remake was British White-Soul Sister, Dusty Springfield on her ’79 LP called Living Without Your Love. Her then record label United Artists was sold the very week Dusty’s album was released, and it simply got lost in the shuffle. Here’s Dusty’s take on “I Just Fall in Love Again.”

But Anne Murray, who called Dusty her, “Favorite singer,” did a rendition of the song intended for her new album New Kind Of Feeling that included “You Needed Me.” “I Just Fall In Love Again” was produced by legendary Country producer/performer Jim Ed Brown in Toronto, Canada. Here’s a concert version of the song from Anne Murray.

Anne Murray’s take on her studio recording also was No. 1 on the Country Singles chart. It got to No. 12 on the Hot 100. A duet of the tune with Anne and Dusty was recorded as well!

 

HOT SOUL SINGLES

CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘79

No.1

Soul

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)

“Aqua Boogie

(A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop)

Parliament

CASABLANCA RECORDS – 950

 

I know. What the heck does A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop mean? Beats the funk out of me! But this was the chart-topper on the Hot Soul Singles chart this week in ’79; the last of four consecutive survey-phases as the leader. But for all of its success on the Soul chart, it was a total dud on the Hot 100, reaching only No. 89. The Parliament album featuring this track was called Motor Booty Affair was designed to be ‘goofy’ in a way, complete with lyrics that were, let’s just say, hard to define. And yes, it was a concept album with an aquatic theme; intended for a P-Funk movie that never came to fruition. Here’s the 12-inch single mix of the song.

Obviously, this guy doesn’t like the water. Psychedelic Funk-master George Clinton was starting to run out of gas by 1979. The humorous album featuring “Aqua Boogie (A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop)” on Casablanca Records was the last single release from his Parliament incarnation on that label after a five year run. The vinyl LP featured a pop-up Atlantis when you opened the fold-out, complete with cut-out figures. This was also the last song to feature Bernie Worrell with a writing credit, along with George Clinton and William “Bootsy” Collins. Both of Clinton’s groups, Parliament and Funkadelic (a/k/a P-Funk) were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1997.

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS


 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

February 10, 1979

TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

BLONDES HAVE MORE FUN

Rod Stewart 

WARNER BROTHERS RECORDS3261

 

The initial single from Blondes Have More Fun from Rod Stewart was “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy?”—the No. 1 song this week on the Hot 100 singles chart. (**See above.) The second single was a risky release, titled “Ain’t Love A Bitch.” Other songs with the word prominently featured have been No. 1 records—notably Elton John with “The Bitch Is Back” in ’74, and “Rich Girl” (uttered at the end of the song) by Daryl Hall & John Oates in ’77. Stewart’s “Ain’t Love A Bitch” from the LP didn’t make it even close to the top spot on the Hot 100; peaking at No. 22. This second single from the LP was released on as a 45 RPM in early ’79, entering the Hot 100 on the week ending on April 21st. Stewart co-wrote “Ain’t Love A Bitch” with journeyman guitarist/songwriter Gary Grainger.

Blondes Have More Fun featured a cookin’ rhythm section that included former Vanilla Fudge and Cactus drummer, Carmine Appice (co-writer with Stewart on “Do You Think I’m Sexy?”) who still performs with various bands (including a revitalized Cactus) along with sought after bass player Phillip Chen. The balance of the group (aptly called the Rod Stewart Band) featured Stewart’s then musical director and guitarist Jim Cregan, who would go on to write other Stewart hits “Passion,” “Tonight I’m Yours” and co-wrote Rod’s later Grammy®-winning hit, “Forever Young.” The final regular group member was guitarist, Billy Peek. The entire band was dismissed by Stewart in 1991. Guest musicians were plentiful on Blondes Have More Fun, including Tom Scott on the sax solo on “Do You Think I’m Sexy?” and Rolling Stones’ keyboard player, Nicki Hopkins along with over a dozen others. Native New Yorker and legendary producer Tom Dowd did those honors for the album. He passed away in ’02.

 

HOT SOUL LPs

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘79:

No. 1

Soul

LP

(Last Week No. 1)

C’EST CHIC

Chic

ATLANTIC RECORDS19209

This was the 9th of 11 total consecutive weeks as the best-selling Hot Soul LP chart-chief for Chic, with the album C’est Chic on Atlantic Records. The album was released back in August of ’78, and gained steam as it went along, featuring the colossal multi-million-selling single, “Le Freak.” The album also featured “I Want Your Love” that hit the charts earlier in February of ’79 (this week to be exact) becoming a million-seller. It peaked at No. 5 on the Hot Soul Singles listing, and No. 7 on the Hot 100—selling over one million copies along the way. Oddly, “I Want Your Love” was the biggest hit ever for Chic in the U.K…attaining sales higher than “Le Freak.” This was the first of 19 weeks on the U.S. Hot 100 for “I Want Your Love,” written with the intent for Sister Sledge to record. Alfa Anderson and Luci Martin were the female lead singers on this track. 16 musicians were featured.

The album C’est Chic incorporated the album track and club fave “Chic Cheer”—all written and produced by Nile Rogers and Bernard Edwards. Guitarist/songwriter Rogers and his bass guitar virtuoso/songwriting partner Edwards originally called the song “Le Freak” “F&*% Off,” but wisely changed the title. The reason for that original profane title is that of legend, as both musicians were supposed to be guests of Grace Jones but denied entrance to the infamous Studio 54 Disco nightclub where she was performing on New Year’s Eve in 1977 to promote her first Club hit “I Need A Man.” Jones forgot to tell the overly thin-skinned doormen that Rogers and Edwards were on the list; thus, the vulgarity for the snub.

 

 

THE

BIG

SINGLES


For the

Chart-Week Ending

February 11, 1989


HOT 100

TOP 5 SINGLES

 

THIS WEEK IN ’89:

No. 5 (LW 3) “WHEN THE CHILDREN CRY”

White Lion ATLANTIC89015

No. 4 (LW 4) “BORN TO BE MY BABY”

Bon Jovi MERCURY872156

No. 3 (LW 5) “WILD THING”

Tone Loc DELICIOUS VINYL102

No. 2 (LW 1) “WHEN I’M WITH YOU”

Sheriff CAPITOL5199

 

No.1

Pop

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 2)


“STRAIGHT UP”

Paula Abdul

VIRGIN RECORDS99256

 

Paula Abdul’s first two single releases were what we call in the radio business (and the record business) stiffs. Ok, so the first one called “Knocked Out” didn’t quite do that for many people (reaching No. 41 on the Hot 100), the second one totally bombed; at least on the Pop side. While Virgin Records was promoting her second single “(It’s Just) The Way That You Love Me” (reaching only No. 88) they got word that radio stations had begun playing another song from the album Forever Your Girl called “Straight Up.” To be fair, “(It’s Just) The Way That You Love Me” did have some success on the R&B Singles listing. But when a radio station in San Francisco started getting bombarded with requests for a track from Abdul’s album, Virgin Records switched gears and helped propel “Straight Up” to become this week’s number one Pop song in the U.S.

The video of the song featured the then new TV talk show host Arsenio Hall, which won several awards from MTV.  A former Broadcasting major at California State University at Northridge, Abdul was picked to be an L.A. Lakers cheerleader; later becoming a choreographer after being discovered by the Jacksons. Paula ended up selling over a million copies of “Straight Up,” and was her biggest hit. This survey-period in ’89 was the first of those three weeks as the prime single in America. Her debut album took over a year to become the No. 1 LP in the nation; finally achieving that goal for just one survey-phase for the week ending on October 7, 1989. The album had been released on June 13, 1988. That’s determination. It eventually sold over seven million in the U.S. alone. Abdul has been nominated for a number of music awards and won a Grammy® Award in 1991 for Best Video— Short Form for her song “Opposites Attract.” In recent memory, Paula has been a judge on TV’s American Idol and The X Factor, with several controversies following her along the way.  

 

ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘89

No.1

ADULT CONTEMPORARY

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)


“HOLDING ON”

Steve Winwood

VIRGIN RECORDS99261

Virgin Records was on a win-streak this week with the No. 1 song on the Hot 100 Singles chart; and the biggest hit on the Adult Contemporary Singles listing as well with “Holding On” from Steve Winwood. The single reached No. 11 on the Hot 100 Singles chart. “Holding On” was the third single from the album Roll With It; featuring that former No. 1 title track. “Holding On” was the last of Winwood’s four No. 1 songs on the Adult Contemporary Singles listing through his solo career.

Featuring the Memphis Horns (Wayne Jackson and Andrew Love) “Holding On” was co-written by Winwood and a longtime collaborator, Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee, Will Jennings. Jennings is perhaps best known for his collaborations on Academy Award® winning songs “Up Where We Belong” from the film An Officer And A Gentleman, by Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes, along with “My Heart Goes On” by Celine Dion from the film Titanic. Jennings co-wrote “Tears In Heaven” along with Eric Clapton and many other hit songs. The Birmingham, England native, Winwood isn’t a slouch either, as a former member of Spencer Davis Group when he was 16 years-old, later with Blind Faith with Clapton and Traffic during the late ‘60s into the early ‘70s. “Holding On” was Winwood’s ninth of 10 Top 10 solo hits on the Hot 100. The second single from the album Roll With It was “Don’t You Know What The Night Can Do” (No. 6 Pop) and used on a Michelob Beer commercial; with the last of four singles called “Heart’s On Fire, reaching only No. 53 on the Pop chart. Both Winwood and his co-producer Tom Lord-Alge won a Grammy® for Best Engineered Recording - Non-Classical on this album and its predecessor, Back In The High Life in ’86.  

 

HOT BLACK SINGLES CHART

THIS WEEK IN ‘89

No.1

R&B

45 RPM

(Last Week No. 1)

“CAN YOU STAND THE RAIN”

New Edition

MCA RECORDS53464

New Edition’s “Can You Stand The Rain” was in the last of two back-to-back weeks as the standard-barer of the Hot Black Singles chart this week in ’89. This was their last chart hit for over seven years, when the original group reunited in 1996 for two Top 10 Pop hits; including the No. 1 Hot R&B Singles chart leader “Hit Me Off.” Hailing from Boston, New Edition first charted with “Candy Girl” in 1983, with “Cool It Now” their biggest hit during their first look at success.  Both of those two songs were No. 1 R&B hits. By the time “Can You Stand The Rain” was on the charts; Bobby Brown had already left New Edition in 1986 and had a fairly good solo career. This left original members Ricky Bell, Michael “Biv” Bivens, Ronnie DeVoe and Rob Tresvant to keep the act alive. By 1988, they brought along Johnnie Gill to the act, and this was the line-up for “Can You Stand The Rain.”

Gill had some success as a solo performer and made some noise when he joined Stacy Lattisaw for duet called “Perfect Combination” in ’84. New Edition took a break after “Can You Stand The Rain” for some side projects, including the trio   Bell Biv DeVoe, and Tresvant and Gill each doing a solo album. They reunited again in 2011, to commemorate the 30th anniversary of their first hit “Candy Girl,” which really wasn’t released until 1983—but perhaps math wasn’t their best friend. Brown has been recognized as one of the ‘New Jack Swing’ founders, was chastised for his on-stage sexual antics, other run-ins with the law, has dealt with alcohol and drug issues and of course was married to the late Whitney Houston from 1992 through 2007. Their daughter Bobbi was recently discovered face-down in a bathtub in her home in Atlanta. 

 

  

 

THE

BIG

ALBUMS

 For the Chart-Week

ENDING

February 11, 1989


TOP LPs & TAPE

CHART

 

THIS WEEK IN ‘89:

No. 1

Pop

LP

(Last Week No. 2)

APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION

Guns N’ Roses 

GEFFEN RECORDS24148

This album is one of the best-selling albums in the U.S., selling over 18 million copies to date. But it took a while to catch on. Appetite For Destruction was the No. 1 album this week in ’89; the third time it had occupied that spot for Guns N’ Roses. This time Appetite For Destruction was at the apex of the Top Pop Albums chart due to the success of its third single, “Paradise City.” This was the last of a total of only five non-consecutive survey-phases as America’s biggest album. The first single from the group’s debut album was “It’s So Easy.” That song didn’t even reach the Hot 100—nor did “Welcome To The Jungle” initially. That first POP chart explosion happened with “Sweet Child O’ Mine” and was the No. 1 song on the Hot 100 Singles listing for two weeks in September of 1988. “Sweet Child Of Mine” became the biggest hit in the U.S. a few weeks after the LP was in the No. 1 slot for just a week. The “sweet child” ended up famously being the daughter of Don Everly, Erin. She and Axl Rose were briefly married in the early ‘90s. But after “Sweet Child Of Mine,” the album wasn’t done yet. “Welcome To The Jungle” about coming to New York City for the first time, was re-released and reached No. 7 on the Hot 100 at the end of 1988. That sparked another run up to the No. 1 spot for three weeks for the album. Finally, this week’s last stand as the album chart-topping record was fueled by what really was the fourth single, “Paradise City.” That track got to No. 5 on the Hot 100 and boosted Appetite For Destruction to the top one final time.

If you knew that Axl Rose was raised as William Bailey in Lafayette, Indiana, you’d win a gun or a rose. The leader of the group was in Juvenile Court more times than he could count. His real father’s last name was Rose, as he found out when he was 17 years-old. At that point, he decided to call himself W. Rose. During a stint with an early band, W. decided to use the name Axl, short for the Scandinavian name Axel—to become officially W. Axl Rose. He and Jeff Isabell a/k/a Izzy Stradlin started a Punk band. However, Izzy left for L.A. with Axl soon to follow. They put an ad in a local paper and after a few false starts, finally landed on the guy they were looking for names Saul Hudson, a/k/a Slash. Add to the line-up Duff McKagan on bass, and drummer Steven Adler and you have the five guys who made history with their debut album.

**Special thanks to www.ShopRadioCast.com for supplying the photo of the 45 RPM adapter insert.

(Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net -- '60s 45 record image by dan; '70s headphones/vinyl record image by dan; '80s cassette tape image by graur razvan ionut.)

**All chart information is used by permission of Record Research, Inc., from Publisher Joel Whitburn. The original information comes from Billboard Magazine’s various Hot 100 singles, Top 200 albums, and various R & B charts published by Billboard as compiled by Record Research. www.RecordResearch.com

Copyright 2013-2014 by Big Jay Sorensen, Hosted by STCNtech (stcntech.com)
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